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[Newbie] Lathe CNC - No Compound?

Discussion in 'CNC IN THE HOME SHOP' started by angelfj1, Feb 5, 2017.

  1. angelfj1

    angelfj1 United States Active User Active Member

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    I'm considering a cnc conversion of my Grizzly, G0602. I have noticed that after conversion. some folks operate the machine without a compound. Is this a common practice and what are the pros and cons.

    Thanks, Frank
     
  2. Keith Foor

    Keith Foor Active Member Active Member

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    There is no use for a compound on a CNC lathe. The controller runs both the X and Y axis. Now if you are gonna set the lathe up for manual functionality having the compound may still be a good idea. But you are gonna need to make sure that it's put in the same spot every time for use with the CNC function. The CNC controller is not going to know where the tool bit is if you move the compound and therefore the tool bit.
     
  3. bpratl

    bpratl United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I eliminated the top compound with a solid 6075 Aluminum block and made it .100" shorter for the proper setup of a AXA QCTP. Bob
     
  4. HEAVYMETAL87

    HEAVYMETAL87 United States Active Member Active Member

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    This is going to sound kinda silly- but would a rotary table with some... modification to the plate work as a ATC post on a CNC lathe?
     
  5. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

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    Don't know why not, anything is possible if you're creative enough.:)
     
  6. HEAVYMETAL87

    HEAVYMETAL87 United States Active Member Active Member

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    The only concern that I had was that the force of the piece spinning would be too much for the worm gear in the rotary table.
     
  7. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

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    You would want mechanically lock it into position once it indexed.
     
  8. bpratl

    bpratl United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Sounds good, and I would think that it could be locked with a short stroke pneumatic cylinder using gcode. Bob
     
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  9. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

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    That's the way I would do it.:encourage:
     
  10. Wreck™Wreck

    Wreck™Wreck United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    There would be no point in having a compound on a NC lathe, all tapers may be interpolated by the control.
     
  11. Glenn Goodlett

    Glenn Goodlett United States Swarf Registered Member

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    I wondered about this too. Thanks for the info.

    Would a spacer made of a block of steel be better than aluminum due to thermal expansion and rigidity or does it matter?
     
  12. T Bredehoft

    T Bredehoft Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Wouldn't think it would matter. First off, what amount of temp change would the block be subject to? Thermal expansion is figured in degree of change times a constant for the metal involved, Steel is .0000066, Aluminum is .00001 One inch thick aluminum would expand .0001 for every ten degrees of change, steel, .000066 for the same. The block of steel/aluminum on the top of the crossfeed isn't going to change all that much.
     

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