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Mobile Base For A Mill?

Discussion in 'MACHINE ACCESSORIES (Tables, Vises, Indexers)' started by Alan H, Dec 20, 2016.

  1. Alan H

    Alan H United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I am outfitting a new PM935TV knee mill and want to put a mobile stand under it. I have the equipment to fabricate one.

    When adding a stand, I also want to give it a little wider stance since the mill's footprint is a touch narrow and I don't intend to bolt it down.

    Perhaps someone has used CARRYMASTER or FOOT MASTER combined leveler/casters?

    So I am looking for ideas and solutions you have found or put into place for a mobile base under a milling machine.

    By the way, the mill will be about 1600 pounds plus the weight of a stand when outfitted. Here she sits and I may want to put her in and out of that corner, time will tell.
    landed in its spot.jpg
     
  2. Bob Korves

    Bob Korves H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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  3. Subwayrocket

    Subwayrocket United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    This is the base I built for the 935 . I originally built this for a different mill , then when I got the 935 I cut the base in half and lengthened it to fit the 935 . Although it was stable, I decided to widen the foot print with the removable part you see replacing one of the bolts on the casters (2nd pic down). It is just a piece of 1" bar stock with 3/8-16 tapped into each end and a hex machined in the middle . I also added two more feet in the middle of the base , these are just 1/2-13 coupling nuts welded on the side . The casters are SSC .
    Two people can roll it out for periodic cleaning/maint .
    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    10Done.jpg
    12Outrigger.jpg
    1BaseForAnotherMill.jpg 5BoxedOutBoltHoles_inFrame.jpg 9TigginMiggin.jpg
    --------------------------------------------------------------------
    original base parted in half , lengths added , holes for plug welds, jigged up for welding
    2BaseParted.jpg
    7ClampedTop.jpg
     

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    Last edited: Dec 22, 2016
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  4. Dabbler

    Dabbler Active Member Active Member

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    that is a very impressive rolling stand!!!
     
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  5. Subwayrocket

    Subwayrocket United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Thanks. I wanted relative mobility, casters , but didn't want to raise it 7 inches , that's why I did it like this .
    If you have a scrapyard, (or ebay) look for Albion or SSC casters.
    The bottom of the mill is raised 5-1/2 inches putting the top of my vise at hanging elbow height , I am 5'9" .
    Whatever you build, u generally want to make it such that the top of the table or vise at the same height of your elbow when standing .
    Hope this gives you some idea's H&A , or anyone wanting a lower profile mobile base .
     
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  6. arvidj

    arvidj United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Possibly a steel frame around the base and a [possibly modified] pallet jack when you need to pick it up and move it?
     
  7. firestopper

    firestopper H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    We built this one a couple of months back. The mill would end up 1" off the ground and the castor brackets gave it a little wider stance with stable results.
    This machine weighed in around 3800 pounds and rolled nice with moderate effort. The four leveling feet adjust quite easily with a 8" crescent wrench.
    The hole you see lines up with the coolant tank drain on the back of the mill. I'm sure you could use lighter material for your 1600 lb. machine.

    IMG_0095.JPG
    IMG_0070.JPG IMG_0074.JPG IMG_0189.JPG
     
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  8. Alan H

    Alan H United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Paco,
    Wow! That is one outstanding piece of art as Mark calls it!
    • Who's casters did you use?
    • Is that 4" angle? What is the wall thickness?
    • How did you brake that steel plate for the caster mounts?
    Thanks for posting all the detailed photos. I really like your use of the box/tubing sections for the gussets and the leveler supports. Really top notch work and a well thought out design.
     
  9. Alan H

    Alan H United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Thanks for all the photos and your mods to fit to a 935. I am grateful for you taking the time to share your good ideas here.

    I agree fully with your tip on the Albion casters. I have some under a weld/fab table and also under a KMG belt grinder and they are very good. I bought them on Amazon at a decent price.

    Your height tip is a good one too. As you know the 935 is a touch low and so raising it up is a good thing. I have seen some examples of raising them up even without the casters.
     
