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Leaning towards a PM-1030V as a first lathe, check my logic?

Discussion in 'PRECISION-MATTHEWS' started by jung4g, Aug 22, 2017.

  1. jung4g

    jung4g United States Iron Registered Member

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    Here's some background of where I'm coming from and how I landed on the PM-1030v as a first machine to get:
    While I can't afford to just buy a professional machine shop, I can see the value in paying more for good tools that will last a bit longer and be less likely to be outgrown very quickly.

    As I suspect is typical for many people new to this hobby, I ended up looking at Grizzly's options and sorting by price, low to high. Honestly the micro lathe was tempting at first due to price, figuring since I would be working on some small stuff for the most part, but the lack of power made me quickly realize, a 7X was the bare minimum I should consider.

    So from that, I looked at the G0765 from Grizzly. For $615, it seems a reasonable first machine. But after replacing the dumb bearings and plastic spindle gears, you're out a fair amount of time and even more money. Add on the needed 4 jaw, QCTP, and some essential tooling, and shipping, and you're at $1000 very quickly. Once you hit $1000, you can consider the basic bigger 8X and 9X Lathes from Grizzly that come with a 3 And 4 jaw, bigger motors, etc. I looked at every model and read every review I could find and the bigger options just seemed like a better value, especially when so many people just use a 7X as a stepping stone.

    I read every review and comparison I can and watched many videos, loving Frank Hoose of Mini-Lathe.com's stuff and soaked up a bunch of his info.

    After several weeks of reading/watching, I looked at the LMS5100/5200, which seemed nice, but I didn't see the value in spending so much for a 7X machine (especially after buying a 4 jaw for it) and had nearly talked myself into the G0752 10x22 Variable Speed option from Grizzly for $1795 when I stumbled upon Precision Matthews and the 10X options after watching Frank's review of his 1228.

    The PM-1022V and 1030V seem like the best value, spec wise for a new machine that I can find, especially the 1030v.
    It has:
    8" more length than the G0752
    includes a QCTP
    and the power cross feed alone is worth the $200 upgrade.
    A lower minimum rpm (50 vs 100) is nice as well.
    In fact, the only thing I can find that seems to be a "downgrade" from the G0752 is a smaller 4 jaw on the PM (6.5" vs 5"), but 5" is still way nicer than the 3" or 4" on the 7x options, AND the PM was basically quick change chuck, something I know would have annoyed me on the 7x lathes after seeing how tight the clearance was on those bolts.

    I'd love to jump again to the 1127 or 1228, but I'm already at $2500 tooled up for the 1030 after telling my wife "oh, around $1000", but that was a month ago when I figured starting with a cheap one would be fine. Jumping another $1k to go to the 1127 and 1228 would be pushing it, and I'd rather use that money towards a mill.

    Ok, so PM-1030V as a good starter lathe that won't be outgrown within the first year or two? Maybe even put a CNC conversion on it down the road?

    Is it worth almost double the money of an LMS 5100 for some 1.5" and under turning?


    My plan was to put whatever I get on something like this:
    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Milwaukee-52-in-11-Drawer-Mobile-Workcenter-48-22-8552/300891919
    That would match my tool chest and give ample storage for tooling, accessories, and some of the other tools I own without a home. I'd consider replacing or adding a steel plate to the top for additional rigidity if needed.
     
  2. richl

    richl United States Active User Active Member

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    Allow yourself room for tooling, ie toolholders, cutting tools, dial gauges, mag bases, oils, brushes... even a very basic setup will add a good deal of money to your budget. If you are stretched now and pushing for the biggest, features, price/power ratio... you might be hurting yourself from doing anything.

    I got a lathe for free some years back, my first, I had no money so it was a perfect fit... But I could not afford basic tooling so I really could not do anything, and the stuff I was finding on eBay and other cheap sources was junk... It took over 1 year of frustration before I slowly built up a decent set of tooling to use the lathe for anything of value... thank God for the mill:D:confused:
    I don't know if that will pertain to you or not. I hope you find the best lathe in your price budget, it's a great hobby!!!

