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Shop / Machine Lighting

Discussion in 'SAFETY ISSUES & EQUIPMENT' started by Splat, Jun 28, 2016.

  1. Splat

    Splat Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I need more lighting where my lathe is. I'm looking at those portable halogen work lights on a stand. So what's your setup for shop or machine lighting? Pics gets you extra points. :)
     
  2. kvt

    kvt Active User Active Member

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    I would not do that, I would get me some LED lights. Those things give off so much heat, (unless you are cold). I have put in the LED style floressent light fixtures above stuff and have other LEDs as well. In fact I have started to move most of my lights to them. I get the High K ones for the shop and the less for the house. The ones like 6000k are the white bright lights, And put light all over the place not just spot as the halogen ones do. They are a so less heat, and cost less to run.
    Some of the guys have made magnetic stands to hook to the lathe and rings for the mills so they have extra light where they need them.
    As you can tell I have gone for LEDs.
     
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  3. BGHansen

    BGHansen United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I have a couple of the 4' LED lights pictured below from Wal-Mart. Absolutely love them!

    I had been rebuilding crapped out 4' fluorescents with a couple of standard bulb fixtures and R30 LED floods (about $4 at Wal-Mart). That give me 130 watts of lighting for 22 watts of power. Plus they work below 20 F.

    Bruce

    upload_2016-6-28_20-56-26.png
     
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  4. pdentrem

    pdentrem Active User Active Member

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    No to halogen. As noted too hot, too expensive. Gave up on fluorescent tubes as well. They do not work when cold, minimal heat in winter, just enough to prevent rust. I switched to led last year and no flicker, no hum, no burns, starts when cold, good color rendition, and cheap to run. I call it job done.
    Pierre
     
  5. T Bredehoft

    T Bredehoft Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    LED strip lights in or hung from the ceiling are really the way to go. At first it's too much light, then you get used to it and it is really great.
     
  6. Splat

    Splat Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I should have noted that I planned on using 300W halogen bulbs in the work lights but yes, they do get darn hot! I've been looking around and saw a post about a guy using just two of these Snap-on 2000-lumen LED work lights in his work shop and he loves them. So I take a look on Amazon and see it gets many raving reviews. Well, I just purchased one. I can rig up a stand or hang it from the wall. I like the fact it's portable and no or low heat, and being LED should last a good while. I have a low ceiling in the basement so I figure I'll mount this pointing towards the ceiling so the light will reflect back nicely. I don't think you can ever have too much light, unless it's staring right in your eyes. :cool 3:
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2016
  7. dlane

    dlane Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Sewing machine led , mag base, 110v ,
    image.jpeg
    Sorry pic is goofy, it was good loading it,
     
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  8. jocat54

    jocat54 Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I know very little about led lights--but it seems that all that I have had have a blue hue to them and I can't see squat with them. Do they make some that are actually white light?
     
  9. derf

    derf Active Member Active Member

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    Desk lamps with BR30 led bulbs. Get creative with the mounts.
    lathelite.jpg
    millite.jpg
     
  10. pineyfolks

    pineyfolks Active User Active Member

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  11. mksj

    mksj Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    These are 6000-7000K color temperature bulbs, they are too blue and put out less light. You really want bulbs in the Daylight range which are 3000-4000K range, warm white is usually around 2700K and too yellow. There is a benefit from multiple lights to prevent shadows, and using a ring light under a mill spindle and side lights. On the lathe I use a light bar in the back under the splash shield lip and a MR16 Philips bulb in an arm light. Both lights have a daylight spectrum. The generic and Feit LEDs tend to have awful light spectrum and CRI (coloration index). Look at Philips, Sylvania or other major brand, they tend to have better coloration and last longer.

    20150515_142850.jpg
     
  12. Fabrickator

    Fabrickator United States Active User Active Member

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    I have my shop lights (6-4" florescent) scattered over machine work spaces and work bench. Each machine has a small clamp on with a 60W halogen spot bulb. For my band saw and drill press, I have a mag base, goose neck LED spot lights that point directly at the blade/drill and material contact point.
     

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  13. omni_dilletante

    omni_dilletante somewhat active H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I put three of the LED fixtures in my shop mentioned by BGHanson.

    It appears they have a Color Rendition Index of 80, which is the same as warm white fluorescent.

    If the color appears blue it is because you are used to low temperature lighting which is a bit yellow.

    These are more like daylight and the lighting is great. They throw a lot of light, no flicker, full intensity right away (no warm up period). I could not be happier.

    I purchased mine from amazon.com in March when they were $40 each. Looks like the price has gone up since then.
     
  14. RJSakowski

    RJSakowski H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    All white LED lights are fluorescent devices which use a blue LED to excite the phosphors. The white light is created by mixing the light from a predominately yellow phosphor to create a "white" light. They are usually deficient in the green and red parts of the spectrum although they are getting better. If you don't like the blue tint, select a warm light or one in the 2700 - 3000K range. It is actually not possible to have a full spectrum white LED (at least I have not seen one yet) but CF lights aren't full spectrum either. Incandescents, including halogens, offer the best shot at full spectrum.
     
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  15. Splat

    Splat Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I like those little guys from Ikea. I gotta see if they have them in stock. So today I got the Snap-On branded LED work light from Amazon. Yowza! It's very bright. More white-ish in color but with an excellent output spread. Now just gotta figure a way to mount it on the wall. I like the idea of a small spot for the lathe so still gonna get one of them.
     
  16. kvt

    kvt Active User Active Member

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    Now you know why a bunch of us have started converting things to the LEDs.
     
  17. RandyM

    RandyM United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Here are the LEDs over my mill.
    Mill Lights 02.JPG Mill Lights 03.JPG Mill Lights 04.JPG
     
  18. John Hasler

    John Hasler United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    The lamps in LED flashlights have poor color rendition because they are designed for efficiency at all costs. The LED room lighting I've seen looks ok to me (but I have poor color vision).
     
  19. FOMOGO

    FOMOGO Puerto Rico Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I've been using T5 HO fixtures (4', 4 bulb with mirrored reflectors) for general shop lighting, and have purchased 2 bulb, 4' LED's for bench/machine lighting. The LED's came from Costco and were around $26 for the bulbs and fixture. The T5's are convertible to LED, so as the price comes down I will most likely switch over to all LED over the long run, as the power usage is much lower. Mike
     
  20. Ironken

    Ironken United States Active Member Active Member

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    20160921_142522.jpg 20160920_144437.jpg 20160920_144456.jpg
    I threw this together outta necessity. The older I get, the more light I need.

    I broke a piece of 16g SS and pop riveted this cheapo Home Despot LED 9" under cabinet light to it. The light was $15. I also got bored and welded up a bracket to support a recoil air line and blow gun.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2016
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  21. Ironken

    Ironken United States Active Member Active Member

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