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  1. gspen60676@aol.com

    gspen60676@aol.com United States Iron Registered Member

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    I have a 1/2 hp motor just newly installed that after running for a bit just stops. This is a new motor and replaces a new motor with the same problem. Ask question so I can answer. Patrick
     
  2. JPigg55

    JPigg55 United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Could be thermal overload tripping. Can you post pictures of the wiring set-up ??? Is it 110v or 220v ???
    If two new motors doing the same thing, has to be in the wiring or the worst luck.
    Check your incoming voltage (with motor running if possible). If it's low, that will increase motor current and cause the thermals to trip.
    Some motors have auto resetting thermals, some have a reset button.
    Low voltage can be from too small of incoming wire, loose connection, corrosion, wire run too long for size, or a combination thereof.
     
    cathead likes this.
  3. Dave Paine

    Dave Paine United States Active Member Active Member

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    Good idea. Eliminate this variable first.

    On a wood turning forum a person was seeing a Low Voltage code on his VFD. He checked the voltage at the terminals without the lathe running and said it was normal. Eventually he was able to check the voltage with some load and it turned out that under a load he did not have sufficient voltage. In this case he had nicked his underground cable so one of the wires was not making good contact. Sufficient contact to show voltage, but not to carry current.
     
  4. benmychree

    benmychree United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Also check to see if the motor is connected for the proper voltage.
     
  5. gspen60676@aol.com

    gspen60676@aol.com United States Iron Registered Member

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    20170516_160548.jpg 20170422_164436.jpg 20170511_165855.jpg Thanks for your answers, it a 115/208-230, 9.4 amp 1/2hp and I suspected the problem is in the wiring, the motor wiring is confirmed with grainger help line so I'm sure it's correct. Wired for 230 and reverse rotation. Patrick
     
  6. gspen60676@aol.com

    gspen60676@aol.com United States Iron Registered Member

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    I replaced the ground wire but after I get home i'm going to go through each wire and connection including voltage.
     
  7. Silverbullet

    Silverbullet Active Member Active Member

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    Ck your switch , loose or burnt contacts . Wire to small for current draw , has to be a brake or loose connection. Take the old motor and mount a plug and plug it in on another circuit if it runs ok I'd say you better get an electrician to Ck the one your using.
     
  8. markba633csi

    markba633csi United States Active Member Active Member

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    Hi Patrick let us know if you haven't found the problem yet, I have some experience and I'm local to you
    Mark S.
     
  9. JPigg55

    JPigg55 United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I see it's a dual voltage motor and looks to be wired for 110v.
    a.jpg

    If you're connecting it to 220v, that's why it's tripping.

    b.jpg

    If you're hooked up 220v, move brown wire to terminal #3 and move white wire to terminal #5 where you removed the brown wire.
    If rotation needs reversed, switch red and black wires.
    Connect lead in wires: black to terminal #1 and white to terminal #6.
    This is a single direction operation hook-up. If your application is for bi-directional operation you will need to have a three wire supply and wiring will be different.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2017
  10. Silverbullet

    Silverbullet Active Member Active Member

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    Geezs why didn't I look at the diagram. I read his reply on talking to graingers and figured it must be right Dah moment on my part .
     

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