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Seig Sx2.7 Milling Machine

Discussion in 'SHERLINE, TAIG, TITAN & SIEG MINI-MACHINES' started by Stephen krupa, Jan 28, 2016.

  1. Stephen krupa

    Stephen krupa United States Iron Registered Member

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    Hi Guys,

    I was wondering if anyone has first hand knowledge to provide a review of a Seig SX2.7 Bench Mill Drill. I was at the Cabin Fever Expo in PA and saw first hand Little Machine Shop's 5500 mill, which to my knowledge, is a clone of the Seig SX2.7. LMS is presently out of stock of this machine.

    There are several videos on YouTube featuring Frank Hoose's review of the Sieg SX2.7 model; very impressive to this beginner. It has DRO for both speed and spindle depth and the quill moves itself as opposed to the whole head. I find those desirable features. But again, I just wanted to inquire if anyone has firsthand experience with this machine.

    Thanks in advance,
    Steve Krupa
     
  2. matthew-s

    matthew-s United States Iron Registered Member

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    I'm interested in this machine too, so figured I'd bump. Looks like there is almost no first person info available on this machine.

    Is the 5500 really an sx2.7 or is it a g0704/pm25mv variant, which I think Aimee call the BF20?
     
  3. Stephen krupa

    Stephen krupa United States Iron Registered Member

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    Matthew,

    I not that sure regarding comparisons of each of these machines. I believe LMS said that their 5500 was a twin of the SX2.7. The 5500 just came on market. Maybe the SX2.7 is arriving at this time also? I have inquired on this Forum regarding the SX2.7 to no avail. I can't believe that there is no one who has one that won't chime in with their review of it. Unless, with the LMS 5500 and the SX2.7 being in fact, twins, they both arrive on our shores at the same time and no one has received theirs yet.

    Steve
     
  4. matthew-s

    matthew-s United States Iron Registered Member

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    Yes. Well I eventually saw on the LMS site that it is a 2.7. I'm embarrassed that I missed it in the post subject. I agree the Hoose video makes it look great. I am a rank beginner. Based on my interests (model steam, MAYBE a loco up to 3/4" scale) the SX2 class machine may be plenty. I'm not sure yet.
     
  5. Fossilbones

    Fossilbones Germany Iron Registered Member

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    If you have the money go for X3 mill. I have an X2 and its only suitable for really light work and I have just broken my first plastic gear in the motor drive. If you go with your original choice then decide on what work you will be doing, cutter sizes and how long it will take with an x2
     
  6. salindroth

    salindroth United States Steel Registered Member

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    I'm also thinking about upgrading my mini-mill to the SX2.7 (LMS) or SX3 (Grizzly). Moving the SX3 worries me -- lifting it up to the workbench will not be easy (ceiling's too low for a shop crane). Maybe this is a good excuse to get a new workbench with heavy casters...
     
  7. Fossilbones

    Fossilbones Germany Iron Registered Member

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    Use an engine mobile crane and a short rope...cheers
     
  8. salindroth

    salindroth United States Steel Registered Member

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    The SX3 column would come close to the sloping ceiling above the bench. Not sure the mobile shop crane boom would fit. Maybe if the mill head is down by the table.
     

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  9. higgite

    higgite General Manger - Proofreading Dept. Active Member

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    I have an LMS 5500 (SX2.7) that I lifted onto my bench with an engine hoist, but my shop has an 8’ ceiling that yours doesn’t. Although I had a little room to spare, yours still looks too low in the photo for that to work. Would something like a table lift possibly work for you? I’m thinking of something similar to what Hoose’s machine is sitting on in his video.

    Tom
     
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  10. salindroth

    salindroth United States Steel Registered Member

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    I think you are right. With the sx2.7 I could use a "material lift," which I rented to put the the mini mill and lathe into place. The SX3 would be too heavy/large for that.

    Do you like the SX2.7? I'm wondering if the capacity is enough of an increase from the mini mill to justify the upgrade. I invested in the mini mill by swapping in a brushless motor and replacing the gear drive with a home-made belt drive, so in some ways it's a better machine now than when it was new.

    Scott
     
  11. higgite

    higgite General Manger - Proofreading Dept. Active Member

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    Scott,

    Yes, I do like the 2.7, but it’s my first mill of any kind so I can’t compare it to anything else. Sorry I can’t be of more help.

    Something to think about if you are considering an engine hoist…. even if you lower the mill head near the table and use a short sling around the head to gain ceiling clearance, the hoist will still be limited as to how far it can reach over the bench top. I have a 1 ton Harbor Fright engine hoist. With the arm fully extended at a high enough angle to raise the mill to bench height, when I push the hoist legs under the bench and against the wall behind it, it is still over 2 feet from the wall to the lifting hook. Point being, it might not have enough reach for a shallow bench that backs up to a wall. My 2.7 sits on a 34" deep bench and I still had to push on it as I lowered it to get it all the way onto the bench. I was glad I had a helper. Just some food for thought.

