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Lathe accessories/tools. Ideas of what to buy.

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Darkbluesky

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#1
Just picked up an old colchester that was "born" the same year as myself. I'm new to machining in general so a lot of learning as I go. I've read over and over how tooling will outpace the price of the machine before you know it so I'm semi prepared, but I'm looking for a good list of things I should consider buying as a starter.

This is the lathe I'm starting with

https://imgur.com/gallery/UaPsX

Ie do I pick up a basic set of tooling off amazon so I can break it without too much worry while I learn? Ie

https://www.amazon.ca/Accusize-Inde...id=1504744078&sr=8-4&keywords=3/4"+tool+lathe




There's a 3/4" valenite carbide tool, cutoff tool and a boring bar that came with it. Accessories wise the lathe came with the steady rest and follow rest, As well as a few other bits, dial indicator, live centre, drill chuck. 1 thing missing is a 4 jaw chuck.

Hoping to get an idea of a first purchase of tools and accessories so as I get into learning the lathe I don't have to stop to order something every time I come to learning a new part of working with it (I know to some degree that can't be avoided, just looking to fill out a basics kit to start.

The tool holder looks like it rotates around so you could hold 4 tools, seems like it would be good to start with, though I see a lot on quick change toolpost setups.

What other things might I not be thinking of? Vices, other measuring tools? I'm doing as much reading as I can trying to research into this as it's a new addition to my home shop but it's so new I know I'm coming up against not knowing what questions to ask just yet.

I'm waiting on delivery so it's not quiet at my fingertips just yet, some I've left with trying to shop to be prepared fro it's arrival.

Cheers
 

kvt

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#2
I know that someone has a list of things but can not for the life of me find it. But a few things will be Micrometers, (outside and possible inside,) Calipers, 6 inch and 12 inch rule, a Dial indicator or two, mag base for it, Test indicator also comes in handy.
If you are like most of us you become a one of those people that just keeps collecting all tools, etc.
Good luck and welcome to the site.
 

killswitch505

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#3
Man it kinda depends on what you'll be doing with it mines mainly gunsmithing so an inboard and out board set of spiders, .0005 indicators, mag bases, outside 1"-3" micrometers, inside mics, depth mics, turning set like you have in 1/2" shanks a second turning set in high speed steel with half inch shanks, I really want a set in 3/8" (for tighter spaces) I've a boat load of gunsmithing reamers (crowning chambering), oh and threading tools for inside and outside threading in carbide and HSS. My most recent purchase has been a DRO I would highly recommend doing that makes the work so much more enjoyable.
 

Aukai

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#4
I just saw that list last night, Mikey was the author, if that helps.
 

killswitch505

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#5
Lathe files, Quick change tool post bunches of tool holders because constantly having to change tools sucks. Plenty of bits for that grooving tool would prolly help too I went through a few getting the swing of parting another parting tool as well
 

Darkbluesky

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#6
Thanks for the suggestions so far. I'm realizing how much catching up on part types , acronyms , and standards. Ie with me not having the lathe at my shop yet I'm trying to search for what quick change tool posts would fit my lathe and am going down the rabbit hole of tool sizes, tool holder types etc.. same thing for chucks as I search for what type of chuck I'd need to look for to make sure it would fit my lathe. I'm hoping it starts making more sense with a little more reading and having the lathe at my place. Trying to avoid buying things only to find out I got the wrong size or type.
 

Aukai

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#8
must have double clicked, damn mouse, hair trigger....
 

GoceKU

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#9
Darkbluesky, when i started for the first time, i watch couple of videos on youtube and begin buying things i've seen most commonly used, after i started machining i've seen some of the drawbacks on some tools, i started with an CNMG insert tool holder and i'm still using it for most of my turning. I would recommend that for starters.
 

mikey

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#10
That Bantam is a really nice lathe! I just spent a few minutes on the lathes.uk site and was impressed by the build of this machine. 5-1/2" (0r 6-1/2")swing, D1-3 camlock precision spindle and almost 800# - this is a very, very, very nice first lathe!

If this was my lathe, the first thing I would find is the complete change gear set. I hope the seller has it and is sending it to you. If not, start looking!

