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Lathe grease gun advice

Discussion in 'GRIZZLY INDUSTRIAL INC.' started by Tanshanomi, Apr 7, 2017.

  1. Tanshanomi

    Tanshanomi United States Active Member Active Member

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    Cast alloy parts with tri-chrome decorative plating. The delivered defect rate from our US supplier was around 1 in 200, and they said repeatedly that was as good as they could get. We currently get about 1 defective part in 1000 from our supplier in Taiwan. I am not on the manufacturing or procurement side so I don't know the details, but I suspect they manufacture just as many defects; I think they simply are simply willing do a more thorough final inspection and eat more scrap.
     
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  2. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I totally agree, I refuse to be politically correct, and as an Aussie it's not in my nature. I've never had anything to do with a Southbend, but I understand they were a quality product. I've also never had anything to do with a Grizzly product, but from the comments I've read, I'm rather glad.. I Can only admire all the dedicated owners who have had to virtually rebuild their new machines to finally get a decent product.
     
  3. fitterman1

    fitterman1 Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Welcome Bob, just noticed we're in the same neighbourhood, The Southbends have been in this country for many years. In fact if you did metalwork at school there's a good chance you learnt on either a Southbend or a Hercus (and a Hercus is actually a Southbend copy). Since Hercus closed shop its a case of buy asian or fork out the dollars for the good stuff. I own a Workman 250 x 550 (aka Grizzly G0602) see them in Paramount browns under their brand name or get them from Ozmestore on ebay (based at Pt Adelaide). I've hacked the daylights out of mine and still haven't finished. Been having a spell lately, but its a lot better than when I first got it. You'll find it here on this site detailing some of what I've done to it. There's a lot of guys here with the same unit and others. Love reading about their tribulations too. Been a very interesting journey.
    regards Alby
     
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  4. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    G'day Alby,
    We have actually spoken indirectly on this forum before, During my apprenticeship I only recall using Colchester lathes, the proper English made ones, at trade school, they may have had Southbends, I don't recall. We did have a small Hercus at the factory, but mostly larger machines, I spent a lot of time on a Macson with a 14" 4 jaw and 8" 3 jaw plus all the regular stuff. the bed was about 4ft long. top speed was 350 RPM. driven by a 15hp motor

    The only carbide tools we had were flat rectangular bits of carbide silver soldered to steel shanks and hand ground. Almost all of our machines were produced before or during WW2 many of them having "wartime finish" on their name plates. No DRO's or CNC then. I still have my original Moore & Write 1" micrometer, my parents bought me for my birthday a few weeks after starting the apprenticeship in 1961. I still have a few boxes of HSS tool bits from then and various special tools that I made over the years like a step drill for drilling counter bores for SHCS


    I was in the happy position of being able to afford a decent Taiwanese lathe when I decided the time had come. I did look at all the offerings of the firms you mentioned plus a few others but they just didn't do it for me, and I decided that I wasn't going to spend my few remaining years rebuilding some else's sloppy work, I've been doing that all my life, but at least I got paid for it.

    What part of Adelaide you in? I'm at Eden Hills.

    Cheers Bob.
     
  5. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    They can afford too, there wages are so low, and they have a very high pride in the quality of their products.
     
  6. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    An interesting fact, Australia with our high wages, average 50% higher than US, we still produce the cast alloy wheels for Harley Davidson motorcycles. they have tried every where else but no one else can deliver the quality.
     
  7. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I tend to agree, Headstock oil as spec. ditto feed box and saddle. I use whatever oil is handy on the bed ways, usually just plain SAE 30. The change gears I use chain saw bar oil, runs the quietest of every thing I've tried and it stays put. not as messy as grease Just a few drops on the top most gear when its running and soon it's all done.
     