    Tom
     
  12. salindroth

    salindroth United States Steel Registered Member

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    Thanks, Tom. I'm pretty sure the engine hoist would not work for the reasons you stated. I've thought of buying/building a small workbench on casters, rolling it out to the driveway (lots of headroom there...), hoisting the mill in place, and rolling it back into the garage. That would be the safest way to move either the SX2.7 or SX3. In the end, the SX2.7 is a better fit for my bench.
     
  13. Charles Spencer

    Charles Spencer Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I installed my two lathes and a drill press using a chain hoist. First I moved them into position on a movers dolly. I screwed large eye bolts into the joists above where they were going. The lathes weighed between 300 - 350 pounds, but I think you could do the same with a machine that was a bit heavier. Then I leaned a board with the top against the bench. I hoisted the machines up against the board.

    I just kept the bolts where I installed them in case I need to move them in the future.
     
  14. higgite

    higgite General Manger - Proofreading Dept. Active Member

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    Scott,

    Another thought... the SX2.7, or at least LMS' version of it, weighs just a hair over 200 lbs. I took the table off of mine to get it through the door on a hand cart and, out of curiosity, weighed the table while I had it off. As I recall, it weighed about 35 pounds. That would leave 170 lbs to lift if you can get it next to your bench on a dolly or something similar. Lifting it by hand would be pretty cumbersome, but a couple of strong backs might be able to do it by leaning it back and have one guy on the base and the other on the head. More food for thought. Of course, more bench top work space is always a plus, too, if you do decide to go with a separate bench.

    Tom
     
  15. mikey

    mikey Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    You guys need some young Samoans! I had ONE guy move my RF-31 on its stand using a hand truck. He got behind it, leaned it back onto his chest and then rolled it down my neighbor's driveway, 30 feet of sidewalk to my driveway, then up my driveway and into my shop - by himself. This is a 770# load! The guy was only about 5'5" tall and weighed maybe 175# but he was just seriously strong. I don't think he would breathe hard deadlifting 170#.
     
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  16. higgite

    higgite General Manger - Proofreading Dept. Active Member

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    Mike,

    Was he 71 years old and sadly out of shape? ;) (Speaking for myself, not Scott)

    Tom

    (Actually, I'm not out of shape. "Pear" is a shape.)
     
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  17. salindroth

    salindroth United States Steel Registered Member

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    Impressive. But like Tom I knew more guys like that when I was 28 than now at 58. BTW a professional rigger quoted $1200 to do the job for me. It was too small a project to make it worth their while unless I agreed to let them rob me.

    Scott
     
  18. tweinke

    tweinke United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    What if you used one of those lift tables to raise it to bench height then rolled it onto the bench on tubing. You could put the mill on the table in a convenient location roll it to the bench and raise it to the bench height. The table surly would be cheaper then the rigger and if purchased would be handy for many things.
     
  19. salindroth

    salindroth United States Steel Registered Member

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    Yes, I think this is the way to go. Thanks.

    Scott
     
  20. tweinke

    tweinke United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Darn it now I'm thinking I need one now after looking at the grizzly catalog!
     
  21. mikey

    mikey Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Nah, the guy was in his early 50's, though. He had three other guys hovering around in case the load shifted but I suspect he thought we were just getting in the way and kindly tolerated us. He wasn't exactly a young guy, that's for sure. Impressive.

    Oh, Tom, I haven't forgotten about the Superfly cutter test. I am almost done reconditioning that RF-31 and will let you know how it works when I get the chance.
     
  22. mikey

    mikey Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    $1200.00 is just stupid. I agree with you and would lift it onto a rolling table outside with a engine hoist and transfer it to your table indoors.
     
  23. higgite

    higgite General Manger - Proofreading Dept. Active Member

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    Scott,
    Heck, for $1200 bucks, it's probably cheaper in the long run to buy all the parts separately and assemble it on the bench. Sort of like a Heathkit milling machine.

    tweinke,
    If you think you need one, you need one. It's science. ;)

    Mikey,
    Hurry up, would you? I don't have all day. :grin: J/K, I know how it goes. I've been busy with some off topic stuff myself, but I'm getting an itchy trigger finger for a superfly. If nothing else, it has to be a great finishing tool.

    Tom
     
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  24. mikey

    mikey Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Heh, heh, if you knew what I had to go through to get machine ready ...
     
  25. salindroth

    salindroth United States Steel Registered Member

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    I got the feeling they didn't want my business, so it all worked out. :)

    I've always liked the scientific method.