Your tool post is commonly called a 4-way tool post and it is very rigid. Unfortunately, in order to get your tools on center height you must shim each tool. You can install 4 tools at once but each one has to be shimmed. Once done, they will work just fine. Note that every time you sharpen a tool or change one, you have to re-shim the thing. This is why most of us use quick change tool posts - avoiding shimming. The 4-way is more rigid and can be very fast to use if you install the right tools but eventually, you'll get tired of coming up with the right combination of shims and see the light. If you do buy a QCTP, you will need to measure the actual distance between the spindle center and the top of your compound to figure out which post to buy. Best to get the lathe first before buying anything.

D1-3 camlock chucks are not nearly as common as other sizes so you'll need to either search for a D1-3 chuck or mount plain back chucks on a D1-3 back plate. This can come later. I've seen some D1-3 chucks on ebay and that is where I would look first. You have a precision spindle and it would be worth the money to buy a decent 4 jaw chuck. Pratt Burnerds are often found on Colchesters, though they tend to be rather costly in good condition. Take your time with this as the 3 jaw will do you fine while you're learning.

If yours is a Mk. 1, top speed is only 800 rpm and inserted carbide tools may not be the best choice for you. 800 rpm is fine for larger work pieces of harder materials but if you plan to work with small diameters in softer steels/aluminum/brass then you may be better off with HSS. AR Warner sells a nice SCLCR tool that takes HSS CCMW inserts: http://www.arwarnerco.com/p-10-kit-6-38-inch-turning-c-right-hand.aspx. The 3/8" set will probably be a better choice than 1/2" given the size of your lathe. You can also use CCMT and CCGT carbide inserts in these holders if you choose. Or, you can learn to grind HSS tools, which is what I would do.

You have a drill chuck, live center, steady rest and follow rest so you basically are good to go. Once you decide on which tool post you will use, you can decide on other kinds of tools (boring bars, etc). There are all kinds of other things to spend money on but the guys have given you the basics - a good set of dial/digital calipers, a good dial indicator, a dial test indicator to check the concentricity of your spindle if you can afford it and a decent 0-1" micrometer to start with. You can buy other tools but I suggest you wait until you need them. For example, you'll need telescoping gauges when you start to bore holes but you don't need it right now.

One thing I suggest you do buy early on is a precision machinist's level about 10-12" long. The imports are fine and should cost under $100.00: http://www.ebay.com/itm/12-MASTER-P...hash=item460f2d88e0:m:msCwm8wpmEoOwf75n71LJKQ. You will need this to level your lathe and it is something that will need to be done periodically so buy your own and learn to use it.

You will need to obtain some stuff to turn. Most of us recommend 12L14 mild steel, 6061-T6 aluminum and some brass rod to start with. Delrin is also a good material that is very easy to cut. When you can cut these softer materials and hold decent tolerances, move on to other stuff.

Safety glasses are a must in the shop but you know that, right?

Okay, I can't think of anything else but if I missed something, the other guys will slap my head and fill in the blanks. Congrats on the new lathe and welcome to HM!

Oh, and don't forget to look for the change gear set ...
 

British Steel

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#11
While you're using the 4-way toolpost (quick-change are the best thing since bottled beer, but can get costly if you want lots of holders so your go-to tools are ready for action, I'm up to a dozen now...) get the tools shimmed to height then when you change tools put an elastic band around tool and shims to keep 'em together, it'll speed you up!

Dave H. (The other one)
 

killswitch505

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#12
If yours is a Mk. 1, top speed is only 800 rpm and inserted carbide tools may not be the best choice for you. 800 rpm is fine for larger work pieces of harder materials but if you plan to work with small diameters in softer steels/aluminum/brass then you may be better off with HSS. AR Warner sells a nice SCLCR tool that takes HSS CCMW inserts: http://www.arwarnerco.com/p-10-kit-6-38-inch-turning-c-right-hand.aspx. The 3/8" set will probably be a better choice than 1/2" given the size of your lathe. You can also use CCMT and CCGT carbide inserts in these holders if you choose. Or, you can learn to grind HSS tools, which is what I would do.
Huge +1 on this!!!! This is what I have and use on almost everything their threader is also really awesome too
 

HudsonMC

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#13
If yours is a Mk. 1, top speed is only 800 rpm and inserted carbide tools may not be the best choice for you. 800 rpm is fine for larger work pieces of harder materials but if you plan to work with small diameters in softer steels/aluminum/brass then you may be better off with HSS. AR Warner sells a nice SCLCR tool that takes HSS CCMW inserts: http://www.arwarnerco.com/p-10-kit-6-38-inch-turning-c-right-hand.aspx. The 3/8" set will probably be a better choice than 1/2" given the size of your lathe. You can also use CCMT and CCGT carbide inserts in these holders if you choose. Or, you can learn to grind HSS tools, which is what I would do.
Is the only advantage of this setup over hand ground HSS just the grinding? I'm just curious why you recommend that over HSS blanks and a bench grinder.
 