  8. fitterman1

    fitterman1 Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Hi Bob, I'm at Para Vista near TTP.
    I think in your quote above that when Tanshanomi mentions "Cast Alloy parts", he's not talking about our Castalloy foundry here in Adelaide.
    I think he's generalising about something or place maybe closer to him in the U.S.
    Don't ROH use Castalloy as a subcontractor for those Harley wheels? I'm not sure now.
    Anyway hello from me.
    cheers Alby
     
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  9. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Yes I realise he was not talking about the Castalloy here in Adelaide, which incidentally has been bought by HD, well at least the wheel division has been, and they've called something else. A mate of mine works there has done for years, spends most of his time in US. Must be due for retirement soon. BTW as far as I know it's not connected with ROH wheels.
     
  10. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Alby what's it like up on top of those wind turbine towers, not sure if I'd be happy up there.
     
  11. fitterman1

    fitterman1 Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Ok, thanks for clarifying that.
    Mate of mine is a boilermaker, bought an old Macson back in 2007. Only needed it for turning large flanges for water pipework. Chuck is about 900mm in diameter and bed is about 3m between centers. Gap bed also, Old and worn, the shears taper because feeding in to the chuck I can get a great finish, If I reverse feed on the fly the carriage rocks over and starts taking another cut outwards. No amount of adjustment would minimise this as feeding out would progressively tighten the adjusting pads against the shears and you would start to hear the motor load up through the gear train. No more out feeding on that one. Max speed 300rpm, min speed 7rpm. Weighs about 8 tons and the biggest flange I've turned on it was 1400mm x 85mm thick. 10" square toolpost on it too. Very solid machine.
     
  12. fitterman1

    fitterman1 Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Best job I've ever had, best people to work with also, locals and internationals. Very good work, lots of variety. I ran the 500hr servicing at Snowtown stage 1, North Brown Hill and also The Bluff. As well as genny changeouts and some gearbox repairs. I trained a number of locals to become technicians.
    You'd love it up there, its a fitters dream. Aligning the genny to gearbox, yaw drives to gearrim backlash, hydraulic torquing of any bolt from 30mm dia up in the nacelle and all the way down the tower, cleaning was messy at times. Stop and start the turbine using a laptop, testing of limit switches using same, filling greasers, diagnosing and repairing faults both mechanical and electrical. There must have been a hundred jobs done in them during service for a crew of say 4 guys to be done inside of three days.
    Really the best work I have ever done, for the best money ever earnt. Hardest part of the day was climbing in the morning, but once up there thats where you stayed for the rest of the day. You trained your arse to **** before climbing or risked a second climb. I climbed for 2 yrs at Snowtown (500hr service and 4 x 6 mth services) and then was shifted to North Brown Hill which from that point on all farms had to be fitted out with elevators as well as ladders, but the elevators made your day. Most number of manual climbs in one day was 3 for 9 days straight fitting out noise reduction units at Hallett Hill windfarm, my last site. Cold in winter but you had a warm gearbox to sit on and suck up some warmth. Hot in summer but if a breeze was blowing it wasn't too bad up there. You're 85 meters off the ground, or more in the larger units, great sense of freedom up there whilst working, harnessed while climbing or descending or going out to the hub or roof for maintenance.
    Best job I've ever had.
     
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  13. bobshobby

    bobshobby Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Glad you like it, but at 73 with a bung hip it wouldn't suit me. I've done a few things, but most of my working life I was a marine engineer. Great pay, but terrible hours, away from home 3 -4 months at a time. My last 10 years I was on the second largest ship ever to fly the Aussie flag. A super tanker carrying 136,000 t crude oil. Ended up as 1st engineer for the last two years. Most of the time from middle east to Sydney and Geelong. Sometimes we went to other places like China, Korea, NZ, USA , Singapore, Indonesia and Hawaii.
    Don't tell me about torquing up big bolts Ever seen the size of the bolts on the cylinder heads of a big marine diesel engine., or the con rod big end, and main bearing caps, you need a crane to lift the spanner.
     

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