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Sloth2009

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Quick and easy work stop...

I was thinking about buying or making a work stop for the milling vise. I finally remembered I have an unused magnetic base that came with a grizzly dial indicator I bought some time ago. I wish I wouldn't forget half the stuff I already own! I cut off a piece of hardened 3/8" shafting to use as the adjustable sliding stop.

Seems like it will make a pretty usefull little tool. Mine is a Chinese mag base. You can buy a similar American made Mighty Mag on Amazon or Ebay for around $16. The Chinese ones can be found for about $10-$12.
IMG_6183.JPG IMG_6185.JPG
 
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9t8z28

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They are the same machine but the difference is they have a tilting column. Mine has a solid column that mounts like your PM with 4 bolts. The tilting column has a large bolt that the column pivots on. I have had both setups and the solid column is far better but still not perfect. Thanks for looking tho
 

navav2002

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I have looked at those Kodiak endmills but have not taken the plunge...Would be interested in a review once you have tried them out...
 

Sloth2009

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I haven’t used a lot of end mills in my short time with a mill. I had some 2 flute HSS end mills from Little Machine Shop and they were virtually unusable on my machine. They didn’t cut well even in brass and would nearly shake my machine apart when side milling. I have some ball nose 4 flute carbide end mills from Kodiak and have liked them so far. I like these new 5 flute carbide end mills even better. They cut like butter and have impart little vibration into the machine. So far I would have no problem recommending them. 6C6624C5-8A98-4348-888B-2D804198C220.jpeg E3E28D56-90C5-4857-A63C-302F4BE703E8.jpeg
 

wrmiller

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I found that the smaller mills will perform better with better quality end mills. And I fell in love with roughing (both coarse and fine) end mills as they can literally 'hog' material without shaking the machine to death. If need be, I would follow rougher cuts with a traditional end mill for a better finish on external surfaces.
 

Sloth2009

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I found that the smaller mills will perform better with better quality end mills. And I fell in love with roughing (both coarse and fine) end mills as they can literally 'hog' material without shaking the machine to death. If need be, I would follow rougher cuts with a traditional end mill for a better finish on external surfaces.
Any particular brands/sources you favor?
 

wrmiller

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Not really. I looked on Ebay a lot and bought US made end mills when I could afford them. Carbide and cobalt mostly as they seem to last longer.
 

Sloth2009

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Bought a shars 3” boring head and and HHIP indexible carbide insert boring bar. The boring head is supposed to be a bit better than most import heads. It is fully nickel plated and the lead screw is supposed to have less backlash than most. I used it to bore some id and od steel on some steel tubing so they all slide together along with a bronze bushing and steel shaft. Overall the machining went smooth for my first boring job. The surface finish was rough on some cuts most likely due to poor downfeed speed control on my behalf. I think I may loctite the removable R8 shank onto the head as it is hard to keep tight. A415676D-CFCC-4A89-8E97-5E401E5FD35F.jpeg 93C1E8CA-EB6F-4563-9832-12ECCA86D3D3.jpeg 72CA440D-EBA9-4D5E-B0E5-2D3020D964A8.jpeg C1B431F3-BB37-4751-908F-EE8CCB251AAF.jpeg
 

Bob Korves

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You can use a much larger diameter boring bar in that big of a hole, and will have more success with surface finish and with finishing to the desired size.
 

Sloth2009

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You can use a much larger diameter boring bar in that big of a hole, and will have more success with surface finish and with finishing to the desired size.
I think I will get one from Mesa Tools. American made and reasonably priced.
 

Bob Korves

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It is not so much that it is American or Chinese. Steel is steel, and it all has essentially the same stiffness, regardless of grade or hardness. If you want stiffer boring bars, you need to go bigger or go to carbide, which has a higher elastic modulus. Bigger is lots cheaper than carbide, and the hole in your pic shows room for a much bigger boring bar. Obviously, that is just the cutting tool I am speaking of. If there is flexibility or play in the machine or the boring head or the setup, it will cause much the same problems.
 

Sloth2009

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This project will eventually be an offset cam using pieces of steel tubing and a bronze sleeve bearing. The plan is for the cam to actuate a sledge hammer in a homade power hammer design. There are cam hammer designs online which typically use a large ball bearing with an off center shaft or a wooden spiral cam. I decided to design this cam a bit different because I belive it will be more robust and easier to repair and modify than others I have seen. I can also cut the cam “to length” as I see fit.

Today I drilled then bored the solid shaft with an off center hole which will provide 1.25” of total throw. I also drilled and tapped some holes for some 1/4-20 set screws. The 2 1/2” solid shaft slides over a 3/4” keyed shaft which will be eventually driven via a drill motor and some v-belt pulleys.
3BE11E8E-57E0-4F71-9C04-CE67D3572DCB.jpeg 5A6A08CE-4385-465F-ABE1-F297BA174939.jpeg FA11ED9A-55F2-49E5-A9F9-755B3AA43CB1.jpeg A2FAE984-9B9E-41A6-8EE1-BD4ACC11BD56.jpeg
 
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Sloth2009

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It is not so much that it is American or Chinese. Steel is steel, and it all has essentially the same stiffness, regardless of grade or hardness. If you want stiffer boring bars, you need to go bigger or go to carbide, which has a higher elastic modulus. Bigger is lots cheaper than carbide, and the hole in your pic shows room for a much bigger boring bar. Obviously, that is just the cutting tool I am speaking of. If there is flexibility or play in the machine or the boring head or the setup, it will cause much the same problems.
This is the one I am looking at from Mesa.
7B730442-E564-419A-A68A-0DE97A9CE53B.jpeg
 

Bob Korves

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This is the one I am looking at from Mesa.
View attachment 246486
I am not familiar with that boring bar and do not know the tool shank capacity of the boring head. If it is 3/4", then you would be gaining all you can by increasing the bar diameter, short of cutting down the shank of an even bigger one to fit the boring head. Length is also an issue. Any excess length length sticking out beyond what is needed to go through the bore of the work diminishes rigidity. I often run boring bars to within 1/4" or less of hitting the boring head, QCTP, or whatever is holding the bar. It makes a big difference in cutting ability, lack of chatter, and being able to finish to size without a bunch of spring passes that can easily go oversize.
 
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