    Hth
    Rich
     
  3. pstemari

    pstemari H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Some general thoughts:

    I was able to do a lot with a Taig micro lathe. It's a well-build machine and can handle just about anything that fits inside its work envelope.

    Unfortunately, it spoiled me to a certain extent and when I got an Atlas/Craftsman 12", I was really disappointed in the performance of the machine. I would up getting an ERL-1340 from Matt, and it's an outstanding machine and a joy to work with.

    So, I would look for quality (fit, tightness) first and rigidity a close second. I think both PM and LMS are good dealers and would steer you to a good machine.

    Getting a used Logan might also be an option. Logan is still in business and can supply posts. South Bends tend to price high and Grizzly, who bought the brand name, doesn't manufacture anything for the old US-made machines.

    Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
     
  4. Eddyde

    Eddyde Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    The PM1030V looks like a very nice lathe 1" bore, power cross feed, threading, included AxA tool post... You can't go wrong with that for a starter lathe!
     
  5. ttabbal

    ttabbal United States Iron Registered Member

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    I'm looking at one as well, for similar reasons. I was planning to also pick up some basic tooling and a DRO from PM with the lathe. I'd like to see some thoughts on tooling to pick up, and possibly avoid. My current thoughts are..

    From PM with the lathe..

    Lathe stand
    1/32-1/2 High Precision Keyless Drill Chuck, For Tailstock, with MT2 Shank
    AXA Master Turning/Boring Tool Set
    1/2 Internal/External Threading Tool Set
    DRO - self install
    Maybe some extra tool holders for the QTCP


    From elsewhere...

    Parting tool, doesn't seem the kits above come with one
    A couple dial gauges and mag bases
    Center drills
    Cutting oil
    Marking fluid
    HSS tool blanks


    I already have a couple micrometers, and other misc tools like drill bit sets that should be useful.
     
  6. jung4g

    jung4g United States Iron Registered Member

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    Thanks for the replies. Yeah, I'm well aware of the tooling needs to get going.

    My plan was to buy the same AXA Master Turning/Boring Tool Set and Chuck mentioned above to start. I already own dial indicator with magnetic base, drills, micrometer, caliper, etc. Beyond that, I'd need a parting tool, but I'm fine getting more tools and gauges as I go, just need to make the initial plunge.

    For ttabbal and myself, looking to get into this. Are the carbide tool bits in the turning/thread kits from PM worth jumping into right away?
    Threading: http://www.precisionmatthews.com/shop/12-internalexternal-threading-tool-set/
    Turning/Boring: http://www.precisionmatthews.com/sh...ool-set-sized-for-axa-quick-change-tool-post/

    The DRO thing seems more and more intriguing as I look into it. But that could be an addition down the road, maybe after I get a mill.
     
  7. richl

    richl United States Active User Active Member

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    Personal experience, dro on the lathe is not that important, I fell into that one also. It works, and can have some nice input, but the dials work better for me right now. Get it down the road unless they offer it in a package and the price is too good.

    The ccmt and toolholders on a 1440 lathe have been a nice investment, not sure if they would be that much of a help to you on a smaller lathe.

    The threading ones may be worth it though... I'd wait for someone with first hand experience. Ar Warner has nice hss inserts that fit into the holders, so if you are not looking to grind your own bits, that might be a nice feature.

    If you do go with pm tooling, the full kit might not be the best investment, the 90 kit gives the right hand and left hand bits and some boring bars. That might be enough for you...


    As always, ymmv
    Hth
    Rich
     
  8. Uglydog

    Uglydog United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Jung4g,
    It's not my intent to degrade PM or Grizzlys, etc. However, I've got a clean tricked out 1947 10" Powermatic / Logan with a rebuilt headstock which I could price right.
    NW Hennepin County.

    Regardless, let me know if there is something with which you'd like a assist.

