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mill questions

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SE18

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#1
I recently bought a 8530 Clausing Mill and am trying to get the hang of milling.

First, I accidentally ran the end mill in reverse. This seems to have affected the cutting ability. Correct?

another rookie question. In using the end mill to side mill a piece of steel (conventional milling), I'm seeing the mill actually move upwards from the work.

The work is not moving in the vice and I locked down the up/down levers; and, I tightened the acorn nut holding the collet; and I ensured the set screw holding the end mill is tight. Also, I ensured that the up/down quill is locked so the mill is not supposed to move from it's set position. What is causing the end mill to rapidly climb up?

I did unlock the quill and was able to manually hold the end mill in place and mill but that is not a good solution.

Thanks
 

westsailpat

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#2
I had a mill that even though I had the quill locked it could slip up . I would just put the quill all the way up and lock it .
 

T Bredehoft

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#3
Is this the same end mill that was run in reverse? a loose end mill generally pulls out of the collet, downward.
 

SE18

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#4
Tom, yes.

Mark, that did the trick, but still, I'm wondering how it moved up on its own.

Thanks
 

westsailpat

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#5
Likely it moved up because the pressure just naturally pushes the quill up . On my mill the spindle lock had just worn out , I shimmed it and that helped . But after scraping some parts I never trusted it . When I needed the quill down while milling I would use a quill stop but instead of using it to stop the quill from going down I would put on top of the mills quill stop .
https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_fr...quill+stop.TRS0&_nkw=mill+quill+stop&_sacat=0
 

JimDawson

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#6
Don't feel bad, we've all been there. :) Running an end mill in reverse will pretty much destroy the cutting edges instantly. Either grind a lathe tool out of it or sent it out for resharpening.

Normally a standard right hand spiral end mill wants to pull down when cutting. Never seen one try to push up. Don't know what's going on there.
 

SE18

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#7
Mark, thanks for pointing me to these devices. So yes, it appears that the quill lock has worn out on mine. I'll get one of these stops; yours are Bridgport so I'll have to look for Clausing.

Jim, thanks for the tip. Yes, it would make a nice lathe tool and now I don't feel so bad about doing something so stupid.
 

Ulma Doctor

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#8
Yes, it would make a nice lathe tool and now I don't feel so bad about doing something so stupid.
don't ever feel bad for making a mistake.
if it were not for making mistakes, i would not have learned half of what i know. (that couldn't fill a thimble anyway)
make the mistakes, you will not be less than if you do
i was told long ago, that a master makes mistakes, but is really good at covering them up
 

terrywerm

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#9
Making mistakes is the best way to learn, even though it can get expensive. But, the more expensive the mistake, the better the lesson!

I have seen end mills move up when face milling a surface. I've seen them move down, too, for that matter. R8 collets have much greater clamping pressure on end mills than #2 morse taper collets do, as used on the Clausing 8520, so end mill creep is less common on machines that use R8s. For that reason, I no longer use collets for milling on my 8520, but have purchased end mill holders in the various sizes that I need. No more trouble with end mills creeping up or down. MT2 end mill holders with the 3/8" drawbar thread can be hard to find, but they are out there. I've found them on eBay and Shars carries some as well.
 

SE18

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#11
Hi all, there's a nut and 2 screws on the column that I tightened and that seemed to do the trick.

Possible 2nd problem:

I put my finger inside the tapered quill and it seems a bit rough. I'm thinking in the past, something like a collet or drill was spinning and may have caused some damage, but seems to be working fine. Anyone else come across that? Is there anything I should be concerned about with that.
 

NortonDommi

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#12
Burrs are not good as they prevent the taper seating properly. Have you got a good male taper? It would need to be open end that you can blue and check the contact. If there are slight burrs you may be able to remove them with a 1/2 round scraper.
 

SE18

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#13
Thanks. is a 1/2 round scraper same as a 1/2" round file? I've got one.
 

SE18

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#15
I'm at a loss. I did extensive searches for 1/2 round scrapper but what came up is wood turning tool. Might that be the one?
 

NortonDommi

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#16
1/2 round scraper same in cross section as a 1/2 round file yes. working area of blade is fairly short and has a slight bend in the end to allow scraping a particular spot. I'll take a photo of one today and post tonight. Keep your eyes open for secondhand scrapers as many people don't know what they are and they can be picked up cheap or even free and often are the best or only tool to do a job. If you work on machinery you can't do without them.
 

NortonDommi

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#17
Here's a couple of pics of scrapers that could be used. A finish reamer would be better if you can lay hands on one. Reguardless I would have a good look with a torch and check with an arbor and blue before doing anything.
Sorry for the crap quality. 1st photo top is 1/2 round, bottom 3-square. Either can be used.
 

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