• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.
  • PLEASE: Read the FORUM RULES BEFORE registering!

need help again

casca92

MURPHY:Was an optimist ,when compared to me
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2017
Messages
52
Likes
14
#1
I need some simple views of setting tool height with a ruler you know to HIGH to low JUST right.
I keep forgetting which is which. perhaps if I get some good examples I can get them laminated at magnet them in plain and open view.

I know but every time I learn something new, something old gets lost in the memory for ever.

KISS
thank you
kerry
 

casca92

MURPHY:Was an optimist ,when compared to me
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2017
Messages
52
Likes
14
#2
having trouble remembering direction for setting height with a ruler
would anyone have some KISS method drawing =photos
on which way the ruler leans is high or low want to laminate some pictures to magnet to my lathe for quick reference

or even a easier way would be ok. more ideas the better.
I was in the army for awhile so keep it at that grade level.
thanks
Kerry
 

Ed ke6bnl

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2014
Messages
415
Likes
143
#5
I guess you mean if the scale is placed against the part and held with the tooling pushed against it, if the top of the rule is pushed away from the operator it the tool height is too high if it is leaning toward the operator it is too low of a setting. Just right will be straight up and down.
 

kvt

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Oct 21, 2014
Messages
1,653
Likes
724
#6
I like the that Joe Pieczynski does, but have not made one yet, as have no gauge pens etc to use at this point. But
have found that using the ruler method is not real good but will do in a pinch. The reason is that you may not realy be able to see the tilt, and based on the size of the object that your are up aginst will determin the tilt also. Think of it this way, A larger around piece and you can hit a wider area with the rule and will not tilt as much, but with a small item your move just a little and it will tilt easier. I have done that then use a facing cut to verify or adjust to get it better on center. by feeling the little nib, and ajusting until it just removes it. If it is removed, then I lower till it makes one then back up to just removing it. I have also seen a couple of others, One is from Edge, taht is on a bar of known size, you chuck it up then put the the little piece attached to it on the tool and see if the bubble shows it is level. The other is similar, it has a V and a level that sits on the tip of the tool, and you push it up against the work. Then raise and lower the tool until the bubble is level. Do not really trust eather of them as your system has to be perfectly level to the ground that way.
 

Wreck™Wreck

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2014
Messages
1,918
Likes
1,462
#7
I am not a professional Youtube "How To" video producer.
I have worked in machine shops full time for 25+ years so the way I do it is probably wrong. Place a piece of stock in the chuck/collet, choose a tool that will face and run it across and adjust the height until the nub disappears, measure with a ruler from the ways to the tool and write this value on the front of the machine. Use this height to set the tools and it will be more then close enough for general lathe work and is far simpler.
 
Last edited:

Glenn Brooks

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2014
Messages
650
Likes
664
#8
Kerry, one way to learn it (the ruler trick) is hold the rule up against the work - with the cutter dialed up way high - almost to the top of the work if necessary. Then crank the tool holder in towards the work until it pinches the rule. Watch what happens - the cutter will push the ruler over to almost flat position. After a couple of try's you'll get the hang of it.

Finally - if you want to be dead nuts on center - take a light facing cut. If your tooling is a bit high or,low, you will see a small nub sticking out from the end of the work after your facing cut. Move the tool tip a smidge up or down and take another cut. When you are perfectly in center, the cutter will remove the nub.

Glenn
 

brino

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2014
Messages
2,843
Likes
2,618
#9
Hi Kerry,

As you say the "the more ideas the better"........so here's mine.

Just grab a 6-inch scale and try it with your finger tips.
Grab the "ruler" between the tips of your two "pointer fingers" with a light touch.
Look at the side (thin edge) of the ruler and try it.
With two fingers aligned the ruler will the vertical.
When you drop one slightly the top of the ruler moves to that side.

So use that as the "rule" (no pun intended): "The top of the ruler points towards the low side!"

Once you do it a few times I suspect it'll be second nature to you.

-brino
 

Asm109

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2017
Messages
69
Likes
77
#10
The Hardinge lathes in our shop had a tool height setting gage. It was a cylinder with a tapped hole in the center top.
Another short cylinder with an eccentric hole was bolted on top.
The tool sat on the top of the cross slide, You adjusted the height of the tool until it just kissed the underside of the eccentric piece.
The height of the gage was made to put the tool on center.
 

Bob Korves

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Messages
4,030
Likes
4,174
#11
Hopefully not to complicate this too much, but I also use the ruler method on the back side of turned work to set the tool height for boring. The ruler will not fit in the bore, but the back side of the work can be a surrogate. The readings will be opposite in this mode, but still intuitively the same. And actually, there are times when you do NOT want the cutter to be on center. Some cutoff operations, and some boring operations come immediately to mind, and there are others as well.. For some work, the simple ruler method is not accurate enough, stuff like cutting a Morse taper or dialing in to a precise diameter, internal or external. For average turning, the rule against the turned work is plenty close enough.
 

Glenn Brooks

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2014
Messages
650
Likes
664
#12
Bob, I never knew about setting a different tool height for turning Morse Taper. What should I look for and how do you measure tool height in this case?

Glenn
 

jlsmithseven

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2017
Messages
181
Likes
166
#13
If top of ruler is pointed towards you, it's too low.
If top of ruler points towards back of machine, it's too high.
 

Bob Korves

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Messages
4,030
Likes
4,174
#14
Bob, I never knew about setting a different tool height for turning Morse Taper. What should I look for and how do you measure tool height in this case?

Glenn
The tool (and indicator for setting it up) need to be set to the exact lathe center height to cut an accurate taper. I was pointing that out as the opposite of "good enough."
 

4ssss

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2017
Messages
140
Likes
77
#17
Eyeball it, face off the piece, and center your tool on the dimple it leaves behind. This isn't rocket science and not as big a deal as some make it out to be.
 

Silverbullet

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
May 4, 2015
Messages
2,348
Likes
1,058
#18
I am not a professional Youtube "How To" video producer.
I have worked in machine shops full time for 25+ years so the way I do it is probably wrong. Place a piece of stock in the chuck/collet, choose a tool that will face and run it across and adjust the height until the nub disappears, measure with a ruler from the ways to the tool and write this value on the front of the machine. Use this height to set the tools and it will be more then close enough for general lathe work and is far simpler.
YUPP it's the way our vokie teachers taught us . And that was with old style rocker tool post to boot. In that way the old tool post was better.
 

DHJ

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2015
Messages
24
Likes
18
#20
For most work I use the 6" ruler, I have a vertical line drawn on the headstock to sight against,makes vertical easier to see for me.
DHJ
 
Container Above bottom breadcrumb