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Need Low Cost Autocad Replacement

JimDawson

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#31
Do you still have your old AutoCAD
If so you can get to work on Windows 10
The AutoCAD I have today is from 2000 and got to work on Windows 10

Dave

Can you explain how to do that? I have tried to get Acad 2000 to install on Win 7 and have had no luck. The 16 bit installer does not work at all on Win 7-64bit, and I've not been able to find a 32 bit installer that would work. I have tried manually installing it, with only partial success. Also trying ''run as'' has not been successful.
 

maker of things

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#32
Can you explain how to do that? I have tried to get Acad 2000 to install on Win 7 and have had no luck. The 16 bit installer does not work at all on Win 7-64bit, and I've not been able to find a 32 bit installer that would work. I have tried manually installing it, with only partial success. Also trying ''run as'' has not been successful.
I second that.
 

Smithdoor

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#33
Screenshot  VB.png VirtualBox by Oracle down load at http://www.virtualbox.org

This work as a operating system inside windows 10 or 8
You will need to install XP inside the VirtualBox
Then install AutoCAD
I use flash drive to move files back and forth

The other way is to buy a 32 bit installer
I like price of the Virtual Box and works with all 16 and 32 bit programs

Dave
 

joshua43214

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#34
A great deal of software that won't run on Win7 will run on Win8.1 or Win10.
I ran win8 since beta, and I really liked it on my desktop - extremely fast and stable.
Been running Win10 for a while now, and so far I am not too thrilled with it. Not near as fast and stable as Win8.1.
All my antique software that would not run on Win7 runs on Win10 though, including oddball things like some old games from the 90's.

Best bet is to just try and install it and see what it does. If it fails, use virtual box.
 

q20v

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#35
I just installed Autodesk Fusion 360 and the install / registration was very easy. I clicked around for a few minutes and it seems pretty good.. considering it's free 3D/2D CAD. Works on my Mac as well! This is very exciting.
 

q20v

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#36
Before the holidays I made a little hammer keychain for someone and spent a lot of time drawing it in AutoCAD 2002 Lite. The head is brass and the handle is stainless steel. I just drew it up in Fusion 360. Would have been nice to have drawn it in 3D before making it, definitely helps visualize the dimensions etc.


6174.png
 

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Chris Bettis

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#37
Not to take this to far off topic last cad cam i used was mastercam v2 just downloaded fusion 360 today and am a little overwhelmed anyone know of a good video tutorial on this?

Sent from my LG-LS980 using Tapatalk
 

q20v

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#39
Another perk of the Fusion 360 that I discovered on the weekend is that is includes a basic stress analysis add-on. I am blown away that Autodesk lets people download this for free for hobby use. Even the yearly commercial subscription isn't very expensive.
 

JimDawson

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#40
Can you explain how to do that? I have tried to get Acad 2000 to install on Win 7 and have had no luck. The 16 bit installer does not work at all on Win 7-64bit, and I've not been able to find a 32 bit installer that would work. I have tried manually installing it, with only partial success. Also trying ''run as'' has not been successful.
I finally have AutoCAD2000 running on Win7 Pro, and NOT running in XPmode. I have a need to now use Win7 and above as my operating system, so today I decided it was going to work. I manually installed it (copied the files over from an XP install, including the registry entries) and then manually edited the registry to get it to work. Had to chase the errors down one at a time. But it works.
 

Steve Shannon

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#41
I finally have AutoCAD2000 running on Win7 Pro, and NOT running in XPmode. I have a need to now use Win7 and above as my operating system, so today I decided it was going to work. I manually installed it (copied the files over from an XP install, including the registry entries) and then manually edited the registry to get it to work. Had to chase the errors down one at a time. But it works.
You win!


Steve Shannon, P.E.
 

Smithdoor

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#42
How many registries enters do I need to copy

Thank you
Dave

I finally have AutoCAD2000 running on Win7 Pro, and NOT running in XPmode. I have a need to now use Win7 and above as my operating system, so today I decided it was going to work. I manually installed it (copied the files over from an XP install, including the registry entries) and then manually edited the registry to get it to work. Had to chase the errors down one at a time. But it works.
 

