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rung fu clone RF-45 ZX45 cnc conversion

fluvannabear

Iron
Registered Member
Well, back again. Finally got the electronics packaged and steppers mounted. So far all axes move in the right directions but, only at 25ipm reliably in X and Y. I have loosened the gibs as far as I dare but only has a minimal effect. Guess the NEMA23 425oz-in, 4.2A and 36Volt stepper/driver combo is too weak to work with the stock lead screws in X and Y but Z is happy as a clam at 50+ipm. Running the 2:1 gearing to get more torque at 8000 steps per inch. Of course these speeds are more than enough as a feed rate, was just hoping for more for rapids. Will post photos of setup when the replacement PS gets here for the desktop that has the pictures on it. Thanks for all the help so far. Take care. Burt
 
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jumps4

Global Moderator
Staff member
Active Member
good to hear you got her running.
the stock lead screws do take a lot of torque to turn, I tried that on my lathe conversion for a while and I wasn't that impressed.
keep us posted
Steve
 

fluvannabear

Iron
Registered Member
Steve: Thank you for the reply. I figured that might be a problem but will have to live with it for a while. Good that I am not trying to make money off production. Plan for now is to make sure it will run by repeating a rectangular table movement 16" in X and 4" in Y. Modified a program I found in the tutorial for Mach3, will run it through a number of 100 cycle repetitions. I think I have put more inches on the machine during testing than I have since I got it in 2008. Pretty pathetic. Will keep you-all posted on progress or lack of same. Take care. Burt
 
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fluvannabear

Iron
Registered Member
Got the power supply today so able to transfer pictures. Still running the rectangle to see if I can loosen up the X and Y axes. Hope the pictures load properly. Take care.
Burt

CONTROL PANEL.jpg CONTROL PANEL V2.jpg STAND.jpg DONE.jpg X AXIS.jpg Y AXIS.jpg Z AXIS.jpg
 
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fluvannabear

Iron
Registered Member
Thank you for kind words. Have covered the large hole in the door with some screening to keep critters out since I took the pictures. Now if I can figure out how to do multipass operations as well as adjust tool path based on tool diameter I can get into real trouble. The Mach3 manual talks about AUTOMATIC Z CONTROL but I cannot find the screen in my Mach3 installation. Just purchased it so am kinda of disappointed. Time will tell I guess. Hope to hear about more conversions of the G0484 or its equivalent. Take care.
Burt
 

bvd1940

Active User
Active Member
Well ifin you were to ask Steve I bet he would know the answer, as for me my 45 conversion hit the point where I got the parts to talk to one another and have been on the honeydoo list ever since the weather warmed up but the list is just about done:beer: so I might juist be able to get back to it:aok:
Oh well the beat goes on & on.
Bill
 

fluvannabear

Iron
Registered Member
Sounds like you are making progress, glad to hear that. Was testing repeatability on the x and y axes today when the y axis quit responding. The stepper would wiggle a bit but not making any noise, felt like the holding torque had dropped off. Hope to work on it come Monday. Found the x was within half a thou so am pretty happy with that. Stuck at 25ipm for now on x and (I hope) y. Take care of the honey do list first of all. Regarding my questions, found that multipass is covered by a Wizard within Mach3, however still don't know how to tell it to cut inside/outside/on centered on the line. CamBam allows selection of Inside/Outside but nothing about cutting centered on the line. Wonder if I have to offset drawing features to accommodate tool diameters before I generate G-code from a CAM program. Might not be too hard for simple stuff but seems like there has to be a better way. Will keep looking, who knows what I might find. Take care and keep us posted on progress, will do same.
Burt
 

fluvannabear

Iron
Registered Member
Hi Steve:
Well, solved the y-axis issue. Slipping pulley, used loctite this time should have done that the first time around. Have gotten rapids up to 35IPM but have to use a low acceleration rate (1 or so) to make it repeatable. Whole issue is using stock lead-screws and nuts. It started out sounding like an out of tune organ when x and y were running together, got it down to moderate buzz when an axis reversed, then finally it is almost silent when I run my 16" x 4" rectangle 5 times in a loop. Still have to see if the motors have enough torque to actually cut a piece of steel but that will come later. More tests to do such as see if it will draw circles, etc. before I put a tool in the spindle that is not a pen. Anyway, will keep you and the forum posted on my progress, such as it is. Take care.
Burt
 

Hendriks

H-M Supporter - Premium Content
H-M Supporter-Premium
Hello, probably i did not use the right search word but i did not find anything about traveling of the z-axis when powered off. Is this an issue and if, did somebody solve this. I was thinking about short circuiting the coils by means of a relay if necessary. regards
 

jumps4

Global Moderator
Staff member
Active Member
My Z axis has never moved when powered off.
I guess there is just enough drag on the dovetail to hold it in place
Steve
 

jbolt

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
We have this issue with our CNC router/mill that is driven by servos. Both my stepper systems don't do this.
 
