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New Pm-935 Coming Soon!

Ken226

Steel
Registered Member
#1
After researching milling machines for awhile, and due in no small part to the reviews posted here I put a deposit down on a new PM-935 mill from Matt's next shipment.

Matt was very helpful and courteous, and did his best to convince me that the PM-935 was the way to go, as opposed to the Jet of similar size I had in mind.

Any advice from owners of this machine is welcome. How's the rigidity compared to the machine I sold to finance this one (a KBC 7x31, same as the grizzly G0730)?

Is it safe to lift using the lifting eye or should I use a cargo straps under the ram?
 

Stonebriar

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#2
the lifting eye is safe to lift with, but it will be front heavy wanting to lean forward. Congratulations on the purchase of a great machine. I love mine.

Rick
 

MonkMan

H-M Supporter - Premium Content
H-M Supporter-Premium
#3
PC205425.JPG Great call. It comes well pack in a large crate. Have some friends around to help.
 

Alan H

H-M Supporter - Premium Content
H-M Supporter-Premium
#4
Keep the head tucked down and lift from the front with a couple of tag lines to control the tilt. IMG_20161218_151115.jpg
 

Ken226

Steel
Registered Member
#5
Thanks for the advice, will do!

Only 6-11 weeks to wait. I'll have to rent a flatbed trailer to back it into the shop. My enclosed trailer won't clear the 7' rollup door and the hoist casters will sink into the gravel drive if I try to lift it outside.
 

Ken226

Steel
Registered Member
#8
I ordered the single phase step pulley version. I'd considered getting a 3phase version and adding a VFD but changing speeds via the step pulleys seems easy enough that I'll hold out for awhile.

I decided that if/when I decide to go variable speed, I wanna go with a DC shunt motor and use a closed loop speed controller. For now, I'll stick with the step pulleys

This will make a perfect edition to my shop. The color is a close match to my Birmingham 1340 lathe and G0704 CNC mill.

You guys are making the wait even harder with those pics. Those things sure are pretty. Monkman, that's the same engine hoist I have. Good to know it'll lift the mill.

Do you find the height of the mill to be about right. Some seem to be fabbing bases to get it a little taller?
 

tmarks11

Active User
Active Member
#9
Really nice job on the control box.

Can you show some close ups of how you mounted it?

Where and how did you mount the sensor for the tachometer?
 

Rich V

Active Member
Active Member
#10
the lifting eye is safe to lift with, but it will be front heavy wanting to lean forward. Congratulations on the purchase of a great machine. I love mine.

Rick
When I lifted my PM935 I moved the table as close to the back as possible and pulled the ram out to the max forward position. When I lifted by the eye hook it was almost perfectly balanced.
 

xplodee

Active Member
Active Member
#11
Really nice job on the control box.

Can you show some close ups of how you mounted it?

Where and how did you mount the sensor for the tachometer?
Thank you!

It's mounted using a piece of aluminum angle bracket from lowes and some steel cylinders I machined on my lathe. Bolted into the original M6 tapped holes where the stock forward/reverse drum switch mounts.

I've thought a lot about where to mount the tach and have decided to mount it below the quill so that it will pull direct from the bottom of the spindle. This way I don't have to worry about hitting it while tightening the draw bar. It's important that the tach be grabbing the actual RPM and not pulling off of a pulley.

I am going to re-wire the internals to make use of some DIN mounted parts and to add internal power supplies. The VFD I bought did not come with a 12v rail like I thought it would so I have to add that to my system, also PM's DRO system uses a huge 5v power supply which I will remove and replace with a DIN mounted unit. All of this equipment is mounted within the milling machine's column.

For those buying new machines or considering how to outfit theirs: I would NEVER buy a manually operated mill without a VFD and tachometer. The benefits are endless. It is as necessary as a DRO in my opinion. It is also considerably cheaper than adding a DRO. Figure $500 all in including all the buttons, enclosures and wiring.

32048851972_75762f3015_z.jpg Untitled by Tim Marks, on Flickr


31355751234_f019afa82a_z.jpg Untitled by Tim Marks, on Flickr
 

tmarks11

Active User
Active Member
#12
I've thought a lot about where to mount the tach and have decided to mount it below the quill so that it will pull direct from the bottom of the spindle. This way I don't have to worry about hitting it while tightening the draw bar. It's important that the tach be grabbing the actual RPM and not pulling off of a pulley.
I have been trying to figure out the best place to mount the tach sensor as well. Please post what you end up with so I can copy it. :D

btw, my name is Tim Marks as well, and I also have a PM935. some coincidence.
 

xplodee

Active Member
Active Member
#13
I
btw, my name is Tim Marks as well, and I also have a PM935. some coincidence.
Now that is WEIRD! haha. I'll post what I end up with. Did you go with a Tachulator kit for the tachometer? It's $60 but I like the fact that it automatically calculates the SFM once you input the end mill diameter. Very useful!
 

Kiwi Canuck

H-M Supporter - Premium Content
H-M Supporter-Premium
#15
Xplodee, can you post the info on your build of the control box as I like the look of that set-up.

If possible links to the supplier of that box and tach, also who did the graphics?

Thank you.

