1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. PLEASE: Read the FORUM RULES BEFORE registering!

    Dismiss Notice

Proper size Tee nuts for 9x49 Bridgeport

Discussion in 'BRIDGEPORT MACHINES INC. & B'PORT CLONES' started by Billy Dixon, May 23, 2017.

  1. Billy Dixon

    Billy Dixon United States Iron Registered Member

    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    3
    City:
    White Deer
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    Greetings, this is my first post and I'm sure you'll pick up I'm a newb to the wonderful world of machining. I'm the proud owner of a 9x49 2j2 Bridgeport and in the process of getting it up and going. I'm a little perplexed about the proper size tee nuts for this mill. The slots in the ways measure 5/8'' and a 5/8" bolt fits snug. What is the proper size? 9/16" or 1/2"? Thanks in advance for any help. More new guy questions to follow I'm sure.

    BD
     
    Ulma Doctor likes this.
  2. Bob Korves

    Bob Korves H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    3,821
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    USA
    City:
    Sacramento
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    The BP mill uses 5/8" T-nuts, which are threaded for 1/2" bolts.

    Welcome to Hobby Machinist!
     
  3. Billy Dixon

    Billy Dixon United States Iron Registered Member

    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    3
    City:
    White Deer
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    Thanks Bob,
    That's what I was leaning toward, just wasn't sure. Going to buy a couple and make my own after that. Gotta start somewhere!

    BD
     
    Ulma Doctor and rdean like this.
  4. Bob Korves

    Bob Korves H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    3,821
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    USA
    City:
    Sacramento
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    I really enjoy using the t-nuts I made myself, for all of my machines, rotary table, etc. I can make them so they fit better than anything I have purchased, and they just seem to slide in the t-slots better. Distort the bottom thread, or do not tap quite all the way through, so you do not run studs and bolts down into the bottom of the t-slots, which can cause damage.
     
    Ulma Doctor and uncle harry like this.
  5. Bob Korves

    Bob Korves H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    3,821
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    USA
    City:
    Sacramento
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    You don't really need to buy a couple. Looking at a photo in a catalogue or online will give you the design and approximate sizes needed. The thing to watch out for with t-nuts is that they are not made too tall. They will pull up to the shoulders when tightened, and the top can then protrude above the table if you are not careful. Then it never tightens to the table. It is good to finish them even a bit lower than that, so accumulated swarf is less of an issue. Yours will not be hardened, but unless you are using them full time, that is not much of an issue. They also might be a little less strong than the hardened ones, but they do not need to be tightened that hard anyway, or you will risk damaging the table.
     
    Ulma Doctor likes this.
  6. Billy Dixon

    Billy Dixon United States Iron Registered Member

    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    3
    City:
    White Deer
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    Thanks for the tips. I ordered a couple to get my vise tied down, after that I'll make my own. I'll be sure and check the height. Never thought about causing damage by protruding too far, great advice!
     
  7. EmilioG

    EmilioG United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    296
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    HUNTINGTON
    State:
    New York

    -Return to Top-

    For mill vises, I've seen machinists use bronze bolts and nuts with the T slot nuts.
     
    Ulma Doctor likes this.
  8. itsme_Bernie

    itsme_Bernie United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    73
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    NNJ
    City:
    NNJ
    State:
    New Jersey

    -Return to Top-


    Congrats Billy!

    I just sold my beloved Hardinge with a Rusnok head and found myself a Bridgeport as well.
    One common issue with many milling machine tables is the distortion of the table and T slots from people cranking on mounting bolts over the years. You may just need to run a file inside the slot, not deep down where the top of the "T", obviously the T slot is an upside down "T". You need to run the file against the 5/8 inch surfaces, flat against those surfaces. This will take burrs, distortions, and any other imperfections caused over the years of hard work and smooth them out and make the T-nuts slide through much more freely.





    .
    Bernie
     
    Ulma Doctor likes this.
  9. Billy Dixon

    Billy Dixon United States Iron Registered Member

    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    3
    City:
    White Deer
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    Thanks Bernie, I'll check that out. My Bridgeport is a vintage 1977 complete with a Bausch and Lomb DRO. Pretty snazzy technology for 40 years ago. Got my first digital watch about the same year. I'm forth owner. First was a One man machine shop. Second owner was also a machine shop where it sat in storage for several years before the 3rd owner bought it at auction I bought it from him because he has access to a mill at work and it opened up a 3rd slot in a nice garage. The third owner had cleaned on it some and I spent the better part of 2 weeks scrubbing on it. looked like a couple gallons of 30 wt. and a lot of dust. Its finally operational, sounds better that the machines I got to run at the college where I got a semester working on a similar Bridgeport. I bit the bullet and bought a Kurt vise, it sure looks pretty sitting on it, and I am working on a DRO rack.

    Thanks to all for the tips and tricks, looking forward to learning more.
     
    Ulma Doctor and itsme_Bernie like this.
  10. jmarkwolf

    jmarkwolf United States Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    114
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Southeast Michigan
    City:
    Pinckney
    State:
    Michigan

    -Return to Top-

    Be advised that the table slots can accumulate a thickness of grime that can prevent standard 5/8in t-nuts from sliding the length of the slots sometimes.

    Just needs a good cleaning/brushing/scraping to clear them.
     
    expressline99 and Ulma Doctor like this.
  11. Alittlerusty

    Alittlerusty Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    85
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    Plympton
    State:
    Massachusetts

    -Return to Top-

    After you thread your tee nuts it's a good idea to damage the bottom thread so it stops your bolts
    From damaging the bottom of your table slots
     
    Ulma Doctor likes this.
  12. Ulma Doctor

    Ulma Doctor Infinitely Curious Active Member

    Likes Received:
    3,050
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Ethereal Plane
    City:
    Tracy
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    Hi Billy,
    congratulations on getting the mill
    we'd love to see pictures!
     
  13. jmarkwolf

    jmarkwolf United States Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    114
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Southeast Michigan
    City:
    Pinckney
    State:
    Michigan

    -Return to Top-

    Be advised the table slot width can accumulate grime and crud over the years such that a 5/8in t-nut will sometimes not be able to slide freely. Scraping and steel brushing the side walls of the slots will fix this.
     
  14. Billy Dixon

    Billy Dixon United States Iron Registered Member

    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    3
    City:
    White Deer
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    My Bridgeport has been scrubbed and oiled. I'll get some pictures up. It's a really cool machine.
     

Share This Page