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Recommendations For Grizzly Accessories For New G0602??

Discussion in 'GRIZZLY INDUSTRIAL INC.' started by Mark Stonich, Oct 14, 2016.

  1. Mark Stonich

    Mark Stonich United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I'm about to order my G0602 and I'm trying to decide what to include in the order.
    So far I've come up with;
    T10166 Quick Change Tool Post Kit.
    G1677 JT3/Mt3 Drill Chuck Arbor
    G5687 MT3 Live Center

    Is there any reason to avoid any of the above?

    Is there anything else I should add?
     
  2. Ulma Doctor

    Ulma Doctor Infinitely Curious Active Member

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    nice!
    maybe some HSS tool blanks and some practice pieces!!!
    you'll have hours of fun!!!
     
  3. DHJ

    DHJ United States Iron Registered Member

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    Sounds like a good start, maybe throw in some center drills, dial indicator and stand, tooling never ends. The fun starts with all the mods. that can be done to the 602 to lmprove the performance.
     
  4. RJSakowski

    RJSakowski H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I bought the same QCTP when I bought my 602. It works well. You will most likely want to add additional tool holders and I would recommend buy them from Shars e-bay site. They are less expensive and better quality. If you want to use 1/2" tooling, you will find that the Grizzly tool holders won't go at or below the spindle center axis. The Shars 250-101-XL holderts are meant for 5/8" tools, max. and will dip slightly below the centerline.

    Rather than the G5687 live center I would spring for the extra and go with the G988 long nose center. I have the G9362 which is similar to the one you are looking at and the large bearing housing sometimes gets in the way.

    Add a drill chuck to the package if you don't already have one. I have a G8234 keyless chuck which has worked well. You would need to select a different arbor for it.

    Aside from those items, you should probably select a set of tool bits. I would recommend HSS to start as they can be ground much easier than carbide. You may want to select both though. Center drills in various sizes, a set of drills; fractional by 1/64" to 1/2" or a full set of fractional, number and letter drills. I have had a bad experience with the Grizzly H8183 set; mismarked, crooked, and brittle drills though. For boring, I have used boring tool sets intended for boring heads. One of the tool holders will accommodate 1/2" shank boring tools.

    As mentioned above, dial or test indicators, calipers, and micrometers are almost required for working on the lathe.
     
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  5. Fabrickator

    Fabrickator United States Active User Active Member

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    I'm not familiar with their QTCP, but the cost is suspiciously inexpensive. When dealing with machine tools and tooling, you sort of get what you pay for. I do know that many people use the Phase II QTCP, including myself. It's about twice the cost for a set at $300. Then there's Aloris (high end) at $800. So, my advice is to think about what it is you'll be doing and what quality you want to invest in and use. Better to buy it once than replace everything in the future. The G0602 uses AXA size QTCP.

    I bought a smaller QTCP set for my first little Atlas lathe from Little Machine Shop and the handle broke off pretty quickly and I was always disappointed with it. When I sold the lathe I told the guy he can just have it... along with the old lantern style holder.

    Definitely need a 1/2" chuck w/adapter, but there again, there are Chinese crap and better ones. I prefer Jacobs keyless for a good chuck that wont slip on you. Buy keyless and you'll never go back. Usually, the cheaper chucks round off the tightening teeth pretty quickly. Once that happens, a new chuck key won't bring it back.

    For a live center, I prefer the double angle type. Sometimes you need that little bit extra extension and clearance on close work.

    Several sizes of center drills, I use the smaller ones more often than a large one. You don't want a big'ol, deep hole in everything you'll be working on. Just enough to get a good surface to center on.

    Measuring tools for sure. You'll probably use digital calipers for most work unless your fitting something to very close tolerances. This is where you can save some money. I have a couple of digital calipers from Harbor Freight (or most anywhere) that work just fine. You'll also be needing to mount an extra one if you want the tail sock to provide accurate depths. It wouldn't hurt to get a cheap dial indicator with mag base, although it's not something you'll use everyday.

    Digital height indicator: Grizzly has the one I have. Not too expensive, but terrifically easy for setting your tool bit height is seconds. Most of the time, I leave mine set on center height, set it on the cross slide and adjust the tooling to match. Correct tool bit height is soooo important.
    http://www.grizzly.com/products/0-6-Digital-Fractional-Height-Gauge/T21576?utm_campaign=zPage

    DRO's - make this a priority to be a better machinist. Sure you can get by the old school way, but for quick-learning accuracy, DRO's are the way to go. I bought mine on Grizzy's site for fairly cheap. Easy to mount.