    Daryl
    MN
     
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  9. richl

    richl United States Active User Active Member

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    Sounds like something to look into:grin:

    Rich
     
  10. Eddyde

    Eddyde Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Carbide insert tooling is great and those sets look fine to start. However, you may also consider learning to use High Speed Steel tools, as well. They are much cheaper, resharpenable, give excellent surface finishes and can be ground into any shape of tool you need. It's really not that hard to learn and the only additional machine you need is a common bench grinder.

    Waiting on the DRO is a good strategy. IMHO it is better to learn the machine without it, then add it once you have mastered the dials, that way you will throughly know your machine and appreciate the added features of the DRO.
     
  11. mikey

    mikey Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Every time I see one of these threads I feel excited for the OP - first lathe, wow!

    You can certainly get lost or carried away with feature creep because for a few hundred more, look what I can get ... However, what should really guide you is what you intend to do with the lathe. Some of us work on cars and want to be able to make an axle or re-work a transmission shaft; we may need a 1340. Others simply want to make model engines or common stuff that the average homeowner might need; a 7X might be okay. At the end of the day, the machine you choose should meet your needs and not what you might someday want to make because that day may never come. If a 10" lathe will do it for you for the foreseeable future then you should consider it.

    With that said, look at the differences between the 10" and under class of Asian lathes and the 11"+ lathes. On the larger ones, you will typically see wider beds (= greater rigidity), separate drive rod for longitudinal feeds (this means you aren't using and wearing your leadscrew to drive the saddle), and oftentimes a real camlock chuck mount so you can use any camlock chuck of the appropriate size (unlike the 3-bolt system on smaller lathes). Power cross feed is a standard on most larger lathes, even when it isn't all that useful except for facing big stuff at low speeds so I don't put much stock in that. Most larger lathes will also have hardened spindles with ABEC 5 bearings or better, while cheaper lathes will not. Also, a larger lathe will typically have a larger spindle bore and that can be a big deal in some situations.

    The bottom line is to first look to your specific needs and buy accordingly. If your needs seem to be pushing you to a 10" lathe, carefully consider going to an 11" lathe instead (for the above reasons). It may cost more to buy that bigger lathe but it will probably last longer, be more powerful and more rigid and with a better spindle, it may also be more accurate. You will have a much wider choice of chuck options and a camlock lathe will probably have a better resale value if you decide to upgrade. If you really think that you want a lathe that will hold you for some time then a slightly larger lathe might be just the ticket.

    By the way, the larger, more rigid lathe also impacts on the tooling you use. If you have enough speed, carbide tools will work better on a larger lathe. Just something to consider.

    I just happen to own an 11" lathe with all the "good stuff" on it so I wanted to give you some input. Good luck with this.

    Mike
     
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  12. ttabbal

    ttabbal United States Iron Registered Member

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    My initial thought was the HF 7X. Then I found this place and started looking at the PM1236. After thinking on it more, I decided that while that would be nice, I can't think of anything that size I want to turn. I'd like the larger spindle bore and camlock chuck on the PM1127/1228, but for that cost I might as well pick up the 1236, particularly once I include a stand. I could mount it to my bench, but then a large chunk of my bench is not useable for other stuff, and I don't want to try moving a lathe on/off it if it's bigger than a 7X. Pretty much everything I can think of that I want to do on a lathe, I could probably do on a 7X. So the 10X is the upgrade. But I can think of a couple things that the larger, and longer lathe would be useful for. As I get into it, I may end up eating my words there, but even if I do, I expect I'll get years of good use out of it, even if I end up with a bigger machine.

    The carbide insert tooling was in part to make sure I have tools that I know will cut reasonably well to start out. So I know it's not my crap grind on an HSS blank that's the problem. And my crappy HF grinder needs some upgrades before I can accurately grind an angle. I also get some different angled holders and boring bars to work with and learn more from. The DRO is because I know how to use the dials, and I don't want to. :) Simply put, it will make machining more fun as a hobby for me to not have to deal with it. Same reason I want a QCTP.

