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I Weep For The Future....

TOOLMASTER

you don't want to know
Active Member
#62
this was 35 years ago...more than likely drugs were involved....right up there with the pot head that thought it was a good idea to stick his hand in sulfuric acid..then watches his hand melt..
 

Highsider

Active Member
Active Member
#63
Listen or not, she (or longhaired he) wouldn't be in my shop to work without their hair being covered and no loose clothing etc.
A student who doesn't listen belongs in English class Not a shop class where there is dangerous machinery.
 

great white

Active User
Active Member
#67
Here is a guy that wasn't so lucky

I've seen that one before. I think he got off rather lucky myself.

What I can never understand is how long it takes for someone to actually think to turn the bloody lathe off and then how many people run in and out before someone thinks to release the work from the chuck and get the poor SOB outta there....
 

JimDawson

Global Moderator
Staff member
Director
#68
Every generation I have been around has been quoted lamenting about the state of the 'younger generation', and I'd bet my lunch money that the same has been said by every generation since we started walking upright.
That might indicate a slow general decline in the state of generations. The ultimate result may be that, over time, the entire human community will devolve into lime jello. ;)
 

wrmiller

Chief Tinkerer
H-M Supporter-Premium
#69
It has been postulated that the human species has already peaked and is on the downhill slide. Documented declines in overall IQs tends to support this. Is lime jello another word for primordial ooze? ;)
 

great white

Active User
Active Member
#71
It has been postulated that the human species has already peaked and is on the downhill slide. Documented declines in overall IQs tends to support this. Is lime jello another word for primordial ooze? ;)
I blame a lot of it on our trend (as a society) from creating technology to being dependant on it.

For example: younger kids might know more about using an Iphone/iPad than I do, but have very little awareness of what's in it or how it works. I may not be able to build one in the garage, but I sure as heck understand how it works and can identify a lot of the components when I (gasp) crack one open. Given the equipment, I could build one too...

Easy access to the technology that does so much for us has led to a lack of basic skills (ie: math, spelling etc) and its drawing us down a path of "users" vice creators and thinkers. As a society that is...
 

FOMOGO

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#73
They can be scary to watch (the younger generation), but somehow each successive one seems to muddle it's way though and we continue to advance. The world does at times seem to be going to hell in a hand basket, but I try to stay optimistic, mostly because it's beneficial to my general state of mind. There are quite a few very bright young people out there, and there has always been a large supply of the other type through out human history. Mike
 

TommyD

Active Member
Active Member
#75
I used to work at an Ivy League University, I ran a dept. machine shop.

My boss, at the time, was a published professor. He told me he was as better machinist than I was. I told him I was a tool and die maker.

I came in the shop one day and saw him in back by the Lassey hand tapper. He asked," how do you use this"? I told him he was a better machinist than me, figger it out.

I came in from lunch one day, he was in my shop with a potential assistant. My vertical bandsaw blade was broken and as was the cast adjustable arm on my horizontal saw. He looked at me, thrust something into my hands and said he needed it cut, and scurried out of my shop. I delivered it to his office, withpot a word, after I finished welding up my vert saw blade and brazing the cast arm on my horiz. saw.

He used to give his students keys to my shop so they could work in there after hours. I'd come in in the morning and find broken tool bits in my lathes and mill, tools left out and one time, blood. I reported it but never heard anymore about it. These 'kids' had NO machine shop practical experience.

After this I had enough. I went to the Dept. Chair and told him, almost my exact words, Bob is handing out keys to my shop like beads at Mardi Gras. He giggled a bit but saw I was serious. I kid you not.

I left soon after to raise our daughter.


A few years later, I get an email from my old Dept. Business Manager, I had adopted her as my boss and we kept in touch. She included a link saying that a female undergratuate student died when her hair got caught in a lathe chuck while working off hours.. She, the student, had advanced training in machine shop protocols, whatever that is, but still managed to make a fundamtenal mistake. Sad. I never heard what shut the lathe off. Anyhow my Business Manager said they all finally got it why I was so upset that day.

