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Playtime With Delrin: Bronze Replacement

Uglydog

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#2
Ulma,
Can you speak to the different kinds of Delrin and their features & benefits?
How does it compare to nylon?
Other plastics?

I've not done much plastics.

Thanks,
Daryl
MN
 

Ulma Doctor

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#3
i'm no expert by any means on the subject:
here is a link to different grades and uses of delrin
http://www2.dupont.com/Plastics/en_US/assets/downloads/design/DELDGe.pdf

nylon machines a little easier but doesn't have the toughness of delrin, at least the grades iv'e been exposed to.
nylon tends to be softer and gummier whereas delrin has a definite shear point not seen when machining nylon
sharp to rounded tools work well and you can remove .100" per side per pass easily with the right tooling on light machines

as far as comparing to other plastics, i'd say that delrin is one of the most stable and all around go to materials for making:
gears, spacers, low speed- no heat bushings, thrust washers, low strength nuts/bolts, non marring pin punches and drifts, bearing/seal installers, bench blocks,
and other uses that don't come right to mind

as long as the part stays relatively cool and the loads are moderate- i put delrin to use!:D
 
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Tony Wells

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#6
This is my go-to place for all things plastic (raw materials, and some fab work):

http://www.boedeker.com/mguide.htm

I know the owner, and have been doing business with them for many years. They are an excellent tech resource as well. Good one to bookmark. Besides, they are in Shiner, Texas.....home of a pretty decent brew.
 

Sandia

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#7
This is my go-to place for all things plastic (raw materials, and some fab work):

http://www.boedeker.com/mguide.htm

I know the owner, and have been doing business with them for many years. They are an excellent tech resource as well. Good one to bookmark. Besides, they are in Shiner, Texas.....home of a pretty decent brew.
Spotezl Brewery, Shiner Bock, one of my favorites. Looks like you know a good beer Tony.
 

Tony Wells

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#8
Ayup, I do like a Shiner now and then. I tend to favor darker beers when I do have one. Not often, but when I do, it's a dark of some kind.
 

chips&more

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#9
UD, you’re always on point! I picked up about 10 years ago a truck load of 1 1/2” thick plastic sheets. I was told it was Delrin? The price was so cheap I didn’t care what kind of plastic it was, but if it was all Delrin I hit a gold mine. There are sooooo many different kinds and grades of plastics. It looked like natural colored Delrin, machined like it, but didn’t hold up in use like it. So I did some homework. Found out that when you put a flame up to Delrin chips it will give off a smell similar to formaldehyde. This plastic I have does not do that. But it’s still good stuff and I use it more than steel/metal when making everything from jigs to arbor press pods…Dave
 

Ulma Doctor

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#10
Thank you Dave!
i found out that if you push too hard when turning delrin it will stink something fierce o_O
it's the formaldehyde being released!
you may have some nylon on your hands, it's just as useful IMO
nice score!
 

hman

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#11
It looked like natural colored Delrin, machined like it, but didn’t hold up in use like it. So I did some homework. Found out that when you put a flame up to Delrin chips it will give off a smell similar to formaldehyde. This plastic I have does not do that.
IIRC, chips or shavings of nylon smell a bit like burnt hair when lit. Polyethylene-family plastics (including polypro) burn readily with little smell. PVC tends to give off a sharp odor (from the chlorine). Both nylon and PVC will sink in water. Polyethylene/polypro will float. These are "first approximation" field tests I recall from my engineering days.
 

Ulma Doctor

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#12
Here is the actual "playing with delrin" the movie
if you got nothing better to do for the next 9:33, have a look!:D


thanks for watching and subscribing!
 

Ulma Doctor

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#13
i had some more playtime with Delrin last week,
there was a machine part damaged by an operator in a hurry, the emergency quickly got handed to me to pull a miracle from my bag of tricks
the picture below is a chute that deposits large chunks of meat into a chamber for automatic slicing and then portion control by weight
the chute was dropped and chipped away, i had to somehow make the chute function again in a hurry
here is my repair...
IMG_2490.JPG

i cut off the fractured end and made an end cap from 3/4" delrin instead of the 5/8" thickness supplied from the factory.
i located and bored a hole for an oilite bushing, and laid out the pin and bolt placement
i used .250" SS roll pins and 1/4-20 x 2" SS flat head machine screws to draw the unit together and give torsional strength too.
the end result was a repair that was way stronger than the original manufacture!

thanks for looking!
 

Tony Wells

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#15
That's just where some of the properties take a nose dive, typically. Can't say from memory which property in particular changes with that material at that temp, but I'm sure there are some graphs available that show tensile and yield, etc, at various temps.
 

Tozguy

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#16
Ah that makes sense, so the table only works in between those temps. Still, 50 deg.F is not that cold.
 

4gsr

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#17
Humm, I don't see Teflon listed even though it's considered a thermoplastic, It will handle temperatures from about -40 degree F to around 325 degrees F if filled with things like glass fiber, carbon, and a few other fillers used. Only problem at higher temperatures if pressure is involved, it will creep on you. There's another good thermoplastic, if you can afford it, is PEEK. I've done some pretty high temperature/pressure testing with this material in years past fantastic results.
 

Tony Wells

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#18
Teflon is hydrophilic to a degree and is not suitable for all applications, but is great for a lot of things.

I too like PEEK (polyetheretherketone) Works up to about 500°F IIRC. Structurally stout, electrically a good insulator and dimentionally stable. I have some on hand now in a few sizes and even tubing. Much cheaper than a piece of large solid round only to bore away. It is make by compression molding in custom tubes at a great savings over solid. I used to make some relatively large PEEK parts, and it is a little nerve wracking, when you have to buy the material, because as Ken says.....it ain't cheap.
 
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