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New plinking gun

ogberi

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#1
Hi All,

Yep, I did fall off the face of the planet for a bit. Been a whole lot happen in the last year-ish. Been super busy at work, busy at home with the chickens, quail and turkeys. Also got married, refinanced the house, and blew out my right knee this time around. Waiting on an MRI later this month to determine if i need surgery.

For those that think of a pellet gun as a toy, here's a link to me shooting the latest plinking pellet gun I purchased.

It's a Benjamin Armada. .22 caliber, pre-charged pneumatic (PCP) powered, 1000+ FPS, ~30 ft/lbs of muzzle energy, bolt action with a 10 round magazine, and gets 30-35 consistent shots from a 3000 PSI fill. It'll crank out 40+ shots, but you can tell the power begins to drop a little after 40 rounds.

armada.jpg

Cheap to feed (about $8 for a tin of 500 pellets), so quiet you can carry on a conversation within a few feet of whomever is shooting, has enough power to drop everything up to coon/possum size, up to coyote size plus if you're a good headshot and can get 'em right in the brain pan. A little heavy, but the bipod negates that. The 4-16x56 scope brings everything right up to you, and the mil dot crosshairs make it easy to compensate for drop and wind. It will reach out to 100 yards without much trouble, as well. Factory installed silencer in the barrel shroud does a great job.

It's an awesome plinking, pest, and varmint gun. Plenty of rails to mount stuff on, MIL spec pistol grip and butt, any AR type MIL spec grip and butt fit. It isn't cheap, but fate smiled upon me and I found one for $300 off in a sporting goods store in Michigan. It replaces my Benjamin Trail XL 1500, which was another .22 caliber pellet gun with similar performance, but not as accurate or quiet.

Anybody else out there an avid air gunner?
 

pineyfolks

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#2
I have a pellet gun range out to 50yds with metal targets everywhere. We mostly shoot springer airguns .177 to 25 caliber. The whole family shoots there when they're home. It's very enjoyable and great practice. I've yet to purchase a pcp rifle.
 

RJSakowski

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For those that think of a pellet gun as a toy, here's a link to me shooting the latest plinking pellet gun I purchased.

It's a Benjamin Armada. .22 caliber, pre-charged pneumatic (PCP) powered, 1000+ FPS, ~30 ft/lbs of muzzle energy, bolt action with a 10 round magazine, and gets 30-35 consistent shots from a 3000 PSI fill. It'll crank out 40+ shots, but you can tell the power begins to drop a little after 40 rounds.


Cheap to feed (about $8 for a tin of 500 pellets), so quiet you can carry on a conversation within a few feet of whomever is shooting, has enough power to drop everything up to coon/possum size, up to coyote size plus if you're a good headshot and can get 'em right in the brain pan. A little heavy, but the bipod negates that. The 4-16x56 scope brings everything right up to you, and the mil dot crosshairs make it easy to compensate for drop and wind. It will reach out to 100 yards without much trouble, as well. Factory installed silencer in the barrel shroud does a great job.

It's an awesome plinking, pest, and varmint gun. Plenty of rails to mount stuff on, MIL spec pistol grip and butt, any AR type MIL spec grip and butt fit. It isn't cheap, but fate smiled upon me and I found one for $300 off in a sporting goods store in Michigan. It replaces my Benjamin Trail XL 1500, which was another .22 caliber pellet gun with similar performance, but not as accurate or quiet.

Anybody else out there an avid air gunner?
A few questions, please:
1. Every shot will decrease the pressure reservoir pressure slightly. Is the some sort of regulator to provide a constant pressure for each shot? If not have you noticed any change in down range ballistics from first to 40th shot?
2. What is your pellet weight? From your stated 30 ft. lbs. of energy at 1000 fps. it looks like about 14 gr.
3. What is the estimated pressure reservoir pressure after 40 shots? Based on the 3000 psi charge, the 215 cc pressure reservoir volume, I would guess somewhere around 2000 psi?