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Hendriks

H-M Supporter - Premium Content
H-M Supporter-Premium
jumps4 and jbolt thank you very much. I will reserve some space for a brake but will not order one before realy needed. Somebody learned me that short circuiting the coils of the stepper will give a lot of resistence agains movement bur creep will remain.
 

GtG001

Iron
Registered Member
My Z axis has never moved when powered off.
I guess there is just enough drag on the dovetail to hold it in place
Steve
Hi Steve,
I have followed your lead with stepper motor choice on my ZX7045 CNC conversion and was wonder about your coupling choice for the Z axis. I seem to remember that you changed the coupling at one time (if my memory is correct). Can I ask what you went with in the end please?
For the Z axis, I have considered making a solid steel coupling with a light press fit on the motor and a firm push fit on the screw secure with grub screws - do you think there would be a problem with not have any flexi in the coupling if I align the motor/screw correctly?

Regards,
Allan
 

jumps4

Global Moderator
Staff member
Active Member
Hello Allen
The one I used for Z looks like this one on Ebay " 141122463628 " it is a diaphragm type
So far it has held up more than a couple years without an issue.
I tried a ridged coupling on my lathe it did not work out well.
Steve
I think the one I found had a clamp screw and a set screw to hold the shaft. This one shows only the clamp screw.
s-l1600.jpg
 

jbolt

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
I have added set screws to the clamp type couplers. For shafts with flats I use blunt end set screws, for round shafts I use pointed set screws and drill a detent in the shaft with the same point angle.

Jay
 

GtG001

Iron
Registered Member
Hello Allen
The one I used for Z looks like this one on Ebay " 141122463628 " it is a diaphragm type
So far it has held up more than a couple years without an issue.
I tried a ridged coupling on my lathe it did not work out well.
Steve
I think the one I found had a clamp screw and a set screw to hold the shaft. This one shows only the clamp screw.
View attachment 129186
Thanks Steve. I was worried that the 4200 oz motor might have too much torque for the standard style coupling. I have seen many people use the spider style flexible coupling and when checking on the torque rating, it was under rated for the 4200 oz motor.
What problems did you have on your lathe with the solid coupling, if you don't mind me asking?

Regards,
Allan.
 

jumps4

Global Moderator
Staff member
Active Member
sorry I didn't reply sooner Allan
I didn't receive a notice you had messaged me back, my notices keep getting wiped out.
the problem I think was with the end of the ballscrew where they machined it. I don't believe they were perfectly centered.
Also holding the screw too ridged left tool marks in my work for every imperfection in the rotation of the screw and movement of the saddle.
I have dead headed the 4200 to where it just bangs without damaging the coupling or slip.
miss a decimal point in a line of code and you will see what I mean lol
Steve
 
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GtG001

Iron
Registered Member
sorry I didn't reply sooner Allan
I didn't receive a notice you had messaged me back, my notices keep getting wiped out.
the problem I think was with the end of the ballscrew where they machined it. I don't believe they were perfectly centered.
Also holding the screw too ridged left tool marks in my work for every imperfection in the rotation of the screw and movement of the saddle.
I have dead headed the 4200 to where it just bangs without damaging the coupling or slip.
miss a decimal point in a line of code and you will see what I mean lol
Steve
Thanks Steve for the reply. I did read your lathe project in the last few days and I understand what you said. Thank you for all the research you have done with the Mill conversion. As I look at other conversions and consider them for my conversion, I can see that you have made some good choices with your selection and find that I have not been able to improve much on them. It is such a nice thing to have someone with similar style as normally I am paving a different path to what others take and that usually means a harder path.

Best regards,
Allan. :)
 

GtG001

Iron
Registered Member
Thanks Steve for the reply. I did read your lathe project in the last few days and I understand what you said. Thank you for all the research you have done with the Mill conversion. As I look at other conversions and consider them for my conversion, I can see that you have made some good choices with your selection and find that I have not been able to improve much on them. It is such a nice thing to have someone with similar style as normally I am paving a different path to what others take and that usually means a harder path.

Best regards,
Allan. :)
Hi Steve,
After doing a little more research, I noticed that the Tormach 1100 Mill uses solid steel couplings on it's axis to motor connections. This makes sense to me if you have the alignment correct, it should work. Hopefully, I will be able to get the alignment correct. :)
 

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