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Potd - Project Of The Day- What Did You Do In Your Shop Today?

Discussion in 'PROJECT OF THE DAY --- WHAT DID YOU DO IN YOUR SHOP TODAY?' started by Nels, Mar 30, 2013.

  1. ch2co

    ch2co United States Grumpy Old Man H-M Supporter-Premium

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  2. ch2co

    ch2co United States Grumpy Old Man H-M Supporter-Premium

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  3. Franko

    Franko Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Those are beautiful, Greg!
     
  4. Cheeseking

    Cheeseking United States Active User Active Member

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    Dang. Beautiful work!
     
  5. hman

    hman Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Truly beautiful work there, Greg! Look out, Gerstner.
     
    intjonmiller likes this.
  6. hman

    hman Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Back in 2015, Brooks Ravenscroft (brav65) posted about using magnetic vent covers from Home Depot as milling machine table covers.
    http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/way-cover-t-slot-cover.37227/
    kimage.jpg
    As Brooks said, "They are magnetic and can be cut to fit any size you want. They stick to the table but are easy to remove. The best part is they were under $4 for a package of 3."

    I just thunk up a new use for these. Needed to touch up some parts on the belt sander that were vulnerable to being scratched. I can clean all the grit off the table, but the cast iron table itself would scratch the parts as I slid them across.

    So I found my stock of vent covers and cut one to the size of the belt sander table. Easy to keep clean, because you can remove it and take it to the sink for a thorough washing.
    kHPIM4835.jpg kHPIM4836.jpg

    PS - I think these would also be useful to cover lathe ways when tool post grinding. Because they're magnetic, there's little or no danger of their lifting upward and being caught by the rotating chuck. And being magnetic, they'll catch at least some of the (ferrous) swarf.
     
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  7. Boswell

    Boswell United States Hobby Machinist since 2010 H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Truly Awesome work Greg.
     
  8. RJSakowski

    RJSakowski H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Greg, no way I would be able to have those in my shop. As soon as my wife saw them, they would be confiscated. Beautiful workmanship!
     
    intjonmiller likes this.
  9. 38Bill

    38Bill United States Active Member Active Member

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    Very nice Greg! Not sure how you are going to remember what drawer contains what. I'm know I would end up opening every drawer and of course the tool I was looking for would be the last one no matter where I started.
     
  10. brino

    brino Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I think you mean "Finely Finished!"

    From antique logging boats, thru firewood processing machines and now fine furniture.
    Greg you are a Renaissance man.

    -brino
     
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  11. dlane

    dlane Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Nice Job Greg, 350 what would one of them cost? .
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2017 at 10:19 PM
  12. roadie33

    roadie33 Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Finally finished installing the DRO on the G0704 Mill tonight.
    That Y axis is a PITA to do.
    Very little vertical surface to mount the read head brackets to. Ended up using a piece of Delrin to screw to the side of the Y Dovetail, machined a step on the Mill side for clearance to base and a 58 degree angle on the other, had to be careful and only drill .375" deep into the Y Dovetail. Then a piece of 3/8" Delrin from the block to the read head, slotted for adjustment.
    The Z and X were pretty easy and took maybe an hour for each with the drilling and tapping taking the longest.
    Overall I am very happy with the DRO and it is very accurate. For $251.60 shipped, I am not going to complain to much.
    I'll have to figure out all the functions before I use it to it's full potential.

    upload_2017-3-19_22-41-23.png

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  13. stioc

    stioc United States Iron Registered Member

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    Built a manual crank for my new 9x20 lathe this afternoon. The lowest the spindle turns is 130rpm so this should come in handy for taps and dies. I'm a newbie when it comes to machining so go easy on me :)

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I used my Craftsman bench top drill-press with a small x-y Wilton vise to drill and tap (manually turning the chuck) the holes on the spindle nut as well as the matching holes on the crank handle. Worked quite nicely, who needs a mill? :dunno: Oh I did shape the crank body with my RF30 mill to make sure it saw some use too :lol:
     
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  14. hman

    hman Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Pretty good crank. If I were you, though, I'd put an acorn nut over the raw end of the threaded rod at the handle. Easier on the hands that way!
     