    I've been watching local classifieds and such for used gear. But anything that looks to be in decent shape is more expensive, and often doesn't include much for tooling. Even the stock accessory pack from PM includes more. And I'd have warranty support with PM. I'm not really qualified to detect issues in an older machine outside of the obvious. And as I have no other machine tools, fixing issues could be difficult and costly. At the moment, I want to work on some projects, make chips, etc.. I want to use a lathe, not fix a lathe.
     
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  13. mikey

    mikey Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    TT, I totally understand everything you're saying. Again, go for a lathe that will suit your needs. I simply wanted to make you guys aware that there is a difference in the builds of these machines and that there are features on the larger lathes that are important to recognize.

    The lathe is, in my opinion, the best teacher for a metal worker. Even a small lathe will teach you a lot and everything you learn on a small lathe will transfer over to a larger one if you ever go that way. Buy what you need and can afford and move on if the need arises.

    By the way, I agree that carbide tooling will get you cutting quickly. However, on a small lathe, HSS will typically outperform carbide on a small lathe so bear that in mind.

    Good luck to you guys!
     
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  14. jung4g

    jung4g United States Iron Registered Member

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    If anything, having a helpful, quick to respond community like this is super encouraging as I know I'll have more questions along the way. Thanks for all of the advise so far, and I'm glad seeing TT in basically the same situation, hopefully this thread can be of use to more people down the road.

    Mikey, can you explain why that is? Is it related to the lower surface speed related to the smaller stock used on smaller machines? Or something else I've not yet learned about?
     
  15. mikey

    mikey Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Hmm, this is a more involved answer that it might seem. Next thing you know, the guys are going to come in with the "... yeah, but ...". Still, I'll try to give you the basic reasons I said what I said but bear in mind that this is my opinion.

    Okay, there are three general classes of tooling used on a lathe: inserted carbide, brazed carbide and HSS and it's variants. All three work on any lathe but there are significant differences between them.

    Inserted carbide is nice because when a tip wears/breaks/builds up an edge then you just flip the insert to a new tip and go on cutting. The problem with inserted carbide is that it requires adequate cutting speeds that many lathes cannot achieve; accordingly, the insert does not cut as intended. Moreover, the edges of a carbide insert are often radiused so they are not really sharp. Of course, there are some ground inserts with pretty sharp edges (like the AK inserts for aluminum) but most of them are not really sharp and this increases cutting forces. In addition, most inserts have a chip breaker that requires a minimum depth of cut to work properly. Many small lathes are not rigid enough to take a heavy depth of cut; they chatter. So, you can't go fast enough and you can't go deep enough. Then there is the nose radius to contend with. In order for the insert to cut properly, the cut has to be deep enough to fully engage the nose radius of the cutter when roughing and at least a third to a half the nose radius when finishing. If you don't account for the nose radius then deflection becomes a real issue. This is a HUGE discussion all by itself and I've only touched on a few points. Just know that on a small lathe that makes small parts, speed and the lack of rigidity are going to be the limiting factors. These tools work; they are the industry standard for good reason. However, most hobby guys are not using industrial lathes that work at the speeds these inserts need. If you plan to work on big parts then maybe you can get into the right speed range but then you'd need a bigger, faster lathe, right? The bottom line is that inserted carbide works on smaller lathes. Will it work as intended? No, it won't. Are there better options? Yes, there are.

    Brazed carbide is good stuff. It holds an edge really well, can handle deep cuts and high heat and it can be sharpened in the home shop. The issue I have with brazed carbide is that these tools generally have no rake angles and this greatly increases cutting forces. Next to HSS, however, I think this is one of the best tools for a hobby class lathe.

