• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.
  • Guest,  We want to wish You and Your Family a Healthy, Happy Thanksgiving! Click the "X" at the top right corner to remove this notice)
  • PLEASE: Read the FORUM RULES BEFORE registering!

4

New To Me Grizzly G0709 14 X 40 Lathe

3
Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!
10

BGHansen

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2014
Messages
727
Likes
1,618
#1
I got the OK from the boss to upgrade lathes. I settled on a Grizzly G0709 14 x 40 after considering a number of options. Won't bore everyone with all of the details, but I liked Grizzly's service rep, D1-5 spindle, brake, coolant and especially the universal quick change gear box. I ordered it on September 29, got the call from UPS Freight on October 2 to schedule a delivery.

Fortunately for me my brother-in-law has a truck dock and fork truck. Grizzly told me that because of the weight of the machine (1550 lbs.), power tailgate was not an options. I'm sure I've read other threads where mills have been delivered via Tommy-lift, but it wasn't an option for me.

Getting the crate off is a bit of a chore, lots of tabs to bend to lift off the top. Then lots of nails to pull to break down the crate. Unloading from my trailer was pretty painless because of my HF gantry crane. Wonderful piece of equipment by the way. If you have space for one, buy it! I used 830 lbs. rated ratchet straps on each corner which work well for balancing the load. It's hard to see in the photos, but I ran a loop of 1/4" cable also after the load was balanced for belt and suspenders.

Others have had shipping problems with their similar lathes, I did also. My tail stock under-bed clamp worked its way loose and fell in the chip pan. Fortunately the tail stock stayed on the top side of the bed though it did contact the carriage and chipped a little paint. The top knurled nut holding the back side head stock cover loosened up also. No damage here, nut was trapped under the flip-up sheet metal cover. The M5 set screw that retains the flip up cover to access the spindle spider was missing also. The High/Low range shift lever worked its way loose and was also in the bottom of the crate.

I broke the lathe in per Grizzly's instructions and changed the headstock and gear box fluid. I bought ISO 32 and ISO 68 oil from Tractor Supply for around $25 for 2 gallons. The drained fluid looked new; no chips, dirt or anything.

My other two lathes are a Delta/Rockwell 10 x 36 and a Clausing 5418 12 x 24. I owned an Atlas 12" some years ago which emcompasses my experience on turning tools. I'll add to this thread as I gain more experience on the Grizzly. Here are my first impressions (some are personal preferences based on my other lathe's set ups):

I really like the gear head speed shifting as compared to my Clausing's belt drive. Mine shifts very smoothly, need just a little turn of the chuck to get the gears to drop in. High / Low range is no problem. I have some issues shifting between the 4 speeds, probably operator error/experience more than anything. More than once I thought the lathe was in gear, hit the Jog button and spun the motor but not the spindle. I'm am getting better with experience.

The power switches on the headstock are inadequately mounted in my opinion. The 0.040" (give or take) thick aluminum screen printed panel cover is about 15" x 10" and is secured in the corners and on the sides. The switches mount to the thin aluminum and flex in/out too much for my liking. I pulled the panel and reinforced the switch area with a pieces of aluminum 1/8" thick x ~10" x 2". Much stiffer now.

I also don't like the micrometer dials on the cross feed and compound. They are large enough to easily read, but I'm used to loosening a lock screw, freely turning the wheel to position and locking it back down. This lathe uses a friction clutch of sorts to position the dials. According to the parts drawings there are two springs and balls under the dials to add some friction. You need to hold the handles rock steady as you turn the dials to zero. I'm concerned that the crank will move a bit as the dial is rotated regardless of how carefully I hold the crank. I'm likely adding a taper attachment to this lathe which gives me a new cross feed arrangement, will likely drill and tap a hole in dial to add a locking screw and lose the springs/balls. Maybe I'll get used to it over time.

I did some single point threading for an M8 x 1.25 bolt to replace the carriage locking bolt. It's a cap screw as designed. I made a 303 stainless screw/clamp arm for locking the carriage. No issue with the threads. Love being able to switch between most metric and english threads without fiddling with head stock end gears.