Thanks
 

Silverbullet

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#5
Haven't been able to afford the pcp air guns but have small arsenal of pellet guns even a shotgun. Yes an air shotgun. I have a .25 cal that I wouldn't be afraid hunting almost everything legal in NJ. Even deer close up. With the right pellets it will group ten shots in a quarter at 50 yds. Mine if a flyer happens I just need to clean the bore. I've shot humble bees at thirty ft with open sites off hand , have witnesses YUPP.
These aren't the red ryders we had as kids. You could watch the bb flying to the target.
 

ogberi

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A few questions, please:
1. Every shot will decrease the pressure reservoir pressure slightly. Is the some sort of regulator to provide a constant pressure for each shot? If not have you noticed any change in down range ballistics from first to 40th shot?
2. What is your pellet weight? From your stated 30 ft. lbs. of energy at 1000 fps. it looks like about 14 gr.
3. What is the estimated pressure reservoir pressure after 40 shots? Based on the 3000 psi charge, the 215 cc pressure reservoir volume, I would guess somewhere around 2000 psi?

Thanks
Hi RJ,

There's no regulator installed from the factory, but third party regulators are available for the gun. However, the physical action of the bolt and valve keep the shots pretty consistent until the tank gets down to around 1800 psi or so. Then you can tell it's dropping more (less velocity). The first 30 shots do slowly drop, but I tend to make up for it without thinking about it.

Yup, I'm shooting 14.3 grain Crosman domed hollow points. The gun isn't broken in yet, but it does seem to love the Crosmans. I also like the Benjamin Destroyer pellets, Reuger superpoints, and PolyMag shorts. I can get lighter pellets, but those tend to go supersonic and get loud. Sorta defeats the purpose of having a whisper quiet rifle. The jumbo heavy pellets sure do pack a whallop, but tend to start dropping noticeably at a higher pressure than the 14.3's.

I've put about 35 rounds through the gun, and from a 2900PSI charge it's now sitting just below 2000 PSI. I can probably get another magazine through it before the pellets start dropping too fast, but I generally refill it when it gets below 2000. Very good estimation!

Silverbullet, you're definitely correct that these aren't your old childhood guns. I used to shoot an old Daisy 499B in competitions, which is where I got my OCD for accuracy. My dad always loved when his friends would laugh at me practicing with it, then he'd bring me to regulation distance and have me stack the rounds in the bullseye until I goofed. They'd stop laughing real quick once they tried to do the same themselves. Never shot bumblebees, but I was hell on acorns, on or off the tree.

Getting started in PCP airguns... well, it isn't exactly cheap. But, remember that with the proper adapter, you can use any high pressure tank (3000+ PSI). As for the gun, I'm a bit biased. I like Benjamin guns, although Hatsan makes quality stuff. You should pick a gun that suits what you want to do with it. A carbine or bullpup is more suitable for mobile varmint elimination or hunting, whereas a long barreled rifle is good for shooting varmints or game at a distance or over bait. You do get what you pay for, just like with anything else. Me, I'm lazy and prefer to sit in the shade with a smoke and a beer and pick squirrels and crows off at a distance. Or sit outside at night and pick off rats as I can. Need to get a night-vision setup going now that I have a gun that won't beat the camcorder to death.

And if you get the chance, Benjamin makes a break action, nitrogen piston spring pistol in .177 that's darn fun to shoot. Looks like Han Solo's blaster. :)

Let me know if you have any other questions. I'm not a specialist in them, but I am an enthusiast.
 

master of none

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#7
Hey Shad,Glad to see you back,was wondering where you went to now I know,again glad to here about your nuptials. Rick
 

682bear

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#8
Both of my daughters shot 4H bb competitively with the Daisy 499... the gun is pretty cheaply made... but it is very accurate!

They have both competed in the Daisy National Championship... my oldest went once, my youngest has been twice. My youngest placed 49th out of over 500 shooters last month.

