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Need help newbie

Rc Sask

Iron
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Nov 11, 2016
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#1
Hello I recently purchased a used proxxon mf70 mini mill http://www.proxxon.com/en/micromot/27110.php
I know really nothing about milling I was wondering if anybody could help me with what tools I should have to able to safely try the mill out. Also is it good to start doing some random cuts on softer material to learn? I would like to do some aluminum work and maybe wood. Thanks for any advice
 

mikey

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#2
That mill takes really small cutters, with a max shank diameter of about 1/8" using the largest collet. With a speed range of 5K to 20K rpm, you're looking at carbide end mills and router bits. Carbide will cut fine in this speed range but they are tiny and brittle so you aren't going to be doing heavy cuts.

You need a milling vise and a small 1-2" screwless vise would work. Then you'll need some 2, 3 or 4 flute end mills in the largest shank size you can find to fit. Personally, I would concentrate on carbide end mills; HSS may not do well at really high speeds. You probably have to use drills that fit the collets that come with the machine - no drill chuck will adapt to the spindle.

You should be able to mill most materials but yes, aluminum is a good place to start. Wood and Delrin are also good starter materials.

This is a very light, high-speed machine for miniature work. The collet clamping system is probably not going to be all that accurate; it is similar to that used in a Dremel tool but with light cuts it should be okay to explore milling. I'm afraid the accessories that are used on most mills will not fit or be available to you but Dremel/Foredom sized accessories might fit.

Give it a go and see how you like it. If it piques your interest in metal work then look into a larger machine with a more standard configuration so you can outfit the machine properly.
 

Silverbullet

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#4
RS, welcome to the site, now your mill is great for small parts, hobby trains rc cars, clocks ,. But you can do some bigger items just takes time and no how. I'd suggest you watch as many YouTube videos on machine shop . Abom79 , doubleboost, Oxtool, Keith fenner , lots of them there but the best to start with Mr Pete 222. He's a shop teacher retired but a very good teacher. He's got 850 videos.
 

Old junk

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#5
Silver bullet is right ,all great mrpete I find to be the easiest to absorb.would have loved to sit in his classroom.
 

ch2co

Grumpy Old Man
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Jan 9, 2013
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#6
I Second/Third Silver bullet's post.

That is one cute little mill. I would have loved to have one of those in my lab years ago.

Welcome to the blog and keep us posted on any of your mills' exploits. We LOVE pictures.:)

CHuck the grumpy old guy"
 

Rc Sask

Iron
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Nov 11, 2016
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#7
Thanks guys I will definitely check out mrpete YouTube for some videos. I will post pics once I receive it. With Easter long weekend is seems go be taking for ever. I'm hopping this mill will be good for some of my plans but also a nice stepping stone to a larger mill if I get bit by the bug.