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New...old Lathe

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homefactory

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Aug 16, 2016
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#1
Hello everyone,

I just made an offer on this machine and will find out in the coming week if I get it,
https://hgrinc.com/productDetail/Machine-Tools/Used-Monarch-Lathe/03160170002/

The machine is in Cleveland and I live in NOrth Canton Ohio

I am completely new to machining and will need a lot of help.

I really would like to find some one to maybe look at the machine with me, help me figure out what it needs ect.

I don't have a big budget, but I decided I wanted a quality machine and one I wont outgrow.

I am willing to take the time and put the work in to restore this war era machine,but, I dont know the procedures and also what is un-fixable.

If they except my offer I feel that parts alone would be worth it but I dont want a 7000lb paperweight.

Anyway thank you for looking and any advice or help you can offer.
 

brino

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#4
That Monarch is a beautiful big machine!

Two things occur to me that you want to check early:
1) Power. I do not see listed in the ad what voltage and phase this thing is, but it could be something you cannot easily/cheaply supply. Motors can certainly be changed and phase converters can power 3-phase motors from single phase power, but just be aware of any extra costs upfront. There are many folks here knowledgeable on phase converters.
2) The bed ways are usually the biggest show-stopper on older lathes. Excessive wear, dumb accidents (dropping chucks, etc) and plain old abuse can mess up the ways. They can be re-ground, but it's a very precise, very big job....and because of that can be expensive. Inspect them very closely. Most wear happens near the headstock. Check for worn spots by moving the carriage towards the headstock, tighten the carriage gibs so it just moves, then try to move the carriage all the way to the tail-stock. If you cannot go very far without loosening the carriage gibs again, it is likely due to wear.

Note that I am not saying the ways in the photo look bad, I just cannot tell. Most other things can be fixed or replaced (bearings, seals, lead-screws, etc.).

Good idea finding someone to go with you! :encourage:
My first lathe taught me a lot about what not to buy and why. I am glad it was a fairly cheap lesson.

The LeBlonde has a taper attachment, that might be useful to you.

-brino
 

homefactory

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Aug 16, 2016
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#5
That Monarch is a beautiful big machine!

Two things occur to me that you want to check early:
1) Power. I do not see listed in the ad what voltage and phase this thing is, but it could be something you cannot easily/cheaply supply. Motors can certainly be changed and phase converters can power 3-phase motors from single phase power, but just be aware of any extra costs upfront. There are many folks here knowledgeable on phase converters.
2) The bed ways are usually the biggest show-stopper on older lathes. Excessive wear, dumb accidents (dropping chucks, etc) and plain old abuse can mess up the ways. They can be re-ground, but it's a very precise, very big job....and because of that can be expensive. Inspect them very closely. Most wear happens near the headstock. Check for worn spots by moving the carriage towards the headstock, tighten the carriage gibs so it just moves, then try to move the carriage all the way to the tail-stock. If you cannot go very far without loosening the carriage gibs again, it is likely due to wear.

Note that I am not saying the ways in the photo look bad, I just cannot tell. Most other things can be fixed or replaced (bearings, seals, lead-screws, etc.).

Good idea finding someone to go with you! :encourage:
My first lathe taught me a lot about what not to buy and why. I am glad it was a fairly cheap lesson.

The LeBlonde has a taper attachment, that might be useful to you.

-brino
Holy cow! I honestly didn't see the taper attachmento_O I think that would be very useful and was actually a part I was worried about trying to track down after purchase.

From what I can find on the net, LeBlond's of this era (1944-1950) are great precision machines, while I wouldn't say there rare, they are less known and less available, so parts could be iffy/expensive.
 

caspaincmonster

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May 9, 2014
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#7
Cool old machine for sure but unless you have access to some unusually heavy equipment (like a large forklift) moving either of those machines safely but particularly the monarch will cost far more than you are probably thinking. 3 tons is not something to mess around with. I would suggest saving up more money and getting something smaller, newer and fully tooled, quality machines in good condition do not come cheap so if the price is too good to be true it usually is. As much as I don't like them personally, you really can't beat the value of a mid size Chinese machine.
L

Sent from my XT1072 using Tapatalk
 

talvare

Ted A
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Apr 4, 2016
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#8
Monarch lathes are wonderful machines, but personally, I just can't imagine using that Monarch lathe for hobby work, unless your hobbies involve machining very large items. A couple of things to consider with large older lathes are the available spindle speeds and ability to machine metric threads (if that is a concern to you). Many of those machines have very slow spindle speeds. Also, I have no idea what the chuck attachment method is on that machine, but it may be difficult to get smaller chucks more suitable for small work. That LeBlond is no lightweight either, but I think more suited for a hobbyist. There are many things to consider when purchasing a lathe, and especially when purchasing a used machine. Ask lots of questions and the idea of taking along someone knowledgeable is excellent. Just my $.02.

Ted
 

brino

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#10
There are a number of LeBlonde owners here, from all accounts they are great machines.
19x48" is still a large machine in my books, I believe you mentioned gun work in another thread.
This lathe should do that and more.

That price seems very good, as long as the condition is okay.
If in decent shape here, it would probably go for over $1000, easy and fast.

I hope it turns out well for you!
Exciting times.
-brino
 
Last edited:

randyjaco

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#11
Another great machine, but still mighty big. I am really curious as to what you plan on turning? In 15 years, the largest thing I have turned was 12" in diameter.

Randy
 
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