My oldest daughter graduated to 4H sporter rifle last year, shooting the Crosman PCP rifle, but just never really got comfortable with it.

They both can absolutely put me to shame with the 499, though...

-Bear
 

682bear

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#9
I have had a lot of fun shooting 'face spiders' out of their webs with the Crosman PCP... I call them face spiders because they always seem to hang right at face level when you are flying through the woods on a 4-wheeler...

-Bear
 

Silverbullet

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#10
I have the hatsan sniper with the power piston from pyramid air guns. The stock snapped in half at the back of the barrel channel. I was cocking it and it just plan snapped . Took about a week for free replacement . I'm a big man and this bugger will give you a real workout if you shoot it fifty times even with a rest it hurts muscles. But with open sights I can really get good hits. It came with a scope but don't need it for my island in Marlton . YUPP I said island , I get squirrels by the ten count , ground hogs , skunks. Even Fox in the winter besides the black birds and humble bees . Have chipmonks but I love them and no damage I've found , possums a couple times a year. One year I had five coons up a tree in my back half. Started to build an Airbus range till my gran daughter took over the spot. Ill make a rolling model some time.
 

eeler1

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Nice to see another airgunner/machinist on board. I've got a Marauder that was the ancestor of your gun. Now that I'm living in the city, can't shoot like you anymore, not jealous, just wishing I didn't have to drive to shoot.
 

FOMOGO

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#12
Hey Shad,Glad to see you back,was wondering where you went to now I know,again glad to here about your nuptials. Rick
Same here, congrats on the marriage, and the new plinker. Been pretty out of touch myself for the last 3 months and still have at least a month to go before I get back home to a somewhat normal life. Good to see you back, always enjoyed your posts. Cheers, Mike
 

JPigg55

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#13
A few questions, please:
1. Every shot will decrease the pressure reservoir pressure slightly. Is the some sort of regulator to provide a constant pressure for each shot? If not have you noticed any change in down range ballistics from first to 40th shot?
There are many YouTube videos that answer this, but, as Ogberi stated, most PCP's don't use a regulator.
Basically, two factors affect muzzle energy and velocity. One is the pellet mass (i.e. weight in grains). The other is speed.
Speed is determined by the differential pressure acting across the pellet as it moves down the barrel (i.e. acceleration).
On a PCP, the hammer is basically a weight that is accelerated by a spring that is compressed when you cock it.
When fired, this gives the hammer some amount of kinetic energy as the spring accelerates it towards the air reservoir valve.
Based on reservoir pressure, this determines the time and amount the valve is open and, as a result, the amount and pressure of the air released.
So at full pressure, the valve is only slightly opened for a short time. As the reservoir pressure drops, the valve is opened more and for longer releasing a larger amount of air at a lower pressure.
This pressure (actually differential pressure) behind the pellet starts to accelerate it down the barrel. As the differential pressure decreases so does the acceleration.
So here two factors affect total velocity based on acceleration, the amount of differential pressure as it moves down the barrel and time the differential pressure acts on the pellet.
Time is mostly a function of barrel length, the longer the barrel the more time the pressure can act upon the projectile.
The pressure, or more correctly differential pressure, is a function of expansion (volume) and barrel length.
As an example, at full pressure lets say the valve releases 1 cc of air at 3000 psi. As the pellet moves down the barrel this volume increases and the pressure resultantly decreases.
For this example let say the pellet moves the first inch down the barrel increasing the volume behind the pellet to 2 cc's. Based on Boyle's law (I believe), the pressure behind the pellet is now only 1500 psi and at 4cc's the pressure is now 750 psi. So as the pellet moves down the barrel, the differential pressure drops as does the acceleration.
Know lets say this dropped the reservoir pressure to 2800 psi. Since the valve will have approximately the same kinetic energy when fired, the valve will be open further and longer releasing more air at a lower pressure.
For the example, let's say it releases 2cc's of air at 2800 psi. The pellet must move twice as far down the barrel to get the same relative pressure drop, i.e half the original pressure.
So for the example, let's say it's 2 inches (1 cc per inch) until the pressure drops to 1400 psi and 4 more inches before it drops to 700 psi.
So in the first scenario, the pellet moves 3 inches when the pressure drops to 750 psi, but in the second the pellet has to move 6 inches before the pressure drops to 700 psi.
Even with a higher initial pressure, the pellet acceleration drops more rapidly in the first scenario due to the faster drop in differential pressure from the ever increasing volume behind the projectile as it moves down the barrel until it reaches the end of the barrel.