I had to adjust the tail stock to center up with the spindle. Others noted having problems with this but it didn't take me long at all. Same adjustment as my Clausing and Rockwell lathes; loosen one screw, tighten the other to offset the center. Mine is better than 0.0005" over 12" (for now).

I haven't checked the accuracy of the compound protractor yet, heard from others it's off. I did my M8 x 1.25 with the compound set to 60 deg. Thread came out fine. The protractor only covers 120 degrees of rotation, both my Clausing and Rockwell are graduated through a couple of clocking marks to a full 360.

One thing I don't like about the compound is you can't swing it a full 360. The crank on the compound will hit the light and coolant nozzle when swung 120 deg. from straight on. Chamfering will be done with the compound swung towards the chuck instead around to the back side of the bed.

QCTP lock lever is off by 90 degrees from I'm used to. I've seen a couple of youtube videos of other guys with the same thing so it's probably on most/all of them. The piston style post has the two typical dovetails that I'll call turning/facing and boring. The lock lever for facing is locked either at about 7 o'clock or 1 o'clock. 1 o'clock is over your work if you're turning something long. I'm used to the lever ending up at around 5 o'clock when locked. So why not use the lever at the 7 o'clock locking position? To unlock it you turn it to 8 o'clock which puts the lever just over the tool holder. Can't lift the tool holder off because it's under the lock lever. I fixed it by pulling the two plates that move in/out on the tool post and ground about 0.025" off the front/back. My lock lever now locks in place at 5 o'clock for both turning/facing and boring.

Really like having a back splash for keeping swarf off the floor. I'm going to lose the sheet metal spreader between the head stock and tail stock cabinets and replace it with a shelf/drawer unit. Not that I want to do a lot of deep knee bends to grab stuff from under the bed, it's just my personal preference. Seems like a good place to put the tool box, steady/follow rests and faceplate. I'm going to repurpose the spreader by turning it into a back splash on my Clausing lathe.

Longitudinal cranking is about 1/2 the travel per turn as my Clausing; 9/16" on the Grizzly, just over an inch on the Clausing. On the plus side the Grizzly longitudinal crank is graduated; easy to tell how much you're taking off when facing.

Overall I'm very happy at this point. I parted a 1 1/2" round of 303 stainless with a HSS cut off blade with no incidents. Not a hint of chatter.

I'll post updates as I get more experienced on the lathe.

Bruce

20151005_185559 a.jpg 20151005_192442 a.jpg 20151005_203327 a.jpg 20151005_203622 a.jpg 20151011_110641 a.jpg
 

wrmiller

Chief Tinkerer
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2013
Messages
3,080
Likes
1,077
#2
Very nice. I do like the secondary transmission (gearbox) on that lathe. While I have full imperial feeds/threads in my Norton style, I have to change a gear to get metric threading.
 

tmarks11

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2013
Messages
858
Likes
173
#5
Buy some handles from McMaster and replace the socket-head cap screws so you can (easily) lock the carriage,cross-slide, and compound (as needed). These handles are awesome.

http://www.mcmaster.com/#control-handles/=zdvl1k

6271k22p1s.png

Remove one of the two drive belts, it will help reduce vibration (one v-belt can easily transmit 2 hp without slipping, two is over-kill).

You notice that one revolution of the carriage handle gives you something strange (like 0.563" of longitudinal travel; on travel and don't remember the number). Not even a number that works out to an even metric quantity. Strange.

My solution to the QCTP problem was replacing it with an Aloris. A lot more solid.
 

Attachments

Last edited:

BGHansen

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2014
Messages
727
Likes
1,618
#7
Buy some handles from McMaster and replace the socket-head cap screws so you can (easily) lock the carriage,cross-slide, and compound (as needed). These handles are awesome.

http://www.mcmaster.com/#control-handles/=zdvl1k

6271k22p1s.png

Remove one of the two drive belts, it will help reduce vibration (one v-belt can easily transmit 2 hp without slipping, two is over-kill).

You notice that one revolution of the carriage handle gives you something strange (like 0.563" of longitudinal travel; on travel and don't remember the number). Not even a number that works out to an even metric quantity. Strange.