Billh50

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#14
One thing I might suggest, if no has yet, is a steady rest if the lathe doesn't come with one.
 

mikey

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#15
Is the only advantage of this setup over hand ground HSS just the grinding? I'm just curious why you recommend that over HSS blanks and a bench grinder.
I recommended that tool with the assumption that the owner is a new guy and doesn't know how to grind tools, yet wishes to learn to use his lathe asap. That will get him cutting without the speed requirement of carbide tooling. The realization that a well ground HSS tool will be superior to that tool will come in time and he can choose to learn to grind them, or not.
 

ttabbal

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#18
Thank you for the compliment!

You were joking, right?
Mostly.. You don't want to make everyone's lathe cutters? :)

Thanks for the video and info on it. I would like to learn to do it myself once I get more gear to work with.
 

mikey

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#19
Mostly.. You don't want to make everyone's lathe cutters? :)

Thanks for the video and info on it. I would like to learn to do it myself once I get more gear to work with.
Noooo, don't want to go into the HSS tool grinding business! In fact, I've ground some tools for some guys and it became apparent to me very quickly that it was better to show others how to do it themselves than for me to do it for them. That's what prompted the articles I've written on tool grinding. Give it a go; it is not nearly as difficult as it might appear.
 

ttabbal

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#20
I plan to. I need a lathe first though, not much point if I can't test it. I should probably look into fixing up my HF grinder to get a more accurate angle.
 

Darkbluesky

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#21
Thanks for all the info again. Good news is it's the long bed mk1 with the 2 speed motor (must be after reading about them) as the speeds look like they range from 36-1600 rpm. I'm hoping to go with carbide to start as I'm not currently setup to grind tools and am hoping I can narrow down what will already be a steep learning curve I'm sure.

I'm reading up on the change gears as it seems like it's set up with a gearbox for imperial, but I guess swapping out change gears gives more range on avail threads? This one seems like it's setup imperial but I've read of a condor gearbox that would do metric with this particular lathe. Hopefully it's just a case of needing some different gears if I wanted it to do imperial.
 

mikey

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#22
Thanks for all the info again. Good news is it's the long bed mk1 with the 2 speed motor (must be after reading about them) as the speeds look like they range from 36-1600 rpm. I'm hoping to go with carbide to start as I'm not currently setup to grind tools and am hoping I can narrow down what will already be a steep learning curve I'm sure.

I'm reading up on the change gears as it seems like it's set up with a gearbox for imperial, but I guess swapping out change gears gives more range on avail threads? This one seems like it's setup imperial but I've read of a condor gearbox that would do metric with this particular lathe. Hopefully it's just a case of needing some different gears if I wanted it to do imperial.
If it went to the North American market, Tony Griffith indicates it had an Imperial leadscrew and should cut Imperial threads. No lathe is complete without a change gear set so if your lathe has an Imperial leadscrew then a Metric change gear set should be available, and vice versa.

It would be good to confirm that the lathe has a 2-speed motor. A higher speed is better for carbide. However, even 1600 rpm is on the slow side. My lathe goes to 2200 rpm and I just barely make it into the recommended range for carbide for the size and materials I commonly use. Still, carbide may work satisfactorily for you so give it a go.
 

Bob Korves

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#24
Noooo, don't want to go into the HSS tool grinding business! In fact, I've ground some tools for some guys and it became apparent to me very quickly that it was better to show others how to do it themselves than for me to do it for them. That's what prompted the articles I've written on tool grinding. Give it a go; it is not nearly as difficult as it might appear.
Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man how to fish and he will be out drinking with his buddies every day...
 

mikey

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#25
You guys just gave me an idea; I'll start my own thread on it. Self defense can take many forms ...
 
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