That's why if you look at a graph of pressure vs velocity, the muzzle velocity of a PCP air gun for any given pellet weight tends to increase slightly as the reservoir pressure drops to a point where the reservoir pressure lowers to where velocity starts to drop again.
 
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RJSakowski

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#14
So there is a regulation mechanism to attempt to maintain constant velocity through the pressure drop in the reservoir. Thanks for the explanation!
 

682bear

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My understanding of this is that the pressure in the reservoir is what closes the valve... so at full pressure, it closes the valve quicker, as the reservoir pressure drops, it takes longer for the lower pressure to overcome the striker spring and close the valve... thereby releasing slightly more air to push the pellet...

So, yes, it is self regulating...

-Bear
 

Mikebr5

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#16
I am an NRA instructor and about 6 months after Sandy Hook I had to change my teaching... I had a LOT of rimfire ammo before that... shocked me to run out.
Centerfire is no fun teaching for 1st time students for a few reasons, cost being right up there for most people, but I did teach some on SKS. Still not ideal.
I have a passel of children, most grown, but I still shoot with them on occasional family get together days. We started looking into the PCP and I was amazed at the improvements from the pump air guns from my childhood, like the Crosman 760.
My wife picked up a Benjamin Marauder in .25... Amazing gun. I love it but don't get to play with it enough.
 

george wilson

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#17
For heaven's sake! DON'T try shooting DEER or COYOTES with any pellet gun. It will MOST LIKELY injure the animal and cause it to live in pain forever. That is just cruel. There is a moral responsibility in killing animals to do it in a painless manner. Even a .243 center fire is often considered a minimal deer rifle.

I collect air rifles. A .22 with NO powder,just the primer,still seems to out penetrate all of them.
 

JPigg55

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For heaven's sake! DON'T try shooting DEER or COYOTES with any pellet gun. It will MOST LIKELY injure the animal and cause it to live in pain forever. That is just cruel. There is a moral responsibility in killing animals to do it in a painless manner.
While I agree with your sentiment, I don't like blanket statements such as this.
There are plenty of air rifles capable of being used for hunting as long as they're used within their capabilities.
I believe it comes down to the person using it. I've seen wild boar dropped with a .22 as well as ones get up and run away after being hit 3 times with a 30-06.

I'm quite sure many here can tout examples both for and against air rifles for hunting. As well as opinions for minimum sized firearm to be used for game and the reasons why.
I recently watched a YouTube video of a .45 cal air rifle penetrating 3/4" plywood at 600 yards. Within some standards, this would equate to enough power and penetration to take a deer at that range, but in no way would I (or the video maker) ever recommend trying such a thing.
The actual point of this video (titled "How far can an air rifle kill") was more to do with safety for knowing what lies beyond your target. Pointing out the potential lethality of even an air rifle at extreme ranges.

Blanket statements like "A .22 is not a weapon for self defense" even though there is empirical evidence that the .22 handgun has a higher "One Shot Stop" percentage than many other larger caliber weapons (this was from data collected across the nation from police departments and hospitals dealing with handgun shooting resulting in a one shot stop or death. By the numbers, the only caliber to out perform the .22 was the .45) tends to get my goat.

