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Lathe grease gun advice

Discussion in 'GRIZZLY INDUSTRIAL INC.' started by Tanshanomi, Apr 7, 2017.

  1. Tanshanomi

    Tanshanomi United States Active Member Active Member

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    I have had a Grizzly South Bend 8K for a while now, and I have yet to find a decent procedure for lubing it. I have no problem oiling the spindle bearings, but greasing the other zerks is a royal bumblecluster. The cheap, plastic push-feed grease applicator I got with the lathe was lousy when new, quickly become absolutely useless, and eventually went in the trash. I've tried two different pump guns, but they have the bigger, automotive-style locking tips that are a supreme hassle to attach. Furthermore, they grip the zerks so firmly that while trying to remove it from the right-side leadscrew bushing, I accidentally pulled the fitting completely out of the housing. I frankly spend as much of my time greasing the gears and shafts and then cleaning excess grease off the lathe, my bench, the gun, and my hands as I do cutting metal. Does anybody have any recommendations to streamline greasing and oiling my lathe? How do all you other people do this?
     
  2. fitterman1

    fitterman1 Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I don't grease any part of my lathe (g0602) except the spindle bearings. Everything is oiled with either an iso32 hydraulic oil or mobil shc320 for the gearbox.
    Just because your machine has zerks doesn't mean you must put grease in them.
    I'm not familiar with your machine, but does the manual state grease?
    There are small one handed pumps made specifically for oil or grease that used to be used for this job.
    This is what I use, the little handpump also works on grease nipples without latching on.

    Oiler and greaser.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2017
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  3. Rustrp

    Rustrp United States Active Member Active Member

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    I'll second: Are there that many grease zerks on this lathe? They do make the quick release tips that help a lot. I know when you get the tip angled off a little it presents a challenge pulling the grease gun free.
     
  4. Bob Korves

    Bob Korves H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    The outside collar on a grease gun coupler is usually adjustable by screwing it in and out to change how tightly it grips the grease fitting.
     
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  5. Tanshanomi

    Tanshanomi United States Active Member Active Member

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    Per the manual: "Spindle Bearings - Oil Type Mobil DTE Light or ISO 32 Equivalent" / "Gears - Grease Type NLGI#2"
    "There are 10 grease fittings on the Model SB1001that require daily lubrication with the included grease gun."
     
  6. fitterman1

    fitterman1 Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    If that's what the manual specifies then so be it. I hate using grease on a lathe, it creates more work for me and collects a lot of swarf and crud.
    Also it has a higher friction factor than if straight oil is used. Just my preference.
     
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  7. Bob Korves

    Bob Korves H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    NLGI2 grease works great for lathe gears. First, clean up the gears. Get yourself an old toothbrush, dip it lightly in the grease, and dab it lightly only on the curved parts of the teeth that actually touch each other. That is the only part that needs to be lubed. Spin them around so the grease gets distributed evenly, and then wipe off all the grease on the faces of the gears and the excess on the tips of the teeth. You should only have a light wet film on the rubbing parts of the teeth, and nothing else. You are now done. It will not make a mess, and it will last a long time. So will your container of grease. The inside of the gear cover will stay clean. If you do not have a gear cover, then do not lube them at all, or, better yet, make or procure a cover!
     
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  8. rwm

    rwm Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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  9. Silverbullet

    Silverbullet Active Member Active Member

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    As far as I know , no lathe uses grease on the ways or shaft bearings. The push pump oil and grease type can be found in metal , there used in small engines, chainsaw bars specifically. They have a round thumb button. The fitting can be reused from the plastic pump model. I'd be very Leary of ever buying a lathe with grease on the ways or shafts. The only grease used on the gears only. If your gears are coated with a tacky grease it will last for months if not fouled with chips or cutting fluids.
     
  10. Tanshanomi

    Tanshanomi United States Active Member Active Member

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    Just to clarify, here's the manual page showing the grease locations I'm talking about — not leadscrew threads, ways, spindle bearings or gear teeth.