  10. mksj

    mksj Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    The casters are 5" Service Master, they are cheaper ($112 for 4 shipped) if purchased through eBay than directly from the company (due to shipping cost). The Albion are a bit nicer, but you role the mill in place and than raise it and you are done. Some people use the FootMaster rolling/leveling feet, but a larger roller is easier to push. The leveling feet were 4" tall attached with ~1" threaded supports welded to the base. We raised the machine and put spacers between the casters and the mounts for ground clearance when transporting the mill. If you are not moving the mill once parked, you could have bolt on wheel brackets.
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/5-Heavy-Dut...lyurethane-on-Iron-Core-1000-lbs-/32167315653
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/4-FootMaste...er-Leveling-Pad-1100-Pounds-New-/132037408679
     
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  11. Groundhog

    Groundhog United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Although my mill is a lot smaller (table top Syil X4 CNC) this leveling idea might be of interest. I used 3 HF's short body mount 10 ton rams (1.75" tall). The rams are bolted to shim blocks as the ram travel is only 7/16". They are attached by hoses to a manifold made of 3 1/4" ball valves and brass nipples. Hidden in the left rear of the picture is a port-o-power screw-on coupler. To level the mill I open the desired valve and pump until it is at the level I need, then close the valve while still under pressure. When all three rams are where I want them I remove the port-o-power pump. I've left it untouched for more than a year with no leak down.
     

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  12. firestopper

    firestopper H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Thanks for the compliment sir. As Mark chimed in on the castors, I can answer the material used and the breaking of the cold rolled flat bar (3/8" x 4").
    The 4" angle is 3/8" thick and was notched on iron worker for a good weld joint. This type of notch provided an additional 2" of weld vs a miter joint. The castor brackets where broken using the iron worker as well. Once the limit switches are set, one simply insets the piece (squarely) and steps on the foot switch until the machine stops. I built a custom table and back gauge for the break making set up simple.
    IMG_0019.JPG
    IMG_0018.JPG
    This photo shows the break on the iron worker. It shares the same station that would utilize the punch station.
    IMG_1785.JPG
    The broken (bent) stack. I made four extra for the plate roller (comping soon....more like 9-12 months). The boxed section is 1/4"x2"x3". The miter was 22.5 degrees foe a parallel finish (to the floor).
    IMG_0043.JPG
    IMG_0052.JPG
    The same section of rectangular tubing was used for the leveling feet. Four threaded spools where turned/threaded on the lathe and indexed into the holes of the brackets for welding.
    IMG_0053.JPG
    IMG_0055.JPG
    Last photo shows a annular cutter used for a near perfect hole. These annular cutters can be used on the lathe with a tail stock arbor/adaptor. I also use them with a Mag drill as intended.
    IMG_0027.JPG
    I had posted these (or some) in the POTD some time back so I will apologize in advance for those who's already seen these. I want folks to see different applications/options when it comes to material choice etc. Mark J has helped me and others so its only fitting to return the favor.
     
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  13. Alan H

    Alan H United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    So I am blown away again Paco. You have some really fine fabrication equipment! More importantly you have the skill to go with it. Thanks for taking the time to post the photos and the details. It is big fun to have a look at your equipment.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2016
  14. Subwayrocket

    Subwayrocket United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    That thing is a TANK ! I likey
     
  15. firestopper

    firestopper H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Thanks gents, It all began when my new bride bought me a Makita 14" chop saw, 4" Makita grinder and a Millermatic 200 for Christmas in 1987. We where married Dec 21, 1987 so its cool to relate to what the "starter set" had grown to in 29 years, and the wife decided to keep me around;)
    Merry Christmas
     
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  16. tq60

    tq60 United States Active Member Active Member

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    A pallet jack is the correct tool.

    The carts in this thread are great looking work but proper materials would cost same as pallet jack and cart only good for mill.

    Our BP is currently on a pallet of wood as is most everything else with plans on making a steel stand size of pallet.

    The jack is 27 inches wide so best is a steel plate with channel that mill is bolted to then easy to lift and move as needed.

    Our L&S is on wood stands that allow it to be moved with 2 jacks...

    All machines can be moved with the jack or fork lift so build it once.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk
     
  17. Alan H

    Alan H United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    TQ, pallet jack is a good idea and I am glad you have space for it.

    I would not want any of my equipment on wooden pallets. I want them rigid and level.

    In my case it is not about cost. It's that I don't want another piece of equipment to store. I have 10 pounds of stuff in a 7 pound sack already and simply do not wish to have a pallet jack taking up floor space.
     
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  18. tq60

    tq60 United States Active Member Active Member

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    Wood is plenty strong and stable for a mill.