To me, this is like saying "You can't make a quality part with a Harbor Freight benchtop lathe."
Sorry for the rant, I haven't had enough coffee yet. LOL
And I do agree 100% with George in that one does have a moral responsibility, but at the same time, I would try to kill a deer with a pea shooter if I faced starvation.
 

strantor

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#19
When I outgrew my Power Wheels truck and Red Ryder BB gun I upgraded to a go-kart and a Benjamin 347:




That was a long time ago but the gun still works just fine. That thing was a blast. I recently dug it out to give to my kids. The butt stock is all scratched to hell from putting it between my feet to pump it up. I remember that being quite a PITA. pump it ten times, put your single pellet in, aim the open sights, and let 'er rip! Miss, repeat. probably took 30+ seconds between shots. I was damn accurate with it too, no scope. Could hit a bird off a wire from 30yds away. I was probably more accurate as a kid than I am now.
 

george wilson

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I don't recall the airguns being discussed being .45 caliber. There are some super large caliber air guns being made. In the Phillipines,I think.

In the early 19th. C.,some large caliber air guns were used by snipers in battle. French,if I recall correctly. They were so unsportsmanlike,the sniper using one would be executed. Their cast iron butt stock air flasks were pumped up by a large pump that looked like an early fire engine,pumped by several men. I don't recall how many times they could be fired before recharging.

Lewis and Clark carried one on their expedition. They awed the indians with it,since it was noiseless.

But,such airguns were and are in a completely different class than we are discussing here. Deer could be taken with such powerful air guns.

I am not a hunter,but once owned a perfectly nice Ruger #1 rifle in .243 caliber. Everyone kept saying it was insufficient for deer hunting. I can guarantee that it was many times more powerful than any air gun being discussed here.

My step father lived on a sort of farming community when he was young. He was told to kill a pig. He put out some food and while the pig was eating,he stood right over it,and shot it right in the brain. The pig just kept on eating!

By the way,Elmer Keith said that a minimum self defense caliber was a .357 magnum. He told a story about a sheriff ,mistakenly thinking a black cowboy for an outlaw,emptied his 9mm. Luger into the fellow. The cowboy said to him "Are you done shooting,white boy". Then he drew his .45 colt and killed the sheriff in one shot.

I think it was a bad move for the military to be re armed with 9mm automatics.

I'll stand with my blanket statement. If you are starving,I'd at least recommend a bow and proper arrows!:)
 

Navy Chief

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#21
There is no reason at all that a .243 could be used to hunt deer, they have taken thousands if not tens of thousands of them over the years. Same goes for larger caliber air rifles, no reason in the world they can't humanely take a deer. It is all about shot placement, not caliber. Larger caliber makes up for poor marksmanship by causing wound tract damage in poorly placed shots that allow for a successful kill in spite of the poor marksmanship.


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george wilson

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Define larger caliber air guns. If you refer to those used by snipers in the 19th. C.,or the Lewis and Clark gun,I would agree.
 

JPigg55

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By the way,Elmer Keith said that a minimum self defense caliber was a .357 magnum. He told a story about a sheriff ,mistakenly thinking a black cowboy for an outlaw,emptied his 9mm. Luger into the fellow. The cowboy said to him "Are you done shooting,white boy". Then he drew his .45 colt and killed the sheriff in one shot.
I'll stand with my blanket statement. If you are starving,I'd at least recommend a bow and proper arrows!:)
Didn't mean to start an argument.
There are many differing opinions on what constitutes a proper self defense weapon. However, it is a matter of fact and record that there are more people killed with a .22 each year than all other calibers.
In the study I mentioned, the .22 way out performed the 9 mm for 'One Shot Stops'.
While many people enjoy archery (my son being one), I think this is one of the least humane and slowest ways for an animal to die. I've never seen a deer drop dead from an arrow not to say it doesn't happen.

Here's a link to a YouTube video where a guy drops a 400# wild boar with a subsonic .22 round:
There are quite a few .22 and .25 cal PCP air rifles with more muzzle energy than a subsonic round from a .22 cal.
And yes, there are many larger caliber air guns as well, up to .50 cal I believe.
Oh BTW, take your micrometer and measure a .22 slug. Actual diameter is .223, yes the same as the M-16 as far as caliber.
 

