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Silver solder

Discussion in 'QUESTIONS & ANSWERS (Get Help Fast Here!)' started by dlane, Aug 6, 2017.

  1. dlane

    dlane Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Hi all, was woundering what type of silver solder is good for general shop use , cast iron to cast iron, are there codes for different types and what do they mean
    Carbide to steel , brass to ? , amazon prime trial is almost over,
    Thanks
     
  2. Ulma Doctor

    Ulma Doctor Infinitely Curious Active Member

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    you'll probably wanna use hard solder for most things in the shop- but having medium around won't hurt any either

    the softer the solder, the easier it flows.
     
    dlane likes this.
  3. Tony Wells

    Tony Wells United States Former Vice President Staff Member Administrator

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    Silver soldering is a great way for joining many things. I prefer it to brass based brazing for everything I can afford the cost difference on. Naturally, the higher the silver content of any alloy, the greater the cost. But there can be justifications. I typically use an alloy popular with the HVAC guys for general purpose. Alloys in popular use in that industry do not require fluxing, but it can make delicate jobs a bit easier, or on certain materials. Generally brass and copper are done without. It goes without saying that clean is necessary, especially for skipping on the flux. Here is a chart that you may find useful.

    http://www.silfos.com/htmdocs/product_support/alloy_selection_guide.html
     
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  4. 4gsr

    4gsr Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Doing a little browsing in Amazon, very few listings were available at a discount using Prime. Unless you don't mind the Forny brand made in China. Those were available using your Prime. I'm no expert at any of this, just learning. I found the Sil Fos Silvaloy 505 to be a good one to have for doing any steel to carbide brazing in my searching. I think I will wait to buy any until I have a need for it! That stuff is expensive!
     
  5. dlane

    dlane Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Thanks for the info, ya that stuff is pricey think I'll wait till a need arises also
     
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  6. Doodle

    Doodle United States Steel Registered Member

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    I have used Low Temperature silver solder for years. For antennas and connectors exposed to salt water spray, electronics solder won't stand up. A small kit costs about $50, includes the flux. It has a high tensile strength and because it works at low temperature you don't need a special torch. A soldering gun or propane torch is plenty of heat, even a heat gun would do it. Strong enough for clock repair or solder up a nut to sheet metal. Clean the flux off well if you want it to be shiny. If interested I can look up the details on the package.
     

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