1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. PLEASE: Read the FORUM RULES BEFORE registering!

    Dismiss Notice

Not Another A Lathe Stop Post

Discussion in 'MACHINE ACCESSORIES (Tables, Vises, Indexers)' started by petertha, Dec 21, 2016.

  1. petertha

    petertha Canada H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    159
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Calgary
    State:
    Outside US / Canada

    -Return to Top-

    I've had some recent turning job where I've had to go back & forth between 2 X positions until proper depth is achieved (an internal grooved section inside a bore). I already had a similar stop which was mounted on left side of apron. I would stop on that & then unwind to the right up to a specific dial setting. Worked fine but I'm inherently lazy & wanted something that would stop on both sides & prevent possibility of brain fart over-cut-oops by over-rotating the dial or losing track of position (which happened).

    My #1 version clamped secure & worked well so I thought just clone it & make another. But turns out the bar length would not fit some of the lathe features on the right side of the apron, it had to be shortened & some bevels. I also thought it would be nicer to have one of those quick release clamps. Half turn unclamp, slide to position, half turn clamp, no reaching for hex keys to loosen & tighten cap screws. These handles are sprung so you can pull up a bit further & rotate to some other convenient d├ętente position so its out of the way. My first stop had two 8-32 cap screws. I used 2 screws mostly to keep the upper/lower parts aligned so the clamp doesn't want to rotate out of position as it slides along the V. So I thought this version would require a dowel pin > hole or something because the assembly is free to pivot on the 10-24 handle stud. Turns out I got the parts fitting nice, they stay aligned to the bed because the gap is quite small & don't really rotate out of position. So hear it is, hopefully self explanatory. Any questions fire away.
     

    Attached Files:

    f350ca, jmanatee, Bob Korves and 5 others like this.
  2. Randall Marx

    Randall Marx United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    140
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Oscoda
    State:
    Michigan

    -Return to Top-

    Very nice! I can see this being quite handy.
     
  3. Groundhog

    Groundhog United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    159
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Salina
    State:
    Kansas

    -Return to Top-

    Nice!

    I guess I'll add another one to the collection. This is much the same as yours with the exception that mine lacks the neat tightening handle but has a dial indicator. Both have knurled locking and adjustable stops.

    DSCF0973-r.JPG
     
  4. petertha

    petertha Canada H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    159
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Calgary
    State:
    Outside US / Canada

    -Return to Top-

    I like that you integrated a stop and a dial in the same block. I had a dial (only) version too. After I installed DRO on the lathe, the requirement got simpler to just 'stop'. But I want to come up with something better than my mini mag stand for a dial or DTI on the Y-axis for tool post grinding.

    Man, my camera or flash or shop fluorescent lighting is really exaggerating machining marks & the blackening looks yuck. I swear, its not that ugly in real life! :) I need the Un-Apprentice mode on my photo editing software!
     
  5. Groundhog

    Groundhog United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    159
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Salina
    State:
    Kansas

    -Return to Top-

    The shinier the surface the harder it is to photograph. I just about have given up taking pictures of the chrome-like surfaces of my medallions. They Howling Dog 2b.jpg look like sh*t under the lens, but are near perfect in real life.
     
  6. petertha

    petertha Canada H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    159
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Calgary
    State:
    Outside US / Canada

    -Return to Top-

    I haven't had to make many parts with V notches but I've learned not to underestimate them. Especially if they have to be carefully dimensioned or a matched set. This time I learned a bit from prior experience. If you have any tips, pass them on.

    - I left my stock edges as close to 90-deg sharp as possible, meaning no burrs but no exaggerated file edge chamfering. This way when the stock was set at angle in vise, I could indicate a dimension off a corner reasonably accurately. The other method I considered was mill the V's leaving excess stock on end, then align V's & trim bar to common dimension later. But I figured I still have to mill a predetermined amount of X & Y material to make the notch equal sided, so why not go for glory & try & accomplish that in 1-shot by dimensioning off an edge. Hope this makes sense.

    - I removed most of the notch volume with saw & left maybe 0.050" or so for milling

    - still not sure this was correct procedure or not but seemed to work best. I established one facet with the bottom of the end mill. Its not as nice a finish. When that was established I plunged down the other side leaving 0.005" or so for finishing using side of EM. That minimized the EM cutting any substantial material from both bottom & side of corner simultaneously. I learned (painfully) they don't like that too much.

    - I probably don't have the right EM's to properly finish. It was a regular 2 flute HSS, reasonably sharp. I blued it & finished with a file. Here is start of that operation & it highlights the steps & spirals. Again, it actually looks better in real life, Mostly I just wanted it to be smooth & reasonably accurate, it clamps to the lathe V.
     

    Attached Files:

Share This Page