    Our plan is someday make steel platforms with other add ons but that is money and time budgeted for other things.

    Storing jack is issue but clever addresses that by having it go forks under a machine or bench.

    3 2 X 4 as skids with 2 X 6 across the top with good screws makes for a very sound platform

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk
     
  19. Tim9

    Tim9 United States Iron Registered Member

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    I agree that wood is fine and a pallet jack plus wood bases...or pallets, are a good way to go. There is also an advantage to the wood when it comes to vibration on a mill. But I totally also agree that pallet jacks take up a lot of space. And if I had time and the motivation....I would much rather have dedicated rigid steel bases on all of my equipment.
     
  20. tq60

    tq60 United States Active Member Active Member

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    We have 2 pallet jacks in our cluttered shop and neither one us in the way at all (that is the function of the other stuff we do not need piled in front of them) but one lives under our electrolysis rust machine (trash can, batteries and power plant built on a pallet like platform) and the other one is usually under the diesel tank or the racking in a corner.

    In tight places they can go under a work bench that is cleverly placed as the forks are less than 4 inched tall when lowered so just the handle and jack need to be placed.

    In a garage it is difficult but also building a machine specific platform capable of supporting 2000 pounds while moving also consumes floor space and resources as well.

    If you build a roll platform do not go cheap on casters as they are critical.

    Steel ones do not roll very well on anything but perfect concrete and larger diameter ones have higher lever action or moment of force against the mount requiring heavier frame.

    Having adjustable feet made of say 5/8 all thread or good bolts would allow load to be removed from casters and reduce need for brakes.

    The Carr above is great work by the way.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk
     
  21. Todd_71

    Todd_71 United States Steel Registered Member

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    Paco,

    Amazing job! I love the design. I'm working on a similar project for a PM930 I just purchased and I'm concerned about the casters.
    The reason being is that I recently got a set of similar casters (4" heavy duty casters from Grizzly http://www.grizzly.com/products/4-Heavy-Duty-Swivel-Caster-w-Brake/G8176) and put them on a cart I built but they have a mind of their own when trying to move the cart. One set goes one direction while the other is going the other which is ok, but more troubling is that it is difficult to get them to change direction. Mind you they are on a cart that may way 300 LB, nothing in comparison to what you have on yours. How easy is it to maneuver with these wheels you have purchased with the mill? They look awfully similar to the ones I got from Grizzly. I suspect because they are so wide and flat they don't like to pivot.
    I bought two fixed casters to replace 2 on the original cart so I was hoping to use the two I have but if what you have is working well then I may fork out the money to buy a set, but I'd like to confirm that and exactly what you have. Thanks!

    Todd
     
  22. firestopper

    firestopper H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Hi Todd,

    I have used four swivel castors on certain applications only to have the ability to rotate in limited spaces. Ideally if you have the space then go with two fixed and two swivel but the four swivel do work with moderate effort. I'm not a big guy and had no real issue pushing the machine enough to orient the castors. The trick is to keep moving and adjusting toward the direction you want. If you have another person, then its a piece of cake. As far as the Grizzly castors, they look similar to the Service castors Mark (mksj) provided for this project, but can't be 100% they are the same. I have been using this company for some time and they are located in Reading, PA.http://www.ebay.com/itm/5-Heavy-Dut...lyurethane-on-Iron-Core-1000-lbs-/32167315653. I grease the swivel bearings prior to install, the hub bearing are sealed and don't require grease.
    Sorry for the late reply, I just found your question this morning.

    Paco
     
  23. Todd_71

    Todd_71 United States Steel Registered Member

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    Thank Paco! 4 swivel is a must for me as well. Mine seem to be lubed but I'll try lubing mine and see if that helps, before I make a decision.
    I can't tell from the picture, but are the wheels you have flat or do they have a slight crown to them?

    Todd
     
  24. ewkearns

    ewkearns United States Active Member Active Member

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    Well, I'm having to downsize and I'm trying to pound that 10# of _____ into a 5# sack. I love this mobility, though I can see some engineering challenges with the K&T Model "D." Now, my mind is wandering toward roll around lathes (TUM 14 X 40, TOS 16 X 60, W&S #4). Anybody try that, yet???
     
  25. firestopper

    firestopper H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Todd,

    The castors wheels are flat.

    Paco
     

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