    Some HSS bits, I prefer 1/4" and grind them myself. I also recommend a 5 piece set of 3/8" tri-carbides. You don't need 1/2" for most anything unless your hunkering down on some heavy cuts of steel. I got a drawer full of unused 1/2" tool bits.

    Good T-handle allen/ hex-screw set(s) Metric and US/SAE.

    As for modifications, be sure to check out mine on this link:

    http://www.projectsinmetal.com/forum/general-discussion/diary-of-a-new-g0602/page-4/#p13336

    I've been a G0602 Owner for 4 or 5 years now. You can make some really nice projects on this lathe. Low maintenance, never breaks down. Parts are available from Grizzly quick and cheap.

    Rick
     
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  6. gerritv22

    gerritv22 Active User Registered Member

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    Oil cans so that you can lubricate the oil points. One for headstock bearings, the other for everything else. Lubricate once a day before using machine.
     
  7. Glenn Brooks

    Glenn Brooks H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    +1 on a nice DRO. Also, a set of decent set of outside (and inside micrometers) are essential for turning accurate round work. 1", 2", and 3" are the ones I use the most. Almost never use a caliper anymore, except the old manual types for grabbing ID from larger inner surfaces. eBay is your friend on these. Just need patience to wait for nice instruments at the price you want.

    On second thought you might want to find a decent, maybe used, bench grinder and buy a good grinding wheel specifically for use in grinding HSS lathe bits. General purpose wheels have a poor/unsuitable adhesive material that holds the wheel grit together and builds up a lot of excessive heat when forming your cutting edges. For 40-50-60 bucks or so you can find a purpose made 6" or 8" wheel for tool grinding. Makes all the difference when dressing your bits.

    Have fun with your new machine!

    Glenn
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2016
  8. xman_charl

    xman_charl Active User Active Member

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    my holder

    3/8 tool bit
    1/2 carbide

    cheap lathe, but has cut a lot of metal

    P1010686.JPG




    Charl
     
  9. paoldschool

    paoldschool United States Iron Registered Member

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    A mighty mag comes to mind... They are always handy on any lathe. A tap follower and a tail stock die holder are also very helpful. Good for you on your lathe purchase, I have had one for about a year now and made all kinds of good stuff with it!!! Make friends with your local metal supply place, that way they will let you go into their scrap bins and find lots of practice parts!!!
     
  10. tmarks11

    tmarks11 Active User Active Member

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    I would recommend you look for a wedge type QCTP, only a few bucks more. The one you show from Grizzly is a piston type, not as accurate when swapping out tool holders.

    Phase II gets good reviews, which is what man showed in his post. The following is the wedge type, phase II also has the piston type, so make sure you are getting the right one. My shopping cart says it is $186, because my enco account carried over. If you can't get that price, then shop elsewhere (like shars below):
    https://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/09044116?item=09044116

    Shars also sells wedge type:
    http://www.shars.com/products/toolh...quick-change-tool-post-set-wedge-type-111-axa

    For the live center, recommend you spend $10 more and get a long-nose live center. Easier to get to hold the part and actually turn it.
    http://www.grizzly.com/products/G9888?utm_campaign=zPage
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2016
  11. Mark Stonich

    Mark Stonich United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Thanks for all the tips. I'm sure I'll have more questions once I get it up and running.

    A few questions:
    Do you get your oils from Grizzly?

    Paoldschool,
    What's a "mighty mag"?

    Fabricator,
    90% of what I'll be doing with it requires no measurement at all, so I'll hold off on a DRO for now.

    Glenn,
    I have several bench grinders. But a quick google search didn't find wheels especially for HSS. Any suggestions how I can narrow my search?

    Gerritv,
    I'm confused about your comment about a separate oilcan for the headstock bearings. From the manual it looks like all ball oilers take an ISO 32 lube.

    I already have a lot of the items mentioned. I should have mentioned I've been using a 1938 SB 9" for 30 years. But I've never cut threads. When I bought it the seller gave me a box of gears he said were change gears for threading. But they were just a bunch of random gears that didn't fit. By the time I figured it out he had left town.
     