    Scott
     
  26. JamesSX2_7

    JamesSX2_7 Australia Iron Registered Member

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    Hello, I'm new here - so go easy on me :)

    I have a Seig SX2.7 Milling machine and have had one for 9 months now.
    I'm a hobbyist, so my comments are based on never having seen or used a milling machine before.
    I wanted to buy a drill press, but thought a small milling machine would be handy - glad I got it now.

    Technically, this is the second machine as the first had a serious manufacturing fault. After a bit of mucking around trying to get it fixed, they swapped it over, but I didn't use the first one for the first 6 weeks or so.
    This one also developed a small fault - but it turned out to be a loose connector.
    Otherwise I am very happy with the machine.

    As for lifting it - beware. The listed weight is incorrect. The machine weighs about 120kgs, not 101kgs. They do not put in 34kgs of packaging! The label on the shipping crate does say 120kg nett.
    But, my brother and I could lift it onto the stand - not too bad for a pair of 40 something blokes.
    I did choose this over the SX3 as the SX3 is much heavier than I thought we could lift at over 160kg.

    Machine seems quite capable. I have used a 50mm face cutter with a 0.3mm depth of cut - no issues.
    I can end mill 12mm to about 0.5mm and edge mill 20mm material by 0.5mm also.
    I do not know if these figures are reasonable or maybe I'm just taking it too easy.

    I have mostly finished building a power feed for the X-axis. Winding back and forth while removing only 0.5mm at a time gets boring pretty quick.
    The power feed also turns the X-axis wheel at constant speed (hard to do manually) and much slower than I would.

    Have a proper vise on order. At the moment I'm using a freebee home made vise, but it isn't well made and occasionally lets a part go.
    I'm planning to turn it into an angle vise when the new one arrives.

    Hope this is helpful to someone, though is possibly too late for the original poster.

    James.
     
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  27. salindroth

    salindroth United States Steel Registered Member

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    Thanks for this report, James. Sounds like a good machine. I've used a power screwdriver with a hex socket as a poor man's power feed...
     
  28. JamesSX2_7

    JamesSX2_7 Australia Iron Registered Member

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    Hi Salindroth,

    I am quite happy with the machine, shame about the first issue and the time it took to resolve.
    Having a "hands free" power feed is handy. Lets me check measurements, sweep up or something while the machine does the cutting.

    I'm still to implement the automatic end stops, to prevent crashing the table, or milling past the area wanted.
    Hope to get to these soon - as soon as I have a useful vise!
    Thought I'd attach a photo. Have since changes the screws, as metal was too thin to countersink.

    James. 20160723_110748_small.jpg
     
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  29. salindroth

    salindroth United States Steel Registered Member

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    I just saw the YouTube video of the power feed in action. Nice work, James!

    I took the plunge and ordered the SX2.7 from LMS.

    Scott
     
  30. salindroth

    salindroth United States Steel Registered Member

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    The SX2.7 arrived yesterday. I got a duct jack from a local equipment rental center, and my son and I got the mill up to the workbench without any problem. In fact, getting the duct jack in and out of my small SUV was far more challenging than putting the mill in place.

    The mill is beautiful. Fit and finish are very good, and clean up did not take long. One thing I learned is that it does not like my GFCI outlets. The interrupter would trip as soon as the motor started turning. Chris from LMS told me to use a regular outlet because "These machines turn your AC into DC, then reassemble it to 3-phase. The phase shift unbalances the hot and neutral."

    I ran in the spindle bearings at 600, 800, 1000 rpm for 10 minutes at each speed. Right now the spindle gets very warm, so maybe it will take some time before the bearings settle in. Or maybe that's the way it's going to be. I measured 0.0005" TIR at the end.

    The head is pretty well trammed in. End milling along the x-axis leaves a nice moire pattern, and there's no ridge on the seam left by the return cut, which suggests the y-axis alignment with the table is pretty good as well. I'm glad that the factory settings are acceptable, because it's not yet clear to me how to tram the head.

    The LMS mill doesn't make an annoying beeping sound that Frank Hoose points out in his review (no chip guard to trigger the warning beep), and the control box has a dial to set the speed instead of +/- buttons. Much better IMO.

    Cranking the head up and down is a chore. Lots of people have pointed this out about the SX3, so it wasn't a surprise. My only complaint is that the instruction manual is extremely cursory. Frank Hoose's video review has been very helpful to me as I get to know the machine.

    So far I am happy customer. The SX2.7 is the perfect upgrade for my needs. It's is a lot beefier than a mini-mill, but the footprint is not overwhelming.

    Scott


    sx2.7_day01.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2016
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