    HSS is cheap, easy to grind and when ground properly, will cut with lower cutting forces than the other two. When ground properly, they have excellent edge retention and requires a few seconds of occasional honing to retain that edge for decades. Because of their sharp edges, these tools cut with the least deflection of all the tooling options and they will cut at low, medium and high speeds. They can be ground to greatly reduce cutting forces and this allows them to be used quite effectively on smaller, less rigid, less powerful lathes. The caveat is that the effectiveness of a HSS tool is dependent on how the tool is ground; a good HSS tool is not good simply because it is made of HSS but that is another discussion. Also keep in mind that no HSS tool will cut everything equally well. Each material you work with will have an optimal tip geometry and you need to be able to grind that geometry if the tool is to work well. Fortunately, this is not hard to do.

    I put some thought into it and if I was a new guy just starting off, I would buy some HSS CCMT inserts from AR Warner and either their SCLCR tool holders or maybe a decent tool holder on ebay. That would get me cutting. I would also buy some carbide CCMT and CCGT inserts (do your homework on these) off ebay and give them a try, too. This is just to get you cutting on your new lathe and to give you the chance to compare inserts. I would also buy at least one brazed right hand carbide tool from Micro 100 so you know what the best brazed carbide tool cuts like. Then, when you can, learn to grind HSS tooling and do a head to head comparison for yourself.

    One of my lathes is a little Sherline lathe. It will easily take a 0.050" to 0.060" deep cut in mild steel with a general purpose HSS tool, and then it will take a 0.0005" deep cut and actually cut it accurately. Try that with a carbide insert on a lathe this size and then you'll see why I think HSS is the best option on a small lathe.
     
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  16. jung4g

    jung4g United States Iron Registered Member

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    Wow, that helps a lot. Thank you, Mikey.
    It all makes a lot of sense explained that way. I really just thought it was a cost thing or custom profiled tools that pushed home guys to use HSS.

    The idea of inserts is still intriguing to keep things going without stopping to sharpen (also an annoyance of mine with TIG welding after dipping the tungsten in the puddle), and I justed stumbled on this: HSS Tooling Kit
    Expensive, but I like the concept.

    Also, I am drooling over the PM-1127, but really don't think I need the up size, especially if it means waiting another 6 months or more to make it happen.
     
  17. T Bredehoft

    T Bredehoft Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I don't think this has been mentioned, but the majority (I dont' know about that from PM) of cemented carbide tooling is not ready to cut. Out of the box it doesn't have enough relief, and should be dressed on a diamond wheel.
    I don't think anyone will contradict me on this, learn to turn with High Speed Steel tools, once you're good with HSS and your lathe will handle carbide, try it out, but go for inserts not cemented, you get FAR better quality tools that way.
     
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  18. mksj

    mksj Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    It is always a tough decision price vs. perceived need and what you plan to do with your lathe. But the two aspects that I believe are a very big step up in this price range, is the D1-4 spindle mount and the 1.5" bore. These make a significant difference in availability of chucks and the size of the work your machine can handle. I wish my 1340GT had a 2" spindle bore, but I get by just fine with the 1.5", anything smaller would be a real hassle. But it all depends on what you plan to do with the lathe and the price point. If you are just making pens or smalls, then a larger spindle bore would be pointless.

    I also concur with Mikey on the use of inserts on a smaller lathe, but there are many factors which should not deter one from at least trying carbide inserts. As he mentioned there are some very sharp carbide (ground edge) inserts with a highly positive cutting edge, I can routinely cut a 0.005" depth of cut in different materials and it peels away the metal like fine steel wool. The other day I was machining some bike bushings to very specific tolerances and was able to cut in very small increments to the desired press fit. I use BXA holders with 5/8" or 3/4" insert holders, the 1340GT has good rigidity and they work well, but on a larger heavier machine and in industrial settings is where the insert technology really make a difference. Myself, I just do not have the setup or inclination to grind my own HSS tooling, but there may be a few exceptions. You can quickly get lost with all the different types of insert/holders, but once you start using them it hopefully will become clearer. The CCMT/CCGT is a great starting point, insert size would be something in the 21.50, 21.51 or 21.52 for an AXA setup tool post holder. I guess I am new school on using insert technology, just with an old mind to lazy for grinding my own HSS cutter for the lathe.
     
