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Some may relate, others not.... but a valid question none the less

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Richard White (richardsrelics)

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#1
I am a tall person, 6'5" to be exact. My issue is the world of anything basically is just not designed for such big sexy men, like myself. Especially older machinery, such as a 1947 Logan Lathe. Which brings me to my question.
Aside from building a taller bench with which to mount the lathe to, how have others accomplished raising their machinery to match our taller statures?

My concern is with limiting vibration and ensuring expected accuracy from the machine.

Thanks

Richard
 

dpb

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#2
For my PM1440GT, I turned some 6" aluminum round into 4" tall feet. The factory leveling screws rest in divots machined into the top of each foot. There have been zero negative side effects.
JBolt did a much fancier job on his, which can be viewed on his thread PM1440GT HAS LANDED.
 

Jimsehr

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#3
I have seen many shops use round slugs of stock to make feet for their lathes. I would call metal saw cutting shops to see if they had any drops for a cheaper way to go. But I think you could just use coffee cans with cement in them to do the job.
 

brino

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#4
Whenever I do dishes at the kitchen sink I think of cutting a recess in the floor!
Let the wife put a board over it when she's there.
I usually end up with my feet about 2' apart so I'm not hunched over too far.

JBolt did a much fancier job on his, which can be viewed on his thread PM1440GT HAS LANDED.
Hey dpb, I did a search for that thread and came up dry. Got a link?

Thanks,
-brino
 

Superburban

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#5
Here is the link for jBolts thread. The stands are on page 2

http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/the-pm-1440gt-has-landed.50194/

I have considered many things, but like many still have done nothing. One top contender for my mill, is to make a block of reinforced concrete, 6 or so inches thick, for the VN22 mill to sit on (Poured in place, but able to easily be removed after I am gone, returning the shop to a normal garage). For the lathe, I have been considering a costum base made fro 2" square tubing, or similar, that also functions as a tool cabinet holder. I have seen many good ideas, and will likely see many others before I ever get around to doing anything.
 

Bob La Londe

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#6
For my PM1440GT, I turned some 6" aluminum round into 4" tall feet. The factory leveling screws rest in divots machined into the top of each foot. There have been zero negative side effects.
JBolt did a much fancier job on his, which can be viewed on his thread PM1440GT HAS LANDED.
Factory Leveling Screws? I got no such animal with my PM1440LBE. I just leveled it with shim stock.
 

4gsr

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#8
Need to get you a 15" Sheldon lathe.

I have mine on 2 x 8 runners with leveling wedges under it. It's so high now I have a hard time looking to see what I'm cutting on and I'm 5" 10".
 

f350ca

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#9
I need to raise my Summit 17x80. The width of the carriage makes you bend over to see in a bore. Gets real hard on the back.

Greg
 

richl

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#10
For.my enco 13x40 I built a 2x3 tube steel frame, welded it together and bolted it to the bottom of the base. I did not need to go as high, I am 5'11". It's a good working height now. The cabinet, frame combo jbolt did is pretty awesome
 
Last edited:

Holescreek

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#11
My buddy bought two pieces of 6" square thick walled tubing at the scrap yard and we set his Cincy Toolmaster mill on top of them. Solved his sore back problem.
 

kd4gij

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#12
I am 6' I just sit on a stool most of the time. The shorter guys at work rage on me until They have to get a stool to change a tool in the BP. Then it is my turn.
 

Superburban

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#13
I'm so tempted at times to say to a short person in a store " You are short, can you get me that item on the bottom shelf?" Most of the time, I don't mind helping get an item off the top shelf, but do not drag me to another isle. :mad:


Sorry, Rant over.
 

2volts

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#14
I'm same height. 6'5". My lathe is OK for me (Taiwanese AL960B, pretty much the same as the Grizzly G4003G) but my old RF30 mill drill is a bit low. It's on a frame on castors and nearly all my work gets done in a vice on the table so that all helps, but from time to time I find myself sitting on a chair to do some jobs. I've got plans to get a new mill eventually so Ill put up with it until then.

Recently my wife was away for a week, she said she left some frozen meals in the freezer for me. For the life of me I couldn't see them in the big freezer bin. I turns out there is a set of drawers in the freezer immediately under the fridge section that I never knew were there, just right for short people.

pete
 

SSage

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#15
I use a padded bar stool on some machines when I'm tired of leaning over or just tired of standing. I also use a nice HD office chair when I run my punch presses that sit lower. My little shop has those rubber work mats and horse mats too, helps my feet survive the long days. I'm only 6'-4".
 

Silverbullet

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#16
I'm in the 6'4" use to be handsome devil club . Now I build risers for everything even now in a wheelchair there to low. I'm in the slow process of getting surgery on my spine . Before that I had been building machine stands , with casters and levelers if needed. I'm committed to make moving them easier. And getting my shop open for room to move around in. I added 12" to a leather sewing machines height , a stand with wheels .
 

Glenn Brooks

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#17
For 60 or 70 years smaller South Bends were mounted on wooden benches, with no ill effects. I would seriously consider building up a bench frame with 4x4 vertical posts, as tall as suited your height, and brace it well with 1x4 or even 2x6 and carriage bolts - using the tried and true SB design. It's easy enuf to bolt two pieces of 1/4" steel flat bar to each end of the top of the bench and use the steel plate as a base to level the lathe bed. This way you get the height you want, and a nice work area to boot.

My 1919 7x 36" Dalton is mounted on a similar wood bench, with 2x6 underlayment and a single,piece of 1/2 finish grade varnished plywood for the table top. It is rock solid and levels up nicely with steel plate under each of the feet.

Glenn
 

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Richard White (richardsrelics)

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#18
As storage space gets more and more scarce, I will add blocks to decipher at what height I want to attain where it is comfortable, then build a bench...will have to call on friends to transfer the lathe to the table though.....

Thanks for all the input

Richard
 
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