Navy Chief

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Define larger caliber air guns. If you refer to those used by snipers in the 19th. C.,or the Lewis and Clark gun,I would agree.
Any of the newer air rifles that fire .45, .30, and .357 bullets at speeds equal to or greater than their powder powered equivalent. As has been mentioned there is a video on YouTube of one of the .45 caliber air rifles penetrating 2 layers of 3/4 plywood at 600 yards. These are not your typical off the shelf daisy or crossman air rifles.

http://www.airgundepot.com/airforce-texan.html


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JPigg55

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#25
Any of the newer air rifles that fire .45, .30, and .357 bullets at speeds equal to or greater than their powder powered equivalent. As has been mentioned there is a video on YouTube of one of the .45 caliber air rifles penetrating 2 layers of 3/4 plywood at 600 yards. These are not your typical off the shelf daisy or crossman air rifles.
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Unless someone develops an air gun capable of 20,000 + psi, they will never achieve speeds greater than their gun powder equivalent calibers, but that wasn't the point.
You are correct, none of the PCP air guns are your typical off the shelf Daisy or Crossman air guns. Yes, I agree a standard firearm is a better tool for the job than an air rifle for game animals.
My point was that certain air rifles are fully capable for the effective use in hunting even larger game animals.

Let me give you a different scenario. Most would agree that a nail gun is far superior to a hammer for driving nails. It's faster, less chance of damage due to missing the nail head, greatly reduced chance of nail bending, requires less user energy, and easier to use in tight places.
Both are designed and fully capable of driving a nail, but by the all encompassing, blanket statement way of thinking, we should never use a hammer to drive a nail as it is far inferior for the purpose.
Anyone here thrown away all their hammers for air nailers ???

Maybe a bad example since a hammer is more versatile for use with many types of nails, but you should get my drift.
I mean a .30-06 is far superior to a .22 (air rifle or powder gun) in bullet velocity, mass, and killing power. Would a .30-06 be far better choice to ensure a clean, painless kill of a squirrel ??? ABSOLUTELY
But I wouldn't use a .30-06 to shoot squirrels. Could I ??? Yes. Would I ??? No.
 

Bob La Londe

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#26
A typical PCP is designed (when properly tuned) such that the pressure in the reservoir prevents the tap valve from opening fully when the hammer strikes it. As more and more air is released the pressure drops and the valve opens further. This results in an increase in velocity as more air is released than with previous shots. Then as the pressure drops further the velocity starts to drop. If you graph the shots you get a bell curve in velocity numbers. Depending on the type of shooting you pick an area of the bell curve and count the shots. Typically you would graph pressure, velocity, and shot number. I've got a .25 Marauder that shoots 27-28 shots with 25.4 grain pellets from 3100 to 2200 with a velocity curve from 894 to 908 to 890 approximately. Most of the shots are 899-904. I spent quite a lot of time tuning and adjusting this rifle. Modified the valve for better flow characteristics, and did a lot of hammer and hammer spring modifications. If I recall that gives me about 45-46 ft/lbs of energy at the muzzle. The rifle can be tuned for more power, but this is ideal for what I use it for. I can easily drop a collared dove (I eat them) at 75 yards with a body shot. It will shoot through smaller rodent vermin at upto 100 yards. By through I mean through. With an exit hole. Its very quiet (internally suppressed) and costs next to nothing to shoot. I can fill it with a hand pump (which I have), from a scuba or SCBA tank (I have two SCBA tanks) or from a SCUBA or SCBA compressor. I have two compressors that will fill to 4500 PSI for my SCBA tanks, and just picked up an old WWII aircraft compressor with a gas motor that will fill to around 3000 PSI.

For what I use it for around my house it is superior to a firearm. My neighbors never complain about gunfire, I am able to control vermin easily, and my garden is safe from predation by birds when the seedlings are coming up. Because it is not (by federal law) a firearm it does not require a tax stamp to suppress it.