My solution to the QCTP problem was replacing it with an Aloris. A lot more solid.
Thanks for the tip on the McMaster handles! Those will be going on my machines in a number of spots!
Bruce
 

Attachments

mksj

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2014
Messages
1,453
Likes
1,638
#8
Second what Tmarks said about replacing the cap screw locks, although I machined some for my lathe because of clearance issues. One other source to look for fixtures and handles is Fixtureworks: http://www.fixtureworks.net/ProductIndex/tabid/104/Default.aspx
You can get lost with all the types, but Fixtureworks has a wider selection then McMaster if you are looking for something specific to your application.
 

tmarks11

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2013
Messages
858
Likes
173
#10
Here is what I bought:

Carriage Lock:
6848K52 Metric Die Cast Zinc Adjustable Handle, M8 X 1.25 Thread X 60MM Stud

Cross slide and compound:
(Don't remember which length was required, I think the 30mm one for the cross slide and the 15mm for the compound, but they may have both required longer lengths, regardless I had to grind a bit off the end, shape the end, and touch up the threads):
6848K38 Metric Die Cast Zinc Adjustable Handle, M6 X 1 Thread X 30MM Stud
6848K35 Metric Die Cast Zinc Adjustable Handle, M6 X 1 Thread X 15MM Stud

Just a note: you need to hold onto the carriage lock assembly from beneath when you remove the cap screw from the top and hold it in position while you thread in the handle so you don't lose the pieces.

Handles look like this:
IMG_1296_zpsu3msk9h2.jpg

IMG_1295_zpsmoo1gzmg.jpg
 

Attachments

Holescreek

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2013
Messages
643
Likes
511
#12
I guess I didn't search hard enough before I posted shipping questions. It looks like the hard part will be locating a dock with a forklift to take delivery.
 

tmarks11

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2013
Messages
858
Likes
173
#13
You don't need to locate one. Ask Grizzly who is the shipping company for your lathe, then call them and ask to pick it up at their terminal. They will be glad to let you, as it saves them the trip, and will put it on your trailer with a forklift. I have picked up at least half a dozen shipments that way, stretching from RI to VA to WA. It also has the advantage of letting you pick it up when it is convenient for you.

If you don't have a trailer (or even if you do), I recommend you rent a drop-deck trailer. It has a hydraulically operated drop dreck, and you will be able to wheel the lathe off the trailer with a pallet jack (something you can rent at the same time as the trailer). Sunbelt rental rents them for $75-95 per day. Worth the money in eliminating the white knuckled lift off the trailer.
 

maker of things

Hermit
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2014
Messages
339
Likes
179
#17
That machine is very similar to my PM1440, I think you will like it. I found the height of the spindle and controls to be very comfortable, unlike an old SB that you have to hunch over like an old woman to run (no offence to old women). I really like having the brake on the machine too. It's that little extra comfort when you are doing a job with pucker factor.
You guys and your large lathes...(Coolidge looks at his 12x36 and sighs)
It's kinda like having a boat, there is always a reason you "need" a bigger one.
 

BGHansen

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2014
Messages
727
Likes
1,618
#18
The G0709 is a really nice machine. I got tired of doing deep knee bends to change speeds on my 12 x 24 Clausing and after a lot of deliberation settled on the G0709. The Clausing still feels smoother to me, maybe years of turning chrome plated hourglass crank handles instead of satin finished loose tubes on shoulder bolts (Grizzly). I just ordered a 5-C lever style collet closer for it too. Really like the 5-C chuck on my Clausing but went with the lever style on the Grizzly. Haven't made anything yet that needed the 14 x 40 over my 12 x 24 Clausing. Did single point thread an M8 x 1.25 303 stainless screw for a new carriage lock (don't have metric change gears for the Clausing). This lathe is a dream machine for going between English and metric threads, one knob on the gear box changes between E/M. No changing gears on the quadrant (depending on coarseness of thread). I also put the taper attachment on the lathe which my son uses to turn (of all things) chop sticks. Granted, they are out of zebrawood, cocobolo, purple heart and other exotics, but chop sticks?!?!?

Ironically, my 19-year old son Steven (him in the photo on the Clausing) and I just finished up the majority of work for the gun project pictured. Nothing was turned on my "Gunsmith" lathe, just the Clausing. We're to the fine tuning stage at present. Next will be a tripod mount and an oak box to house everything. Caliber is .22 short/ .22 long or .22 lr (pictured). Oh do I long for the $10 for a 500 round brick days . . . should crack off about $50 worth of ammo per minute at today's prices.

