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Organize And Store My Er-32 Collets......finally

brino

Active User
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#1
I got my first ER-32 collet set for my old lathe years ago. Since then I have bought many more collets from ebay and my local used tool store, both imperial and metric.

Up 'til now they were all thrown in a box making it a long process to find the right size for a job.
No More!

I started with a piece of left-over luan plywood that would fit into a tool-box drawer. I marked out and drilled a grid of 1-1/4"(I think) holes with a Forstner bit.
rack1.jpg

I added some MDF strips on the bottom for legs (and some strength); one each at top and bottom edges and one between rows near the middle.

I once made a comment here worrying about wood in contact with metal due to the wood absorbing humidity and keeping it against the metal. At that time someone suggested soaking the wood in oil (if I could figure out who said it in what thread, I would give credit!). So I soaked it face-down in a tray with clean motor oil overnight, then let it hang and drip off the following day.

I left space at one end of the drawer for the lathe adapter and pin wrenches. It turned out alright:
rack3.jpg

All that's left is to add some little labels below each of the collets marking the size.
Not only will they be easy to find, but I'll also see what sizes I am missing.

Organizing is never finished....what to do about those large drill bits......hmmmmm.

-brino
 
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Ken_Shea

Active User
Active Member
#3
Nice and neat is right!
Who ever suggested the oil... it was a good one, I've personally experienced rusting with items stored in direct contact with wood.

Ken
 

T Bredehoft

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H-M Supporter-Premium
#4
My shop is in the same room as my furnace, I don't have a problem with moisture. I used a similar idea for R8 collets and tool storage, but I put it in a drawer beneath the PM@5 mill (mounted on an old kitchen counter.) I used two pcs of 1/4 Luan, with holes in each, to keep the collets straight. I put a reinforcement rib between the two layers, too.
Collet Storage drawer.jpg

There is a 3 insert face mill out, and the black thing in the back holds a slitting saw.
 

T Bredehoft

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#6
Come on now, that is just way too neat for a home shop. :laughing: Every time I clean up my shop it takes months to find any thing.
It's neat because I remember to close it before I run the mill. The counter is covered in chips. And, the drawer in 9" deep, I'm afraid to put anything small in it knowing that something large will eventually cover it up.

Yeah, I have lots of trouble finding where did I put that mike down? I have three zero to one mikes, never can find one.
 

brino

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#7
Who ever suggested the oil... it was a good one, I've personally experienced rusting with items stored in direct contact with wood.
If I remove a collet from the drawer it now has a slight ring of oil on it instead of rust, but just on the outside tapered face not enough to foul the grip by getting onto the inside surface.


My shop is in the same room as my furnace, I don't have a problem with moisture.
That's a good arrangement. Always heated and some constant air flow is ideal.
My shop is in a 2-car garage (that I can no longer park in!). I do keep it above freezing in winter, and warmer when I'm in it. Humidity is uncontrollable.

Come on now, that is just way to neat for a home shop. :laughing: Every time I clean up my shop it takes months to find any thing.
Notice that I only showed that one drawer....it is now the most organized part of my shop.

I emptied that drawer by moving taps/dies and their associated tooling to THREE other drawers (imperial, metric and thread handles/charts/measuring tools), it was impossible to find anything in there. One of those other drawers originally held large taper-shank drill bits; 1/2 up to just over an inch. I still have no good place/solution for those drill bits....sigh.....
Anybody got some good ideas for large drill-bit storage?

This summer I moved a aluminum extension ladder off the back wall of the shop and now store it outside. I build a whack of storage shelves in that space....they are now almost full, but the shop is really NOT much more organized! What happened to all that new storage space?

I often feel like I do more clean-up and organization that actually building/making anything.
My wife always says I do more vacuuming out there than in the house.

-brino
 

ogberi

Active User
Active Member
#8
I'd suggest a bike cable and lock on the ladder. We still have problems with 'scrappers' toting off anything made of aluminum, brass, or copper here in Florida. Not so much where I live, but it's pretty bad down where I work.
 

uncle harry

Active User
Active Member
#9
I got my first ER-32 collet set for my old lathe years ago. Since then I have bought many more collets from ebay and my local used tool store, both imperial and metric.