I could tune it for more power and shoot solid bullets with it to almost rival the energy of a 22LR when fired from a rifle, but then it would no longer fit my needs. Pellets loose energy quickly when down range. The have a poor ballistic coefficient. They could carry 800 yards (if fired up in the air at the right angle), but they won't have much energy when they get there. A heavier bullet at the same speeds would be dangerous enough to cause injury or damage at that range. They will also carry further due to a superior ballistic coefficient. With more energy it will be louder. I would get significantly fewer shots.

I also have a lighter .177 marauder that is regulated, produces right around 20ft/lbs, and gets about 90 shots per fill. The longest kill I have made with this gun was at 94 yards measured on a gopher that poked his head out of his burrow near the canal bank at the pack edge of my property. (Gopher burrows can cause concrete canals to collapse. It was the gun I had handy when I saw him pushing dirt. That's the gun I hand to guests to target shoot with when I have company. They can shoot and shoot and shoot with that one.

Now before anybody gets all excited. Some states treat airguns like firearms, and some (most) municipalities treat any projectile firing device the same as a firearm. If you live in an incorporated city or town you might be cited for plinking (discharging a firearm) with your airgun in your backyard.
 

george wilson

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#27
Jpigg: I think we were discussing SHOOTING DEER with a pwllet rifle,rather than squirrels,weren't we?
 

Bob La Londe

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#28
I CAN SHOOT DEER WITH AN AIR RIFLE. Drop them as easily as with a muzzle loader, but not approaching the ranges of a high power. AND I was giving an accurate and complete answer to this
1. Every shot will decrease the pressure reservoir pressure slightly. Is the some sort of regulator to provide a constant pressure for each shot? If not have you noticed any change in down range ballistics from first to 40th shot?
 

JPigg55

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#29
Jpigg: I think we were discussing SHOOTING DEER with a pwllet rifle,rather than squirrels,weren't we?
Ended up that way, got a bit off subject.
Originally, I was trying to answer a question as to how a PCP air gun maintains a fairly steady muzzle velocity without using a regulator.
When most people hear air rifle, they think of their childhood Red Rider BB gun or pump air rifle. These are definitely not for use in hunting anything beyond small critters.
PCP's are a different animal. Some should still only be used for small varmints. The bigger, more powerful ones still shoot pellets are referred to as pellet rifles.
If a pellet rifle is capable of shooting through a concrete block wall at 50 yards, it is powerful enough to kill a deer at that same range.
I move on as this really isn't pertinent to the OP or subsequent questions.
 

ogberi

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#30
Wow. Didn't expect to stir so much up by posting about a new plinker. :)

So let me clarify:
My wife and I live on 5 acres in rural Citrus County. We have chickens, quail, and turkeys. So we have to deal with pests. I don't use poison, don't like most traps, and using a stick is not a good option. So I shoot them. I enjoy plinking, so varminting is not a problem. A. 22 caliber pellet gun at around 1000 fps is plenty enough to drop a coyote with a shot to the brain pan. I know this, because I have done it.
Can the Armada kill a feral hog? Dunno, but I'd like to try. A deer? Dunno, but I'll pass on that.

It is absolutely effective on chipmunks, squirrels, rats, mice, raccoons and rabbits. so is a 22 rimfire shooting subsonic rounds. But the pellet gun is cheaper to feed, and a bit safer.
It's far from a toy, and a magnitude more dangerous than most pellet guns of yesteryear. Yet I still run into people who think of it as only suitable for shooting pop cans.

But the first time they hear the solid impact of a body shot on a rabbit and see it keel over stone dead instantly, they usually get the point that it is a serious gun. The hole *through* the rabbit hammers the point home.

For what I need it for, the Armada fits the bill to a T. Not the cheapest option, I admit. But still a fun, quiet, pants-crappingly accurate gun.

Now if Florida would only let us hunt Turkey with them...
 
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