Bruce

CIMG1571a.jpg CIMG3484.JPG CIMG3485.JPG CIMG3486.JPG CIMG3487.JPG CIMG3488.JPG
 

Holescreek

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2013
Messages
643
Likes
511
#19
I've been questioning my choices on which lathe to buy. Usually I him-haw around because I hate spending money but this time I have the cash in hand. 95% of what I do day to day is gun work, either building or making tooling for them. I've done it all on a '50's 12.5"x18" Cincinatti Traytop with special fixturing for many years. Everything would be faster/easier with the short headstock and 1.5"+ spindle bore and longer center distance of the grizzly. It would be nice to have a lathe that cut metric threads too. Even with the new lathe I'd still use the Traytop for most everything that will fit.
 

Jbar

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Sep 24, 2014
Messages
20
Likes
3
#21
I have a G0709 and really like it too. Does anyone know of anyone converting one to CNC?
 

Sdmf5150

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2017
Messages
30
Likes
9
#22
Here is what I bought:

Carriage Lock:
6848K52 Metric Die Cast Zinc Adjustable Handle, M8 X 1.25 Thread X 60MM Stud

Cross slide and compound:
(Don't remember which length was required, I think the 30mm one for the cross slide and the 15mm for the compound, but they may have both required longer lengths, regardless I had to grind a bit off the end, shape the end, and touch up the threads):
6848K38 Metric Die Cast Zinc Adjustable Handle, M6 X 1 Thread X 30MM Stud
6848K35 Metric Die Cast Zinc Adjustable Handle, M6 X 1 Thread X 15MM Stud

Just a note: you need to hold onto the carriage lock assembly from beneath when you remove the cap screw from the top and hold it in position while you thread in the handle so you don't lose the pieces.

Handles look like this:
View attachment 191207

View attachment 191208
That's a nice setup! I will definitely be doing the same!
 

ghostdncr

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2017
Messages
123
Likes
84
#23
Very nice project you and Steven have going there, Bruce. Now, get that crank handle out of the way and mount a Chevy starter motor to the side with a bevel-gear setup. We'll be wanting video, of course... :encourage:
 

Silverbullet

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
May 4, 2015
Messages
2,360
Likes
1,068
#24
The G0709 is a really nice machine. I got tired of doing deep knee bends to change speeds on my 12 x 24 Clausing and after a lot of deliberation settled on the G0709. The Clausing still feels smoother to me, maybe years of turning chrome plated hourglass crank handles instead of satin finished loose tubes on shoulder bolts (Grizzly). I just ordered a 5-C lever style collet closer for it too. Really like the 5-C chuck on my Clausing but went with the lever style on the Grizzly. Haven't made anything yet that needed the 14 x 40 over my 12 x 24 Clausing. Did single point thread an M8 x 1.25 303 stainless screw for a new carriage lock (don't have metric change gears for the Clausing). This lathe is a dream machine for going between English and metric threads, one knob on the gear box changes between E/M. No changing gears on the quadrant (depending on coarseness of thread). I also put the taper attachment on the lathe which my son uses to turn (of all things) chop sticks. Granted, they are out of zebrawood, cocobolo, purple heart and other exotics, but chop sticks?!?!?


Ironically, my 19-year old son Steven (him in the photo on the Clausing) and I just finished up the majority of work for the gun project pictured. Nothing was turned on my "Gunsmith" lathe, just the Clausing. We're to the fine tuning stage at present. Next will be a tripod mount and an oak box to house everything. Caliber is .22 short/ .22 long or .22 lr (pictured). Oh do I long for the $10 for a 500 round brick days . . . should crack off about $50 worth of ammo per minute at today's prices.

Bruce

View attachment 114981 View attachment 114982 View attachment 114983 View attachment 114984 View attachment 114985 View attachment 114986
 

Silverbullet

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
May 4, 2015
Messages
2,360
Likes
1,068
#25
Tell your son , some exotics can be deadly , even the sanding dust from them. You don't want to get sick .
I love the gat, hope to build one someday in 22 mag of course. Or even 45 colt yupp
 
[6]
5 [7]