JimDawson

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#43
What I did was to export all of the registry entries that said anything about AutoCAD from Regedit. Then I just waited for the errors to start popping up and corrected things one error at a time. Most of it was the file location pointers. The files were on my computer but the pointers were set to the wrong drives/folders. I have 5 physical hard drives in my computer with a dual boot so things can get a bit confusing. With a single HD, and only one OS, these problems might not occur.
 

jmarkwolf

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#45
I don't think I saw any mention of AutoCAD LT.

I gave up on AutoCAD years ago due to cost, and started using AutoCAD LT. Unfortunately, this is getting expensive also, consequently I'm still running AutoCAD LT 2010.

I recently purchased an AutoCAD LT "clone" from TurboCad. Seems to work pretty well and it was inexpensive. User interface very similar. Needed it to convert a newer DXF file format just the other day.

Have been meaning to try Draftsight, but am put off thinking support and upgrades would be less than forthcoming, being free.
 

4gsr

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#46
....snip......Have been meaning to try Draftsight, but am put off thinking support and upgrades would be less than forthcoming, being free.
I've been using Draftsight since its beginning, about five years now. There were several upgrades the first couple of years, but have not encountered any in the past two years. Of course, I've upgraded to the professional version of Draftsight. In fact, I have two seats of the professional version for my household.

I'm working on getting a usable 3D program for some of the work I do. The free 3D programs out there are just not what I want. They are fine for learning basic 3D in my opinion.
 

Steve Shannon

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#47
... Snipped to be specific The free 3D programs out there are just not what I want. They are fine for learning basic 3D in my opinion.
Does that assessment include 360 Fusion?


[emoji1010] Steve Shannon, P.E. [emoji1010]
 

Wobbles

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#48
Could anyone elaborate on the difference between 3 dimensional CAD and modelling software. Advantages, difficulty to learn, functionality, etc.?
Jim -
In my book there is none. There used to be a huge differences, but the speed of modern desktop computing has made all the differences disappear. These days the older terms have all turned into synonyms.

Modern modelers "build" the model just like you build a part. If you can envision how to make a part on a mill or lathe, then you can construct the model. So your machining experience really helps.

► The biggest jump in going from 2D to 3D is going to be the computing requirements. You'll probably need a better CPU with double the RAM.

► The second comes with experience in that you have to think about how the first part will interface with the second part. Will you extrude the first feature away from a datum plane, or will you extrude the first feature equally on both sides of the datum plane? Constructing a part away from a plane is handy when you want the part's edge to be your machining datum so that all dimensions are positive as measured from the edge. Constructing a part with a central datum is handy for turned parts or mirrored parts.

And you will want to assemble your parts to check hole alignments and clearances. It's much cheaper than waiting until the metal parts appear.
 

modela

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#49
A good CAD program should go well with the DRO that I am installing on my milling machine.
 

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#50
Im looking at a 3d modelling program to replace inventor? I use a work computer to play around with to learn but I just dont get how the programs thinks? Nothing is intuitive to me? I get that frustrated with the way it flips things around when you go from 3d to sketch.

I have turbocad and it just cant do what I want in 3d. I find 2d stuff fairly easy on any of them, im probably doing it wrong as I have had no training but I can get what i need out of it. But when it comes to 3d im stumped. Have been told solidworks is more intuitive than inventor but i can not afford that.
Any suggestions.
 

modela

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#51
I am hunting as well as you. They all have a heavy learning curve. When I was learning AutoCad, I purchased a workbook that ran through the whole process with projects along the way. I wish someone would write that.

Jim
 

Str8jacket

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#52
I am hunting as well as you. They all have a heavy learning curve. When I was learning AutoCad, I purchased a workbook that ran through the whole process with projects along the way. I wish someone would write that.

Jim
I have actually spent $400 on a training package that is very good for inventor. I just find some of the ways it does thing irritating. Plus its only at work. For home I simply cannot afford it. Solidworks is $12k a year or something ridiculous, ive blocked the email from my memory once i came too! So the hunt continues.
 

Bob Korves

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#53
Well, I will show my age here. All my training was with vellum and a T-square. I know that system well. I have tried some of the simpler drawing programs and get lost quickly there, though I must admit to giving up pretty easily. I can always use a 2H pencil, compass. and eraser and git-er-done.