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  15. Martin W

    Martin W Canada H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Greg, That looks great. We are always looking for cabinetmakers, if you are ever interested.
    cheers
    Martin
     
  16. ndnchf

    ndnchf United States Active Member Active Member

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    Just thought I'd show the stand I made for my chop saw. I keep it in the garage, but roll it out into the driveway to use. So I made this simple wheeled stand. The stand has its own extension cord coiled on the back and an outlet box on the back so an angle grinder can be plugged in to clean up the chopped edges. The framework around the saw holds it in place, but still allows it to be lifted off for use where the stand is not practical. It works very well for me.
    Chopsaw.jpg
     
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  17. f350ca

    f350ca Canada Active User Active Member

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    Thanks, really appreciate the comments. These have been on the to do list for a long time. Built the second one for one of the kids, I don't have enough bench space for two. Funny Bill I was thinking the same thing, maybe could use a felt marker to label the drawers. lol
    Gerstner is safe, I could have built two full size dressers in less time.
    Today Im back in the metal shop repairing the hood panels on a Case backhoe.

    Thanks
    Greg
     
  18. stioc

    stioc United States Iron Registered Member

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    That looks great and very useful. I have that HF chop saw too but was thinking of getting rid of it since it flexes so much, may I should bolt it down to a small stand like that. My neighbor has a RIGID one and it's way more, well, rigid compared to mine.
     
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  19. Skippyman

    Skippyman Canada Active Member Active Member

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    Wow, those are fantastic!
     
  20. roadie33

    roadie33 Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Got done with the DRO, now to fab up an air/coolant system for the Mill.
    This is what I have so far.
    1.5" x 3" Alum block. Cut a pocket and Epoxied in 3 - 3/4" square, rare earth magnets. Drill and tapped for the tube block and a regulator.
    Next is to figure out the rest of the piping to air tank. It uses 8mm tubing with press in fittings,( like shark bite plumbing fittings). I have over 20' of tubing. I so far have $18 in it.

    BTW is it possible to take the joints apart to shorten it?


    upload_2017-3-20_22-40-40.png

    upload_2017-3-20_22-41-10.png

    upload_2017-3-20_22-41-21.png

    upload_2017-3-20_22-41-54.png
     
  21. Billh50

    Billh50 Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Today I took a break from designing to do some lathe work on my indexer. Didn't get much done before the pain started. But did get to adjust the tail stock to where I only had less than a .001 of taper for 6 inches. Still have to take off about 3/8 of an inch on the diameter yet. Maybe do more tomorrow. While I was machining the spindle I realized I will have to buy a steady rest to finish it. Hopefully I will have enough extra at the end of the month to buy one.
     

    Attached Files:

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  22. woochucker

    woochucker United States Active Member Active Member

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    Nice work Greg, looks real nice.
     
  23. ddickey

    ddickey United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Made a new holder for my new old stock Teclock indicator. thumbnail_IMG_20170315_162536214.jpg thumbnail_IMG_20170315_162536214.jpg
     
  24. Cheeseking

    Cheeseking United States Active User Active Member

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    BTW is it possible to take the joints apart to shorten it?

    I believe so. They sell a special "pliers" to make popping the segments apart easier bit I'm thinking you can do it sans the tool with a little grunting.
     
  25. Cheeseking

    Cheeseking United States Active User Active Member

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    Nice work ddickey. Handy little gizmo.
     
  26. RJSakowski

    RJSakowski H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    The joints can be separated quite easily. A sharp bend will pop them. The pliers are for reassembling the joints. It can be done without the pliers but it is difficult.
     
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  27. Billh50

    Billh50 Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    While I was turning down more of the spindle yesterday. Yep, you guessed it. I decided to make a change on the design. It's been a while since I designed anything and I guess I forgot a few things.
    Made me wonder how many people change things from their original design as they go along.
     
  28. ch2co

    ch2co United States Grumpy Old Man H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Bill said "Made me wonder how many people change things from their original design as they go along.?

    Isn't that the way its supposed to happen? Takes all the fun out of it if you plan ahead too much.;)
     
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  29. RJSakowski

    RJSakowski H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I do more than I care to think about. Typically, I will model all but the simplest projects in SolidWorks before making any cuts so I have a fairly good idea of what the finished project will look like. This tends to reduce "engineering changes" greatly. However, there are numerous instances when I will realize that there is a better way to accomplish the task. Sometimes these result in gotcha's when they adversely affect a different part of the project.
     
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  30. T Bredehoft

    T Bredehoft Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    In the spirit of cleaning the shop? is there a usable 12V power supply inside an old CRT monitor? Before I consign it to the dump?
     

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