• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.
[4]

newbie setting up new mill

[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

scattermaster

Steel
Registered Member
Joined
Jun 19, 2017
Messages
27
Likes
18
#1
Hi there,
I just bought a Hitorque 5500 bench mill and all the trimmings from LMS.
This is my 1st machine and other than reading forum posts, I wasn't sure what I was getting myself into...
:)
Anyway, I wiped it down, installed the power feed kit, slapped the vice on it, and put a piece in and started cutting. Just wanted to cut something. Anything.
Man am I glad I got the power feed. The spring on the hand wheel is annoyingly strong and cranking that thing would get old fast... The power feed has one drawback. If I try to run it very slow, it doesn't rotate smooth. The work piece is fed in little "spurts", like it either doesn't have enough torque or there's a hard spot somewhere in the rotation.
When I speed it up, it works just fine.
Then, I noticed there seemed to be "steps" at every row that my end mill went down. After I finished I removed everything and cleaned up and got out my tramming rig.
I set it up so that it would sweep the table all the way across from front to back. (about a 5 or 6" circle?)
It seems to be out in 2 directions. Like the table is low in the back and low on the left. (about .003")
I ran the table all the way left and right it the indicator doesn't seem to move at all. :)

So, my question is, if I decide to start shimming the column, can I loosen it without removing the tapered dowel pins? Like if I loosen the bolts, can I tap on the side at the top to create a space on the bottom for a shim?
thx,
Jim
 

DAT510

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2016
Messages
221
Likes
127
#2
Welcome to HM.

Regarding the stiffness in your table, have you lubricated your ways with oil? If so, your gibs may need adjusting. The table should move back and forth smoothly without sticking.
 

tertiaryjim

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2014
Messages
526
Likes
220
#3
As DAT510 said everything should move easy and smooth as silk.
Often the exposed ways are protected by cosmoline and if the table is moved before getting it off, it gets drug into the ways.
It is thick and any dirt on it will act like lapping compound so if thats the case you have to take the machine apart to clean it all out.
Hope it just needs lube and adjustment but opening up the machine will be a good way to learn about it.
 

TakeDeadAim

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2015
Messages
179
Likes
130
#4
Regarding tramming the head; I would check the gib on the column and make sure it is properly adjusted. If it continues to be out .003" in 5-6" I would contact LMS for a suggestion. I also agree with Tertiaryjim and make sure all the surfaces have been cleaned and lubricated with way oil. Most machines have some sort of lubrication port to lube the ways; if not then make sure they are clean and apply a way lubricant recommended by the maker or something like Mobil Vactra II. You can also extend your tramming distance by moving the Y axis so your indicator touches the front of the table at the front of the Y travel and the back of the table at the back of the travel. This should give you a wider swing and hence a larger sample of the machine's set up.
 

scattermaster

Steel
Registered Member
Joined
Jun 19, 2017
Messages
27
Likes
18
#5
thx guys,
The machine came with a lot of oil all over but I don't think it was cosmoline. Isn't it real thick and kind of "waxy" feeling?
I haven't had time to really investigate. I'll take a closer look and maybe even take things apart for a deeper cleaning as you suggested.
I was kind of surprised that it was that far out of tram. Is that normal for new Hobby mills?

"extend your tramming distance"...
This didn't even occur to me as a possibility. I would have thought that you wouldn't want to move anything while checking. Hmmm,
I'll try it.
 

higgite

General Manger - Proofreading Dept.
Active Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2013
Messages
657
Likes
660
#6
Hi Jim,

Congrats on your LMS 5500. I have one, too. I think you will like it.

Regarding tramming, as one rookie to another, how rigid is your tramming set up? When my machine was new, I sort of jerry rigged a tramming tool from a DTI holder with adjustable arms, which one would assume is rigid enough for govt. work. I got readings for X-axis of .0023” over 7” and Y-axis .0015” over 5”. Well, I discovered that when swinging the arm back and forth it would flex ever so slightly. My results weren’t repeatable. Then I made a rigid tramming tool from a 3/4” (IIRC) aluminum bar and retested. Readings were repeatable. The X-axis was out .0019” over 18”, the Y-axis .00025” over 5”. Plenty good enough for my purposes.

Not saying that you are experiencing the same thing I did, but thought it might be worth mentioning. We rookies sometimes overlook what is obvious to the veterans. If all else fails, give Chris or Brandon a call at LMS. I have found them to be most helpful and very patient with a rookie. Hope this helps.

Tom

P.S. Are you locking the Z-axis when making cuts and/or measuring X and Y tram?
 

scattermaster

Steel
Registered Member
Joined
Jun 19, 2017
Messages
27
Likes
18
#7
Hi Jim,

Congrats on your LMS 5500. I have one, too. I think you will like it.

Regarding tramming, as one rookie to another, how rigid is your tramming set up? When my machine was new, I sort of jerry rigged a tramming tool from a DTI holder with adjustable arms, which one would assume is rigid enough for govt. work. I got readings for X-axis of .0023” over 7” and Y-axis .0015” over 5”. Well, I discovered that when swinging the arm back and forth it would flex ever so slightly. My results weren’t repeatable. Then I made a rigid tramming tool from a 3/4” (IIRC) aluminum bar and retested. Readings were repeatable. The X-axis was out .0019” over 18”, the Y-axis .00025” over 5”. Plenty good enough for my purposes.

Not saying that you are experiencing the same thing I did, but thought it might be worth mentioning. We rookies sometimes overlook what is obvious to the veterans. If all else fails, give Chris or Brandon a call at LMS. I have found them to be most helpful and very patient with a rookie. Hope this helps.

Tom

P.S. Are you locking the Z-axis when making cuts and/or measuring X and Y tram?
Hey Tom,
My tramming kit is the LMS 5586 bench mill tramming kit. I would say it's not very rigid and yes, it's real finicky.
Repeat-ability wasn't the best but overall I kept seeing the same general thing. It's like the column is leaning to the right and forward a little bit.
I don't remember if I locked the Z axis or not.
Before I go monkeying around with anything I'm going to play with it some more and see how it really affects my work pieces. I'd hate to mess it up before I even get used to it. :)
 

Bob Korves

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Messages
4,195
Likes
4,390
#8
I ran the table all the way left and right it the indicator doesn't seem to move at all. :)
Moving the table left and right does not tell you anything about tram, or about the flatness of the table. Think about it...
 

Jonathans

Professional Fish Killer
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Sep 24, 2014
Messages
180
Likes
59
#9
How tight are you gibs? Tram the head. Not the table.
 

scattermaster

Steel
Registered Member
Joined
Jun 19, 2017
Messages
27
Likes
18
#10
How tight are you gibs? Tram the head. Not the table.
I didn't check the gibs. (oops)
I did go back and play with it a bit. I learned that when I lock and unlock the head, it changes the reading on the indicator.
I finally did add some shims under the right side of my column and everything got a lot better. Now I'm only out about .001".
I'm gonna leave it that way for a while and have some fun with the machine. If/when I get to a point where I need a better set up, I'll revisit tramming.
thx guys,
 

jouesdeveaux

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
May 6, 2016
Messages
18
Likes
5
#11
Baby those gibs! I have a 7 x 12 Grizzly and can say from the experience of breaking it in: spend lots of time on gibs. Lap until you get a nice finish and adjust periodically. It made a very big difference in my machine not just in smooth running and good work piece finish, but accuracy as well.
 
[6]
[5] [7]