• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.
  • PLEASE: Read the FORUM RULES BEFORE registering!

Uglydog

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2012
Messages
2,220
Likes
1,209
#2
I keep a chair next to the table with my coffee and oil can next to my shaper.
A little old country & blue grass in the background.

Life doesn't get much better....

Daryl
MN
 
Last edited:

T Bredehoft

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2014
Messages
2,127
Likes
1,473
#3
The shaper was the first tool I ran in my apprenticeship. I remember being told of an engineer who, puzzled by the silver chips turning blue on the floor, picked one up to watch it. He suddenly wanted to put it down, but it was fused to his hand.
Pleasant memories of that period.
 

francist

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2013
Messages
672
Likes
755
#4
Any chance we could see a close-up of the tool, Mike? And you're not kidding -- it really does peel off the stock! Depth of cut looks like maybe 0.1" with a 5 thou step-over?

Thanks,

-frank
 

Ulma Doctor

Infinitely Curious
Active Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2013
Messages
4,294
Likes
3,483
#6
Any chance we could see a close-up of the tool, Mike? And you're not kidding -- it really does peel off the stock! Depth of cut looks like maybe 0.1" with a 5 thou step-over?
Thanks,
-frank
Hi Frank,
the doc was about .040", the step over is relatively small, about 3 pawl clicks- i should put a dial indicator on it to see what 3 clicks translates to.

here is a couple pics (over ground for accentuated visual effect) for the peanut gallery!
Nbn426N5VTgeZVrVNbSIYk-xi_DHM0lw6ExU3bb_YmbvTnZWFrCchtZBjEfm_dy9lsZSyUXvxA=w480-h640-no.jpg


tool%2Bbit%2Bgrind.jpg

the pictures doesn't show it, but there is some side rake that's responsible for the nice curl of the chips!
 

Attachments

Last edited:

mikey

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2012
Messages
3,026
Likes
2,943
#7
I've never used a shaper but it looks like a handy tool to have. I was wondering, Mike, what the advantage of a round nose tool is versus a flat tool with maybe more back rake. Is it because it provides a better finish? It would be fun to own a machine like that and mess around with tool geometry, just to see what happens. Now you have me thinking, which isn't good!
 

Ulma Doctor

Infinitely Curious
Active Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2013
Messages
4,294
Likes
3,483
#8
Hi Mikey,
thanks for looking.
the rounded nose removes a small amount of material ahead of the highest point of the radius of the tool, a kind of precut if you will.
i'm using this grind to rough out work
the finish is good, but not as smooth as a shearing bit
a shaper is just cool to watch and listen to, playing with it's capabilities is the icing on the cake!
thanks for your interest!
thinking on my part usually ends up with another project! :grin:
 

Doubleeboy

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2014
Messages
623
Likes
328
#9
Hi Mike, Thank you for photos, can you put a sharpie mark on edge that is doing cutting or maybe a photo of tool mounted on machine with machine not cutting?

Thanks
michael
 

francist

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2013
Messages
672
Likes
755
#11
Thanks Mike, I'm always interested to see what the capabilities of the other small machines are. The books all tell a person how and what to grind, but never really how much to safely take in one bite of a cut!
40 thousandths is a pretty decent depth, on a small machine anyways. As a matter of interest (or not) my ratchet pawl gives 5 thou stepover for each "click", so my finest feed is 5 thousandths and up to the 15 per step on a coarse feed. 8" shaper.

Thanks again for the info.

-frank
 

mikey

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Dec 20, 2012
Messages
3,026
Likes
2,943
#12
Hi Mikey,
thanks for looking.
the rounded nose removes a small amount of material ahead of the highest point of the radius of the tool, a kind of precut if you will.
i'm using this grind to rough out work
the finish is good, but not as smooth as a shearing bit
a shaper is just cool to watch and listen to, playing with it's capabilities is the icing on the cake!
thanks for your interest!
thinking on my part usually ends up with another project! :grin:

Got it. Like Daryl said, it must be soothing to sit back with a cup of coffee and watch that machine make something flat or cut a slot. I see these come up once in a great while in my area. Now I'll pay attention. Its not like I need more machines in here but you really do have me thinking. Appreciate the video, Mike!
 

Ulma Doctor

Infinitely Curious
Active Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2013
Messages
4,294
Likes
3,483
#14
here is a couple very cool videos i saw a while back that gave me some of the ideas involved with my grind design


i'll make a video of the process i used to make the cutter i used previously.
 
Last edited:

benmychree

John York
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jun 7, 2013
Messages
993
Likes
560
#16
On my shaper, I use the F.W. Taylor roughing tool shape; it has a smallish nose radius with larger flank radii and side rake; it would cut more freely that the one shown with less power expended. By 26 years of experiments, Taylor proved it to be the most efficient tool for removing the most material in a given time. Taylor and his partner Maunsel White, developed the Taylor White process for hardening HSS to cut at high speeds; discovered by accident, it revolutionized machine work and the design and building of machine tools.
 

benmychree

John York
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jun 7, 2013
Messages
993
Likes
560
#18
OK, hopefully this works! details: this is a 3/8 X 5/8" tool. end clearance should be perhaps 2 or 3 degrees, side clearance is about the same or less, side rake is 14 deg. measured form the tool shown. note that this tool cuts from left to right, facing the ram, the right to left tool, having been used most was considerably worn and not so photogenic.
For tougher steel, the side rake might be reduced to perhaps 8 or 10 degrees; the end clearance could be less, perhaps only 1 or 2 degrees. There is nothing magic about the numbers, but shaper / planer tools need very little end or side clearance, since the tool does not feed sideways in the cut as on a lathe; with the side rake, use as much as you can without the tool tending to hog into the cut or break down on the cutting edge; the main thing is to use a relatively small radius on the nose of the tool, the one shown is about 1/16" radius, the side radii are perhaps 3/4" radius. this radius on the leading edge of the cut acts to prevent the tool from working its way downwards and cutting deeper.
 

Attachments

Last edited:
Container Above bottom breadcrumb