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Pictures of things made in Home Shop CNC

cs900

maker of chips
Active Member
yeah, not bad at all for a first attempt. Only thing i would suggest is reduce your step-over for your finishing pass. I've found that around .008 step over with anything over .125 ball end mill produces a surface that's easy to sand out the remaining machining marks. Very useful if you want a polished end product.

ninja edit:
Are you using a z-level finishing technique and dropping it .005 per layer?
 
Last edited:

TomS

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
yeah, not bad at all for a first attempt. Only thing i would suggest is reduce your step-over for your finishing pass. I've found that around .008 step over with anything over .125 ball end mill produces a surface that's easy to sand out the remaining machining marks. Very useful if you want a polished end product.

ninja edit:
Are you using a z-level finishing technique and dropping it .005 per layer?
I'm still playing with the CAM side to better understand the interaction among all the 3D machining strategies and their individual settings. Too many choices! For this exercise I used adaptive clearing for the three machining passes. Adaptive clearing is probably not the best choice for finishing but it seemed to work the best for rounding over the edges. Still have a lot to learn.

There are minimum and maximum stepdown and stepover settings but I'm not sure how the program interprets the inputs when machining. If I select a fine stepdown and stepover my computer takes forever to generate the tool path even though the machine time is less than an hour. For this test my finish pass settings are:

Max roughing stepdown = .010
Fine stepdown = .006
Minimum stepdown = .005

Max shallow stepover = .010
Min shallow stepover = .005

Tom S.
 

cs900

maker of chips
Active Member
Yeah, finish passes are a lot of points so they take a while to generate. you gotta pay to play as the saying goes. Adaptive clearing isn't a great option for finishing, but it got the job done. :)

I'll open up fusion tonight and see what finishing options there are, if you'd like some input.
 

Metal

Active Member
Active Member
there's a checkbox for shallow areas or shallow something or other that will generate additional passes for curved areas, so you can leave a larger stepdown and it will add detail passes only where needed.
 

TomS

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
Yeah, finish passes are a lot of points so they take a while to generate. you gotta pay to play as the saying goes. Adaptive clearing isn't a great option for finishing, but it got the job done. :)

I'll open up fusion tonight and see what finishing options there are, if you'd like some input.
Input is encouraged. Fusion has been a steep learning curve so any outside help is appreciated.

Tom S.
 

TomS

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
there's a checkbox for shallow areas or shallow something or other that will generate additional passes for curved areas, so you can leave a larger stepdown and it will add detail passes only where needed.
Thanks. I have Machine Shallow Areas checked as well as Machine Cavities. As I said above I'm still learning the interaction amongst all of the selections.

Tom S.
 

cs900

maker of chips
Active Member
I'll have to double check fusion, but a lot of CAM (and CAD) programs if you hover your mouse over a button you're not sure what it does and hit "F1" it'll take you to the help explanation of what it does.

I'll try looking at fusion tonight, but I think there are better finishing toolpaths than the adaptive clearing. I think that's more for large material removal.
 

Boswell

Hobby Machinist since 2010
H-M Supporter-Premium
I have been working on a wind powered Music box. For me this is a huge project and I expect it to take a year but mostly due to putting it aside to work on other things. Anyway, I completed the gearbox, mounting for the gearbox and the main frame pieces so I thought I would share. I have started working on the mounting for the chime bars and after that the drum and hammers. 20161106_110047.jpg
I Bought the gears and bearings.

20161106_110104.jpg
Once I complete all the parts, I will sand them smooth and my vision right now is to anodize all of the aluminum.
The frame pieces were about 1/2 inch to long to mill in one setup. I milled the left half first and then if you look closely you can see a "square" hole in the middle that I used as a reference point to mill the right half.
I also still need to counterbore some of the bolt holes for Cap head screws.
 

Cadillac STS

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
This is why I love CNC. 10 minutes to CAD and CAM, 12 minutes to machine and another 10 minutes to debur and clean up where the tabs were.

View attachment 142582 View attachment 142585 View attachment 142583 View attachment 142584

Nice work!

Good idea on the tailstock having the scale face mounted like that to see the numbers better.

I have a similar setup but it is flat against the stock body and not easy to read the numbers because it is at an angle when looking down. Have to retrofit mine to the angle.
 

jbolt

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
Nice work!

Good idea on the tailstock having the scale face mounted like that to see the numbers better.

I have a similar setup but it is flat against the stock body and not easy to read the numbers because it is at an angle when looking down. Have to retrofit mine to the angle.
Thanks Cadillac. I didn't want it on top of the tail stock like I see many people do because I have a tendency to lean on it while taking long cutting passes. And as you say it can be difficult to read when mounted on the side. The only drawback is it can interfere with the tool post when using a center in the tail stock. In those cases I loosen the clamping screw and slide it back on the quill.
 

shooter123456

Active Member
Active Member
I made a new bottom plate for a treadmill motor and a little panel to attach electrical connectors to.

The plate for the treadmill motor is so that I can mount it on the mill and replace the little stock one. Its rated for a max of 2.25 HP and continuous duty at 1.3HP. Much more than the "4/5"HP standard motor that is actually only 350W.

Here is the plate next to the old one made from pressed sheet metal. I was surprised to find that the motor only weighs about 2lbs more than the stock motor and is almost the same size physically.


Here is the plate for the electrical connectors. The plan was originally to drill right into the wall of the enclosure into the electronics box behind it, but the connectors don't fit well, keep popping out, and are far from water proof. This one will attach to the wall and hold them firmly. I went with 10 holes to make room for 3 steppers, 3 encoders, and room to expand to a 4th axis, plug in the enclosure LEDs, and limit switches in the future. It was a little bit blurry and I didn't realize that until I uploaded it. Looked a lot better on my phone.


All of these were made on my X2 mill. In this picture, you can see the mill making the plate, as well as the connectors hanging out of the wall, hence the need for the plate.

 

shooter123456

Active Member
Active Member
Shooter, That's Cool !! That is on my to do list, figure out how to do some spindle turning for parts like that...
Thanks :)

There wasn't much to it. I set up a second CNC profile in linux cnc for a lathe with the head as the Z axis and the X as the cross slide. Then clamped the insert holder to 2 1-2-3 blocks stacked as a T and while in "mill mode", indicate on the tip of the insert so that it is positioned at 0,0 for the X and Y. Then switch over to the lathe profile and go to town.
 

TomS

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
Recently I replaced by cheap BoB with a PMDX-126 breakout board, a ethernet smoothstepper and a PMDX-107 spindle control board. Wanting to try out the new "toys" I decided to make a couple of air vents for the new electronics enclosure. The vents are probably not necessary but who knows what might start growing in an air-tight enclosure.

Here are the finished vents. For reference the bolt holes are 3-1/2" on center.
20170714_151813_resized.jpg

Here they are installed on the enclosure. I sandwiched some fiberglasss window screen material between the enclosure and vent to keep out swarf and insects.
20170714_152754_resized.jpg 20170714_152848_resized.jpg

BTW - I noticed an appreciable reduction in backlash with the new electronics and no more UC-100 connection faults.

Tom S.