When I was on the bench and going to night skool for 11 years to be an Engineer, we had a saying....those that can, do. Those that can't, teach. I've been in a lot of places, seen a lot of things and have done quite a bit in my time. The stories I got....

I now am trying to prove that old saying wrong, I am currently an Educational Assistant in a Tech Community College. My first real class is Monday night, teaching Lathe Basics to future Engineers. Rolled up sleeves, no dangling jewelry and long hair restrained.o_O
 

TOOLMASTER

you don't want to know
Active Member
#76
soon people will be on disability younger and younger thanks to these stupid toys they sell...in my skateboard days the fear of pain kept us out of trouble...the idiots now just don't care, just watch you tube.
 

atunguyd

Active User
Active Member
#78
and then how many people run in and out before someone thinks to release the work from the chuck and get the poor SOB outta there....
Actually thinking about it that pressure on his back could have fractured his spine. Keeping him in the machine till he could be moved while still kept immobilised would probably be the better option in the long run.


Sent from my SM-N920C using Tapatalk
 

Profkanz

H-M Supporter - Premium Content
H-M Supporter-Premium
#79
I used to work at an Ivy League University, I ran a dept. machine shop.

My boss, at the time, was a published professor. He told me he was as better machinist than I was. I told him I was a tool and die maker.

I came in the shop one day and saw him in back by the Lassey hand tapper. He asked," how do you use this"? I told him he was a better machinist than me, figger it out.

I came in from lunch one day, he was in my shop with a potential assistant. My vertical bandsaw blade was broken and as was the cast adjustable arm on my horizontal saw. He looked at me, thrust something into my hands and said he needed it cut, and scurried out of my shop. I delivered it to his office, withpot a word, after I finished welding up my vert saw blade and brazing the cast arm on my horiz. saw.

He used to give his students keys to my shop so they could work in there after hours. I'd come in in the morning and find broken tool bits in my lathes and mill, tools left out and one time, blood. I reported it but never heard anymore about it. These 'kids' had NO machine shop practical experience.

After this I had enough. I went to the Dept. Chair and told him, almost my exact words, Bob is handing out keys to my shop like beads at Mardi Gras. He giggled a bit but saw I was serious. I kid you not.

I left soon after to raise our daughter.


A few years later, I get an email from my old Dept. Business Manager, I had adopted her as my boss and we kept in touch. She included a link saying that a female undergratuate student died when her hair got caught in a lathe chuck while working off hours.. She, the student, had advanced training in machine shop protocols, whatever that is, but still managed to make a fundamtenal mistake. Sad. I never heard what shut the lathe off. Anyhow my Business Manager said they all finally got it why I was so upset that day.

When I was on the bench and going to night skool for 11 years to be an Engineer, we had a saying....those that can, do. Those that can't, teach. I've been in a lot of places, seen a lot of things and have done quite a bit in my time. The stories I got....

I now am trying to prove that old saying wrong, I am currently an Educational Assistant in a Tech Community College. My first real class is Monday night, teaching Lathe Basics to future Engineers. Rolled up sleeves, no dangling jewelry and long hair restrained.o_O
Profkanz writes,
I have taught machine shop at Santa Ana College for thirty-six years. (retiring in 13 weeks but who's counting)The first week of every semester was spent in safety instruction. This was followed by a safety test with 100 questions. It takes 90% correct to pass. Long sleeves are not allowed at all, even rolled up. Jewelry is not allowed (including rings and watches). Safety glasses are required at all times.
The only serious injury was when I was subbing another instructor's class. Student broke a finger by leaving a lathe chuck wrench in the chuck and with his hand holding the wrench, turned the machine on. Apparently the other instructor was less rigorous about safety.
 

dlane

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#81
Unfortunately most things comes with warning labels AND no instructions nowadays,
They can print what not to do , but tell you nothing about how to make it work !.
I weep for the future
 

spacecadet

Iron
Registered Member
#87
This is one of my favorites, I like to pretend the lathes/mills have become sentient and are rebelling against their human overlords.