Up 'til now they were all thrown in a box making it a long process to find the right size for a job.
No More!

I started with a piece of left-over luan plywood that would fit into a tool-box drawer. I marked out and drilled a grid of 1-1/4"(I think) holes with a Forstner bit.
View attachment 109870

I added some MDF strips on the bottom for legs (and some strength); one each at top and bottom edges and one between rows near the middle.

I once made a comment here worrying about wood in contact with metal due to the wood absorbing humidity and keeping it against the metal. At that time someone suggested soaking the wood in oil (if I could figure out who said it in what thread, I would give credit!). So I soaked it face-down in a tray with clean motor oil overnight, then let it hang and drip off the following day.

I left space at one end of the drawer for the lathe adapter and pin wrenches. It turned out alright:
View attachment 109871

All that's left is to add some little labels below each of the collets marking the size.
Not only will they be easy to find, but I'll also see what sizes I am missing.

Organizing is never finished....what to do about those large drill bits......hmmmmm.

-brino
I have a large supply of polypropoline drops ranging from 1/2" to 3/4" thick from a client who makes custom restaurant cutting boards. I make all sorts of tool-holding from this stuff. It machines well and resists oils and other shop fluids. The drawback with this material is labeling. Little or nothing sticks to it.
 

brino

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#10
Harry that is a great idea....never thought of that.
I do collect the old cutting boards from the kitchen when they get ragged or stained.
I have used the plastic ones for various low-speed bushings.

-brino
 
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Millalot

Active User
Active Member
#11
I got my first ER-32 collet set for my old lathe years ago. Since then I have bought many more collets from ebay and my local used tool store, both imperial and metric.

Up 'til now they were all thrown in a box making it a long process to find the right size for a job.
No More!

I started with a piece of left-over luan plywood that would fit into a tool-box drawer. I marked out and drilled a grid of 1-1/4"(I think) holes with a Forstner bit.
View attachment 109870

I added some MDF strips on the bottom for legs (and some strength); one each at top and bottom edges and one between rows near the middle.

I once made a comment here worrying about wood in contact with metal due to the wood absorbing humidity and keeping it against the metal. At that time someone suggested soaking the wood in oil (if I could figure out who said it in what thread, I would give credit!). So I soaked it face-down in a tray with clean motor oil overnight, then let it hang and drip off the following day.

I left space at one end of the drawer for the lathe adapter and pin wrenches. It turned out alright:
View attachment 109871

All that's left is to add some little labels below each of the collets marking the size.
Not only will they be easy to find, but I'll also see what sizes I am missing.

Organizing is never finished....what to do about those large drill bits......hmmmmm.


-brino
Soaking the wood with oil is a good idea, I have accumulated a lot o tooling in various cardboard boxes. So before storing tools in them I soak the boxes with heavy oil this helps preventing moisture and chemical reaction against the tools.
Your ER racks have reminded me that I have some spare office folder drawers in a steel cabinet these are 2" deep would be ideal for ER collets.
Millalot.
 

Kiwi Canuck

H-M Supporter - Premium Content
H-M Supporter-Premium
#13
Brino, nice job on the Collet organizer, how did you get the labels to stick? I thought with the oil soaked plywood it would make the labels near impossible to stay on.

I thought you may have to cut 3/8" strips of thin alum, screw them on and apply labels or (or use lamacoid and have it engraved for a real professional look)

Don't those empty spaces just yell at you to complete the set? I know it would for me.

David
 

brino

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#14
nice job on the Collet organizer, how did you get the labels to stick?
Hi David,

I printed the small labels on a full sheet, cut them apart then laminated them all at once, then cut them apart again, and finally used hot-glue to attach the labels. If you look close you can see some of the glue squished out around the labels. I got rid of most of the little "strings" it leaves behind. I kinda wondered if it would work too, but so far none have fallen off.


Don't those empty spaces just yell at you to complete the set? I know it would for me.
Every time I see them!...........but then I close the drawer ;)

Seriously, I gotta take a picture and keep it on my phone so when I'm out at the tool store I know which ones I need.

-brino