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Question on lathe cutting tools

Yellowshaker

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#1
I have the 7x16 micromark lathe. I use a variety of turning tools including indexible and HSS. I recently stumbled on a youtube video of this cutter and was looking for information from anyone who has used one on a small lathe comparable to mine. It seems expensive when the indexible sets can be bought for around 30 bucks. Just curious to your thoughts on this tool and the pros of owning it. Thanks.

http://www.eccentricengineering.com...emart&page=shop.browse&category_id=8&Itemid=3
 

JimDawson

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#2
I don't see any advantage to using an expensive tool holder for your application. I have been using only the finest cheap (about $2) brazed carbide and HSS tool bits for years. You can grind them for any needed shape.
 

brino

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#3
Bay-Com sells what I believe is a similar tool in the US (http://bay-com.com/)
They advertise in a couple of the magazines I get.

They claim you can turn and face with the same tool, and since there is only one face to grind re-sharpening is easier.

It looks interesting......and I may try a home-made copy of it....when I get some spare time......
In fact, I have already worked out the math to make it a 60 degree point, so you could turn, face and thread with one tool.
<sigh> I need to retire so I can spend my days playing!

-brino
 

Yellowshaker

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#4
Yep, bay-Com is their USA distributor. I kind of agree with JimDawson on the cheap cutters. Just curious what other guys think of this thing.
 

Doubleeboy

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#6
Bought one of those Bay-Com tangential tools about 12 years ago. Looked snazzy and simple. It is my least used tool. I don't like having to flip my tool holder around and to get good facing , roughing and finishing cuts you need to in my experience. Much easier to just grind a proper tool, following Mikey's great thread on sharpening and save a bunch of money and get better results. If you want to try tangential turning I believe there are some homemade designs on you tube that will get you there.
 

Nogoingback

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#7
I bought one of those tools a while back for my 10" Logan. While I haven't used it much, my experience so far has been positive.
As you probably noticed in the video it
can be used for facing and turning without changing the tool position which is handy. It also seems rigid in operation and because
the tool and holder have a lot of mass it absorbs heat well.
Since it uses a piece of tool steel there's a limit to the nose radius you can get and of course there's only
one set of "angles" you can get from it, so those factors are limiting. (Though you can grind a round piece of tool steel
and use that for a larger radius.). You might find it's useful
for roughing out. As far as cost, the tool is expensive but the tooling is cheap: one piece of tool steel could last a hobbyist
a long time and of course they're dead easy to sharpen as long as you own a grinder.

As I gain more experience using it I'll know more of course, but so far I'm happy with it, and
I'm coming around to the viewpoint that it makes a decent general purpose tool that's quick and easy to deal with.
However, if you already own insert tooling and grind HSS, you may not gain anything by buying one.
 
Last edited:

mikey

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#8
I don't own a tangential tool and have no business sticking my nose in here but I wanted to tell you why I don't own one. A lot of guys like this tool because it is easy to grind and it works. Some of our members own one and seem to really like it, and the vast majority of comments on them have been positive. I think for a new guy who doesn't know how to grind a HSS tool, it is a good option.

I don't own one because I think it is really expensive for what it is. It restricts you to one single geometry for everything and every material; as we know, optimal results require grinding the tool to suit the material so I didn't like this aspect of the tool. I also prefer a tool that will allow me to rough and then size accurately while producing a good finish; for that, I need to be able to adjust the lead angle of the tool and the tangential tool does not allow for that.

You say you already use HSS tooling so I assume you can already grind a good tool. If that is so then I don't see that a tangential tool will give you more than you already have.
 

Bob Korves

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#9
I used one helping a friend who was having finish and accuracy problems with his Atlas 10" lathe. First, I had to tighten and adjust all the things that were incorrect and which led him to the purchase of the tangential tool. After we got the lathe dialed in properly, the tangential tool cut fine, but I could see how the design of it would get in the way for many common cuts, and not be very adaptable, as Mike pointed out.. The standard tooling also magically started to work well after getting the lathe set up properly. I do not see a place in my shop for a tangential tool, I have other tooling that does everything it does and lots more.
 
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