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  19. mikey

    mikey Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Please don't get me wrong. Inserted tools are very likely the most commonly used tools in a hobby shop. They work, its easy to change inserts so you can get on with it and you can get used to the way the inserts cut fairly easily. Moreover, once you know how the insert cuts, it will cut that way consistently until the insert wears or is damaged. As long as you recognize that the nose radius must be accommodated and plan your cuts well then you can use inserted carbide tools quite well, as mksj noted above. I just wanted you to understand that carbide tools work best on larger, more rigid, faster lathes, and that for smaller lathes, there are other options that may work better for you if you choose to go that route.

    Only you can decide which lathe you will buy. There are features that are highly desirable (camlock chuck, hardened this or that, etc) but you can certainly live with less. Choose based on your needs and you should do okay. Besides, you can always upgrade if your needs change, right?

    Regardless, give HSS tools a try. You just might be surprised at how well they work.
     
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  20. navav2002

    navav2002 United States Iron Registered Member

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    Last edited: Aug 24, 2017
  21. mikey

    mikey Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    jung4g, I forgot to mention the Brownell tool set you linked to. That is a 1/4" set, which is a bit small. Have a look at the AR Warner 3/8" set here: http://www.arwarnerco.com/p-12-kit-8-38-inch-turning-c-right-hand-left-hand-and-boring-bar.aspx

    It has a RH, LH and boring bar for a not-too-bad price. These use CCMW HSS flat-topped inserts, which I presume is the T-15 HSS version of a 80 degree diamond insert. The same tools will accept carbide CCMT and CCGT in the 21.51 or 21.52 sizes. Note that the CCMW has no chip breaker and I'm pretty sure they're ground so they should be sharp. If they are like the typical AR Warner HSS inserts, you should be able to sharpen them by honing their tops on a diamond stone; just don't wait until the insert is really beat up.

    These tools will face and turn without you having to reposition your tool post. The LH bar is double-ended and allows you to use the un-used corners of an insert, for whatever that is worth.

    The boring bar is the typical SCLCR configuration and will take the same CCMT/CCGT inserts that the turning tools take. It is a 3/8" steel bar; contact ARW to see what the minimum bore size is that will accept this bar. Maximum extension will be about 1.5" deep.
     
  22. Tozguy

    Tozguy Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    jung, I hope your shopping for a lathe is going well, it kinda makes shopping for a car look easy eh.

    Re carbide inserts or brazed tools, my experience has been that they are costly for a beginner because they chip so easily and are expensive to replace. On the other hand grinding your own HSS can be daunting for a beginner. One compromise is this product.
    http://www.eccentricengineering.com.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2&Itemid
    It can use HSS, HSS Co, Crobalt and solid carbide bits in a relatively inexpensive size (1/4'') and grinding is much easier.
    Once you discover the versatility of this tool it will be obvious how well suited it is to general hobbyist work.

    It does not do everything (like threading and boring) but it certainly has been a pleasure to use for me.

    I started with brazed carbide but it was a revelation to me after a few years of hobby work, how much better HSS and HSS Co is adapted to my needs. I would even say it out performs carbide in most cases. Grinding our own tools (whether HSS or carbide) allows us to appreciate just how much the right profile and sharpness of a tool contributes to enjoyment.
     
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  23. Ironken

    Ironken United States Active Member Active Member

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    I have the 1030 and really like it. I shoulda waited and went bigger buuuuut.........you know how the budget deal goes.

    As for the master turning and boring set, I own that as well. They are nice. To me, the oddball holders that are supposed to allow you to use the otherwise unused edges of the inserts are useless. The boring bars are useful as are the included inserts for soft metals. I found the CCMT inserts to be a bit weak. FYI AR Warner makes HSS inserts that will fit these holders.