David
 

xplodee

Active Member
Active Member
#16
Hi David-

I'm using a "3-wire" control technique off of the Teco VFD. This means two momentary switches for start and stop plus another continuous switch for FWD/RVS.

All the buttons and the potentiometer are purchased from factorymation.com, 30mm series. Not the cheapest out there but they work really well. I will be adding an LED light on top of the box to let me know when power is on. The box came from McMaster for $25 and I milled it out using my Haas VF1. A knife switch turns the 220v single-phase on for the VFD and also powers a relay which closes the 110v circuit.

The plate on top of the box is 1/8" clear acrylic with one side painted white, then CNC machined for the holes and engraving. I then paint the engraving in black. All of the paint is on the backside of the plate so it will never get damaged and will always look great.

The tachometer is from here: http://mkctools.com/tachulator.htm I installed it into my control box behind the plate. This is the second time I've done a setup like this. The first was for my 1942 South Bend Heavy 10 lathe. There is a 12-conductor wire that goes from the VFD inside the mill's column to the control box. This is used for 12v to power the LED and Tachulator inside the control box. The rest of the conductors are part of the on/off, fwd/rvs and speed control. It can be confusing reading the instructions for a VFD but trust me, all of the info you need is in there, you just have to take notes and find it. They are VERY powerful devices considering their cost.
 

Ken226

Steel
Registered Member
#17
I got the email last week informing me that the machines have arrived in PA, and that mine will be shipping any day now.

I'm really looking forward to it. Time to start designing a base to set it on. I'm 6'1, so it may be a little short as is.
 

wrmiller

Chief Tinkerer
H-M Supporter-Premium
#18
I'm a bit over 6'2" and we lifted my mill almost 6". Here's a few early pics of mine to tide you over... ;)

IMG_0654.jpg
IMG_0674.jpg
IMG_0681.jpg
IMG_0757.jpg

Of course we will require copious amounts of pics when you get yours... :D
 

Ken226

Steel
Registered Member
#19
That thing is so pretty

I love that shiny blue n chrome logo plate on the belt cover! Wise styling decisions by PM. I bet he's won over at least a few customers on aesthetics alone.
 

rewilfert

Learning...
Registered Member
#20
Thank you!

It's mounted using a piece of aluminum angle bracket from lowes and some steel cylinders I machined on my lathe. Bolted into the original M6 tapped holes where the stock forward/reverse drum switch mounts.

I've thought a lot about where to mount the tach and have decided to mount it below the quill so that it will pull direct from the bottom of the spindle. This way I don't have to worry about hitting it while tightening the draw bar. It's important that the tach be grabbing the actual RPM and not pulling off of a pulley.

I am going to re-wire the internals to make use of some DIN mounted parts and to add internal power supplies. The VFD I bought did not come with a 12v rail like I thought it would so I have to add that to my system, also PM's DRO system uses a huge 5v power supply which I will remove and replace with a DIN mounted unit. All of this equipment is mounted within the milling machine's column.

For those buying new machines or considering how to outfit theirs: I would NEVER buy a manually operated mill without a VFD and tachometer. The benefits are endless. It is as necessary as a DRO in my opinion. It is also considerably cheaper than adding a DRO. Figure $500 all in including all the buttons, enclosures and wiring.

View attachment 187809 Untitled by Tim Marks, on Flickr


View attachment 187813 Untitled by Tim Marks, on Flickr

What model Teco VFD are you using for this setup?
 

xplodee

Active Member
Active Member
#21
I've used the JNEV and the newer L510 model. Personally I thought the JNEV had more useful features but depending on what you're doing both will work well. This mill was setup using the L510.
 

Ken226

Steel
Registered Member
#25
It's here!

The driver backed up to my shop overhead door, put the crate on the lift gate, lowered it to about an inch off the ground, then backed the left gate and crate right into the shop.

He wheeled it off the lift gate with the pallet jack, and set the crate right next to its new permanent 'spot'.

I spend a few hours making s base for it, lifting it 7". I know the wood base looks a little sketchy on the outside, but on the inside it's not. The 4 corners have thick hardwood pads on the inside that the machine sits on, transferring the load directly into the concrete and spreading it over 100 square inches of concrete.



Here it is level and on the floor.





Now I'm shopping for a vise. I'm kinda leaning toward a Glacern, but not sure if I want a 5 inch or a 6 inch.

Anyone have pics of either size? How much does a 6" hang over the back of the table?
 

Ken226

Steel
Registered Member
#27
Curious about that myself. I'll put a level on it periodically and monitor the compression in the wood.

Or if you mean aestically, holding up to oil, etc, I polyurethaned the hell out of it.
 

BFHammer

H-M Supporter - Premium Content
H-M Supporter-Premium
#29
Ken,
Machine and base look great! I went with a 5" Glacern for my PM-932 based on recommendations and pictures here.
Check for DarkZero's thread on his mill - if I recall he has some good pictures of the 5". Unfortunately I have my vice but still awaiting the arrival of my mill which should be here toward the end of the month.
Mark
 

Rich V

Active Member
Active Member
#30
I opted for the 6in Glacern on my PM935 and don't regret it. I lose maybe 1 inch on overhang on the column side but having a bigger work envelope is priceless.
If you have a DRO scale mounted on the back of the bed you lose almost nothing.