I have a buddy who I did a project with recently and he was one of the nerds that wrote the original Autocad code when Autodesk was a tiny startup. He is an amazing software writer. He was using Google Sketchup to do the 2d drawings for our project...

Does anybody have a recommendation for somebody like me who just goes to paper and pencil when the going gets tough? Something with simple instructions so easy that even a dinosaur can understand them?
 

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#56
Well, I will show my age here. All my training was with vellum and a T-square. I know that system well. I have tried some of the simpler drawing programs and get lost quickly there, though I must admit to giving up pretty easily. I can always use a 2H pencil, compass. and eraser and git-er-done.

I have a buddy who I did a project with recently and he was one of the nerds that wrote the original Autocad code when Autodesk was a tiny startup. He is an amazing software writer. He was using Google Sketchup to do the 2d drawings for our project...

Does anybody have a recommendation for somebody like me who just goes to paper and pencil when the going gets tough? Something with simple instructions so easy that even a dinosaur can understand them?
Bob,

I'm pretty much in the same age group you're in, too. The engineering group I was in, in 1986 got our first CAD system dumped into our lap. To this day, I never did figure out how to do anything in that cad program. Three years later, we finally got management to buy us AutoCAD version 8 or was it 9, I believe it was. I was much easier to understand and use. Still had a tough time making it work. Your thought process is completely twisted up and tossed out the window. What you learned using the T-square and triangles is null and void with cad.

Moving forward today, I'm still using 2D cad in the AutoCAD format, but using the semi-free Draftsight as my software. For the last three years, Solidworks is knocking at my door and probably will be my next software to use. And the Vicious cycle starts over again of relearning how to draw! But this time in 3D.

I know this doesn't answer your question, not really sure I can alone. Maybe some else can tune in too.
Ken
 

TomS

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#57
Im looking at a 3d modelling program to replace inventor? I use a work computer to play around with to learn but I just dont get how the programs thinks? Nothing is intuitive to me? I get that frustrated with the way it flips things around when you go from 3d to sketch.

I have turbocad and it just cant do what I want in 3d. I find 2d stuff fairly easy on any of them, im probably doing it wrong as I have had no training but I can get what i need out of it. But when it comes to 3d im stumped. Have been told solidworks is more intuitive than inventor but i can not afford that.
Any suggestions.
I'm at the same crossroads as you. I use eMachineShop for 2D and 2.5D CAD and it works well. It also does 3D viewing and will export a 3D drawing. I've exported to Fusion 360 but I'm at a loss on how to use the program to do anything useful. It's me not the program. I just need to sit down at the computer and focus on learning how it works. Wish me luck.

Tom S.
 

ARKnack

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#58
Before the holidays I made a little hammer keychain for someone and spent a lot of time drawing it in AutoCAD 2002 Lite. The head is brass and the handle is stainless steel. I just drew it up in Fusion 360. Would have been nice to have drawn it in 3D before making it, definitely helps visualize the dimensions etc.


6174.png
That's a nice drawing but does it do dimension like a cad program does? I'm still stuck with paper. Can't seem to get on the cad wagon but would like to. Tried sketch up and hated it. Couldn't get the hang of turbo cad either.
 

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middle.road

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#59
This is a tad humorous, I'm trying to talk my Better Half into allowing me to put an old 5' oak drafting board in
the front room by the front windows after we get done remodeling. I've got a few ol' Vemco V-Tracks and I'd like
to setup it up as kind of an 'industrial art' interior design thing. Not sure if she's buying it...

I personally started off using AutoTrol back around '79 or '80, what a PITA. Then CADAM with it's light pen.
At that employer it was requested that I be moved to second shift because I was moving a bit too fast for the
Big Old IBM mainframe to keep up, and kept crashing it, annoying the finance & procurement departments.

AutoCAD has been around since '82 and I still have a version of 2.6 floating around, but I cut my teeth and really
delved into it with R9. That's when, IMO it started to get easier. Gone though was the personal, artistic touches that
I puts into a drawing when creating it manually.
It does make it easier and much quicker to create drawings, but it just doesn't have that 'personal' feel that you get
from a manual drawing. Perhaps rather akin to an artist and canvas.
 
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