    SB1001-greasefittings.jpg
     
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  11. Tanshanomi

    Tanshanomi United States Active Member Active Member

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    Thanks for the recommendation. I found this one on Ebay that's designed to lube motorcycle swingarm bushings. Once I receive it, I'll report back on how well it works.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Rustrp

    Rustrp United States Active Member Active Member

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    I think this has been narrowed down to the device used for the grease application. There's really no big secrets to operating a grease gun with or without an adjustable tip and the only thing left out of many instructions is to wipe/clean the zerk before the application. You stated earlier that you pulled a zerk when attempting to pull/disconnect the grease gun, and this seems to be a poorly fitted zerk. Whatever the pump design of the gun the zerks are designed for a straight on or off action in line with the zerk axis. Of course xerks are manufactured to several different angles to fit the application.

    The application rates of two pumps daily seems to be a lot to me, and that's from the standpoint of tramp grease ending up on and in the oil lubricating the gear teeth. When you pump and the grease comes out when or where you can see it try to clean it off to prevent contamination. In the past these lube points were designed for oil but inserting a zerk is less expensive and the grease that fits the application is readily available. The engineering and designs manufactured into the original machinery are often lost in the manufacturing processes offshore.

    Edit: After reading a couple of posts and looking at the owners manual instructions again I saw geared pulleys and belts, with the help of stronger readers. :foot in mouth:
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2017
  13. Silverbullet

    Silverbullet Active Member Active Member

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    Well now that's the first lathe I've seen that does take grease. No exposed gears but belts with cogs. But the grease gun I was talking about is almost like the one you have pictured. Live and learn.
     
  14. Rustrp

    Rustrp United States Active Member Active Member

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    I had to step up and put my 1.75 readers on after reading your post. I was seeing gears not belts and pulleys.
     
  15. Tanshanomi

    Tanshanomi United States Active Member Active Member

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    It seems Grizzly did just about everything unconventionally on the 8K. Which is not a complaint, it's a hell of a machine for what I paid...it's just a weird mix of specs!
     
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  16. fitterman1

    fitterman1 Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I'm not a local but I see South Bend written on this lathe. Am I missing something? Who is the manufacturer of Tanshanomi's lathe?
    Don't worry, I went back up to the first post and saw "I have had a Grizzly South Bend 8K for a while now".
    Does Grizzly have permission to use the South Bend name?

    Also to Tanshanomi, that little grease pump I pictured, has a concave face at the contact end for the nipple to seat into. No latching. If you have to you might need to machine one into yours.
     
  17. rwm

    rwm Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I have the SB 1002. The grease points are almost identical but most of mine call for oil and have ball oilers. I think for these relatively low speed bearings as long as they are lubricated with something they will do fine. The spindle and the change gears on mine take grease. Also note that the "2 pumps of grease per day" assumes you are running the lathe for 8 hours. If you use your lathe intermittently like I do you will use way less grease.
    Robert
     
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  18. Tanshanomi

    Tanshanomi United States Active Member Active Member

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    Grizzly bought the South Bend name after the old SB company folded.
     
  19. fitterman1

    fitterman1 Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I think it shameful when the founding company has to sell out to another, and the new company uses the original name on its own products. It doesn't seem right that a once proud name is now attached to second rate products.
    Am I allowed to say this, or is this turning political?
     
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  20. Rustrp

    Rustrp United States Active Member Active Member

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    We have always lived in a global economy, and we never (almost always) get a say in what the buyer does with our product. I think if the same effort was applied to producing a quality product as the original South Bend, you or I wouldn't have a problem with it. The first issue with the low quality product (import machine tools) are the lack of controls in the alloys, from the cast iron castings, the steel or the brass/bronze that's used. The only chance of getting a product that has some quality built in is due to CNC machinery, not the machine operators. The political bent if there is one, is listening to someone trying to convince you the cake they baked is really good for you, go ahead and taste it. Reality is, it's empty calories. We should probably leave it at that because attempting to convince someone to go on a diet is a touchy subject.
     