  12. Baithog

    Baithog United States Florida Machinist Group Moderator H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I have had both piston and wedge type tool posts and much prefer the wedge.

    I got my first order of oil from Grizzly. I think the current jugs are from Rural King. The gearbox takes Mobile DTE Heavy-Meadium, which is ISO-68 hydraulic oil. The ball oilers take ISO 32 hydraulic oil. You can get both from a variety of marine, industrial, or farm suppliers. The trouble will be finding one that will handle gallon jugs. Enco, now MSC, used to. I gave up on the hydraulic oils for the ways and got some Vectra II. It does a far better job of staying in place and preventing sweaty fingerprints. I put pipe fittings on the gearbox to make changing oil easier, but it's not like you are going to be doing it all that often. I use a large screw top pill bottle and a chip brush to spread the way oil around. The pump oiler is only needed for the ball oilers.

    HSS tool bits are my work horses. You can grind HSS with the grey silicon carbide wheels from the box store, but they are not the best. I use a #60 S/C wheel for roughing, mostly because I haven't worn it out yet. I use an aluminum oxide (white) wheel #100 I think for finish. It has been a long time since that wheel has been off the grinder. I have heard good things about the pink wheels, but haven't used one. You will also need a diamond hone or hard arkansas stone to get the tool really sharp. I do not use HSS on mystery metal or hard to turn stuff. I got a set of 3/8 indexable tools from CDCO. They sell a set that comes with a boring bar. I use that bar a lot.
     
  13. Glenn Brooks

    Glenn Brooks H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Sounds like you have the equipment to set up,a dedicated grinder. Aluminium oxide wheels are supposed to work well for grinding HSS. Not sure about grit- maybe 60-80 grit.

    Also just read up on CBN wheels. These are the Caddilac of wheels - right up their with diamond wheels apparently. They are a synthetic wheel with fine Cubic Boron Nitride 120 grit crystals. Apparently these last forever and produce no heat when grinding HSS. So ideal for cutters and drill bits. They are a bit spendy- $100 to $250 and up on eBay. But seem to have excellent reviews.

    Glenn
     
  14. tmarks11

    tmarks11 Active User Active Member

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    Mobile Vacta II for ways, I use Mobile DTE Light (which is ISO 32) for headstock, in your case you would use DTE Heavy-Medium (ISO 68).

    Used to buy it from enco when they had the 20% off + free shipping.

    Now that Enco = MSC, so it probably won't be quite as good a deal (link below show $18/gallon for me for Vacta II, $23/gallon for DTE):

    http://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/60002151?fromRR=Y

    http://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/00265462
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2016
  15. AIrlineRefueler

    AIrlineRefueler United States Iron Registered Member

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    I am curious as to the tool size I did buy 2 different sets of the 3/8 bits from grizzly but even when I shim them to half inch they are still below the centerline on my g0602 on both ends , I am just setting up mine and it was made in 2007. Lathe cover says 3/8s tool size max but all my papers that came with it say 1/2 max . I am using the tool holder that came with it. Did I just get lucky ? it looks like i may still need to shim up about 1/16 of a inch more to be on center . Aaron
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2017
  16. RJSakowski

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    If you are using the 602 OEM 4-way tool holder, the maximum tool size will be that tool for which the cutting edge is at or below the spindle center line. The design of the 4-way will determine this. It is possible that an earlier version of the 4-way wouldn't permit mounting a 1/.2" tool below the center line. The next smaller size tool is 3/8". Grizzly has been known to make design changes in their products and not update their documents.
    You will need to shim the 1/2" tool to get correct cutting height. That is the reason that I purchased a QCTP. I didn't like having to shim.
     
  17. AIrlineRefueler

    AIrlineRefueler United States Iron Registered Member

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    Ok that makes sense I am just a beginner using the lathe but it looks like on mine I will be able to use the 1/2 inch bits too, another tool post will have to wait for a while. The main reason I bought mine was to face and adjust shoulders on some old mauser rifle barrels and practice threading for them for receivers. And do some barrel work ,the bore on the spindle is just big enough for most of these old mauser barrels. My first project is going to be making a outside spider and to find a few 55 degree whitworth threading bits. Thanks for that advice. Aaron
     
  18. xman_charl

    xman_charl Active User Active Member

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    use these, front holder, is used the most. ebay

    Back holder, 1/2 shank from Grizzly

    P1010748.JPG shars.png


    Charl
     

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