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Pictures of things made in Home Shop CNC

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Poppey

Iron
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Hi I have added some photos of my CNC Slant Bed Lathe in the My CNC Slant Bed Lathe album. It is running om Mach3 and works fine. I need to change the break out board as it does not support treading. I need also to shim the spindel side plate to improve the the accuracy.
 

Poppey

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I added some 20 pix to the album but I´m not able to find them. May be I have not posted enough, this is my second post to the forum?? I read something about at least 3 posts before uploading so I will add one moer post:)
 

TomS

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I added some 20 pix to the album but I´m not able to find them. May be I have not posted enough, this is my second post to the forum?? I read something about at least 3 posts before uploading so I will add one moer post:)
Your pictures posted. Cool machine! We see a lot on CNC mills but not so much on CNC lathes. For the sake of us CNC nerds a write up on your build would be good reading.

Thanks for posting.
 

Boswell

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I must be missing something. I don't see any pictures.
 

Poppey

Iron
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I have previously build an CNC Router/3D printer and this was my fist experience with CNC. I like designing and figuring out how to do this and make that and finally building things.
I found a couple of DIY lathes on the internett and looked at "real machines", than I made the general specification and decided which components to use. I designed is in Inventor. To avoid stress in the steel I decided to build it without welding. In this design I figured it would be easier to get everything in alignement.

 

Poppey

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Machining the ribs. Drilled and tapped in the same set up. A lot of tapping . Here as well my X3 was used to the limit.
I milled the bottom of the side plates and the ribs in the mill but drilled with a magnetic drill. I hate not using the mill DRO. I used the frame as a work bench, heavy stuff
 

Poppey

Iron
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I used a two angle contact roller bearings on the chuck side and two ball bearings on the pulley side. The bearings sit partly in the side plates and in the spindel housing.
It turned out to be very solid and good solution.
 
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Poppey

Iron
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The spindel motor and belt mounted. It´s an SEW Eurodive 2,2 kW servo motor that I found on ebay. It was with a gear that I removed.
 

Poppey

Iron
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Here the frame for the ATC. Milling the index plate and tool holder was fun. This also used my X3 to the limit. Without the Division Master I would not have been able to do it.
 

Poppey

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Here are the X axis in place with the ATC with its stepper motor and cylinder.
I needed to replace the NEMA 23 double stack motor with a NEMA 23 with 18:1 gear box. I spent a lot of time getting the ATC to work properly.
 
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shooter123456

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I made all the mounting hardware for a CNC rebuild/scratchbuild ish on my X2 mill. That's 3 bearing blocks, 2 motor mounts, 2 ball nut mounts, and 1 motor extension. All the cutting was done on the X2 under CNC control.
zI64VsO.jpg

I am also working on a spindle light, some of the work was done manually on the lathe, but the drilling and cutting for the light recess was all done using CNC.
1wPOdRA.jpg
dU6fjUJ.jpg
 

shooter123456

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My small, but growing, collection of carbide insert holders were all made on the X2 under CNC control.

From top to bottom they are:

WNMT lathe tool in aluminum
CCGT lathe tool in 12L14 steel
Right hand DCMT lathe tool in aluminum
Center DCMT lathe thool in aluminum
Right hand DCMT lathe tool in aluminum

The end mill is a .625" 2 flute CCGT end mill with a .5" shank made out of 12L14 steel

 

cs900

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great work shooter! you're making the rest of us look bad though. haha.

on a side note, how well does the aluminum tool holder work? get any chatter from it? Also how much do you typically offset your screws for your inserts?
 

shooter123456

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great work shooter! you're making the rest of us look bad though. haha.

on a side note, how well does the aluminum tool holder work? get any chatter from it? Also how much do you typically offset your screws for your inserts?
Well thats nice to hear! :)

The aluminum works fine for lighter work. It works work turning aluminum and steels just fine, but if you push it too hard, it starts to deform the insert seat and it loosens up. Before that happens, there is no chatter that I can fault the tool holder for. It performs as well or better than the factory steel ones I have.

For the screws, I usually model it up and model the hole directly in the middle of the insert seat, then when I run it, I let the machine position itself, stop the program, off set it .003 to .005 (depending on insert size) toward the wall. Its been working well so far.
 

cs900

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interesting. Why not just model it with the offset and let the program/mill do all the work?
 

shooter123456

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interesting. Why not just model it with the offset and let the program/mill do all the work?
Initially, it was because I was having an issue with fusion getting it to model correctly (I can't remember what exactly the problem was though) and my mill had problems with losing its position so cutting the pocket then sticking the insert in and having it move to the center of the insert helped make sure it was position right.

Now, I could probably do it all the right way, but its a habit that stuck and I hadn't considered doing it any other way until just now...
 

cs900

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Alright shooter, i'm upping my game here.

Made some plastic injection molds the other day, and i feel like this needs explanation as i don't want to be known as the guy who makes fidget spinners for fun. I'm the vice-president of the triple cities makerspace and NY state contacted us to attend the NYS fair with an interactive booth. So I made these molds to work with our plastic injection molder. We used recycled plastic to make the spinner bodies and then let the kids assemble them. Lots of fun was had.


molds.jpg
 

shooter123456

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Alright shooter, i'm upping my game here.

Made some plastic injection molds the other day, and i feel like this needs explanation as i don't want to be known as the guy who makes fidget spinners for fun. I'm the vice-president of the triple cities makerspace and NY state contacted us to attend the NYS fair with an interactive booth. So I made these molds to work with our plastic injection molder. We used recycled plastic to make the spinner bodies and then let the kids assemble them. Lots of fun was had.


View attachment 240748
And you said it was me making you look bad... That's awesome!
 

MontanaAardvark

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I got my first little steam engine running yesterday. The CNC mill was basically a very nice drill press for locating the places to drill. That and squaring the stock. The majority of the project was manual lathe work, turning the flywheel and smaller, but more fiddly crank wheel (you literally cut away something like 80% of the aluminum you start with).


It was very cool to have it start running once I gave the flywheel a good flick.
 
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