    I also have a PM keyless drill chuck and love it.
     
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  24. jung4g

    jung4g United States Iron Registered Member

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    Quick update on this journey.
    You've heard the stories about people that are open to mentioning to just about everyone what they're looking for, even just casually? Something like "I've been looking for a lathe for the garage shop"...

    Years ago, I mentioned that to my now late uncle who had a full machine shop in his basement for restoring cars (think Stanley Steamers) and his immediate response was "Shoot! I wish you would have said that two weeks ago, a good buddy of mine just moved and gave his away". I've been slightly ill over that ever since. Fast forward since then (and 3 kids showing up to steal my time) and this go around I've been more vocal about wanting to get one.

    Well my mom called the other day after visiting my aunt, now the owner of the old machining tools and she says "I told her you just ordered a lathe and she was just sick that you didn't call her first to ask about your uncle's old tools". My response was that I was hoping to actually order later that day and that I hadn't yet, but that last I knew my cousin was planning to take everything.

    Fast forward to now and I'm going to visit this weekend to take inventory. Turns out my cousin already came and claimed everything he needed/wanted and that she's willing to let me come take the lathe AND the mill and all accessories. Basically I'm in charge of actually moving them, but she'll give me everything. She's just happy to know someone in the family actually wants them.

    I didn't know much about the machines a few years ago before my uncle passed to remember anything beyond they're pretty big machines. She's under the impression that the mill alone is over 2000lbs.

    Knowing my uncle, this shop was used daily for decades, and he didn't buy junk, so I'm excited to go check it out.

    Honestly, while I kind of wanted new, modern equipment, I'm monetarily a ways away from being able to do CNC conversions on a mini-mill AND lathe, so getting these for free complete with his collection of tooling is really ideal to get started even if it's not cheap to have them moved the 17 miles to my house.

    I'll post more when I have info on the machines.
     
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  25. richl

    richl United States Active User Active Member

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    It's going to be hard getting sympathy from us when you were given a full machine shop, and your only expense is moving it 17 miles :big grin:.
    2 of my machines I had to drive 3 hours each way for, rent a truck, load myself and unload... Than fix the machines

    Awesome deal for you, I hope everything works out well and you are having fun in no time!!!:angel:

    Rich
     
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  26. .LMS.

    .LMS. United States Lathe Noob H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Nothing like tools that belonged to a relative. Mine like that are special to me. Hope you do what it takes to restore them to their majesty.
     
  27. ttabbal

    ttabbal United States Iron Registered Member

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    Well, I'm super jealous! Make sure to post pics for us unlucky types!
     
  28. Eddyde

    Eddyde Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Wow, What a terrific turn of events, Enjoy your good fortune!
     
  29. jung4g

    jung4g United States Iron Registered Member

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    Ok, took a first look at them today. Had my 6 week old with and a cousin had stopped by to visit, so I didn't get too much time to dig around and take measurements. But I snapped a few pics where I could.

    Mill is a Clausing Atlas
    Any model number plate seemed to be missing. Or I wasn't looking in the right spot.
    Things look well used, but the action was incredibly smooth and tight compared to the few examples I've seen.

    I'll try to search around to figure out the model, but the bed wasn't huge, maybe just 20 or 24" wide... 110v motor.

    Lathe is an Enco 110-2035 made (in China, oh well) in 1989.
    He had at least 4 chucks and 2 faceplates, a steady rest, and some quick change tool mounts around. Plus many boxes of parts and accessories like collets and the like. My cousin had already moved some stuff to his shop, so he said to swing out and sort through it all to take whatever I need.
    I can't find anything on that model online, but I'm guessing about a 12x36?
    Spindle bore was well over an inch, maybe 1 3/8" or so.

    If anyone has info on them, I'd be grateful! I'll probably start new theads for each to find out more.
     

    Attached Files:

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  30. mikey

    mikey Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Man, I would be so grateful to receive those machines, especially because of their special connection. Congrats, Jung4g!
     
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