  21. Tanshanomi

    Tanshanomi United States Active Member Active Member

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    No way would I characterize new SB stuff as "second rate." It's good quality stuff, better than machines sold under Grizzly's regular brand. Also, to clarify, their lathes are Taiwanese, which represents a clear step-up in factory standards over mainland China. The 8K and Heavy Ten get criticized for their somewhat illogical combination of specs and components, but I haven't heard anybody who has used one complain about their accuracy or metallurgy.
     
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  22. Rustrp

    Rustrp United States Active Member Active Member

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    That's because, after twenty five years the manufacturers in Taiwan have moved their foundries and manufacturing facilities out of their kitchens. Thirty years ago they couldn't duplicate a part when they had the original casting in their hands. One of the tale-tale traits of import equipment that looks really good is the amount of plastic autobody filler used on their castings before they are painted. The problems lie with no mandated QC, but that's true anywhere.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2017
  23. Tanshanomi

    Tanshanomi United States Active Member Active Member

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    I work for a large manufacturing firm that makes about 85% of our components in the US, and gets 15% from Asia. We get a lot of the stuff we source from overseas because we can't find a US firm to make it to our level of quality. There are genuinely excellent factories and total crap factories just about everywhere nowadays, even China. On a national level, it's simply the ratio of good to bad that varies. But the days of assuming that EVERYTHING sourced from a particular country must be good or bad are over.
     
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  24. Rustrp

    Rustrp United States Active Member Active Member

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    I think you missed the point. Fitterman1 resides in Australia, I'm in California and the topic was quality which you quickly pointed out the country of origin of the current SB lathe. The point specific was a quality product that was filling a need of the war effort in WWII. South Bend was an innovation of that era and I can assure you none of the parts were outsourced or was there a need too. Tell us what 15% of the product that goes into your manufactured item must be purchased from Asia. I can't speak for anyone but I wasn't implying only quality is available here in the US, and I will default to my opening comment.

    I could give you a list of products by container load that didn't meet alloy specifications and in turn were purchased by the insurance companies who covered them. This still doesn't imply that the US has superior quality. Wherever product is outsourced, it's about cost in almost all cases, before the lack of qualified workers or craftsmanship availability comes into play. Fitterman1's comment was about 2nd 3rd generation machinists losing their jobs to 5th and 6th generation peasant farmers sons and daughters.

    When an unskilled worker become trained, they want more money for their skills. After honing those skills for 20 yrs. a person is reluctant to go back to apprentice wages. For the last 30-40 years the outsourcing of jobs to unskilled labor markets has been the norm. When that specific region becomes more skilled and the workers begin to ask for higher wages, the manufacturing moves to the the next unskilled geographic area.
     
  25. woodchucker

    woodchucker United States Active Member Active Member

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    True true, I just received a cheap angle yesterday. The voids in the casting are amazing. So pitted ... But you get what you pay for... I needed it for a job, and had no other choice.
    But turns out it was for naught anyway... I bought a SB taper attach and the grub screws are hardened apparently.. I had to drill them out before sending them to a welder to fill the holes and cracks...
    Gotta find a 5/32 carbide drill bit.
     
  26. fitterman1

    fitterman1 Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    It doesn't seem right that a once proud name is now attached to second rate products.

    I should have picked better words to use, I'm not bagging the new South Bend labelled products, or the company that sells them.
    Its obvious they are marketing a better product sourced from a more highly developed industrialized area.
    At the end of the day it's the way the global market has evolved, that irks me.
    My apologies for dragging this thread off topic.
    Now back to the lubricating topic, what has Tanshanomi done about lubing his lathe?
     
  27. Tanshanomi

    Tanshanomi United States Active Member Active Member

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    I spent $33.50 for a better-quality version of the push-type grease gun that came with it. Haven't had a chance to fill it and try it out yet, though.

    [​IMG]
     
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  28. fitterman1

    fitterman1 Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Looks like a good unit, does it have the concave end?
     
  29. Tanshanomi

    Tanshanomi United States Active Member Active Member

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    Yes, there is a concave rubber insert.
     
  30. fitterman1

    fitterman1 Australia H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Great, put it to good use, should last a lifetime.
     

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