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I need to get my mill off of the pallet

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Aukai

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#1
When my mill was delivered it was boxed, and on a sturdy pallet. My friend and I were able to move it into the side of my garage between a fridge, and compressor. It has been left on the pallet because I liked the height, and basically I don't have an easy way to lift it off. This is a Grizzly G0755 with their stand. Do I need to put leveling feet on it, or will tramming the head to the table be enough? I'm going over this with myself, and I can't tell witch one of my selves is the smart one. Thank you
 

Doubleeboy

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#2
Engine Hoist will take care of the lifting. If you don't own one, you can find them on craiglist used frequently or snag one at harbor freight or rent one for a half day at rental company. Even a cheapo HF one is useful and handy for lifting, just don't use them at full rating, your mill should easily be handled by a 1 or 2 ton hoist.
 

Aukai

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#3
I have one just not sure where to lift from, and still wondering about the tramming.



 

mikey

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#4
Agree with Mike - an engine hoist is the simplest way to go.

You don't need to get the stand dead level but it doesn't hurt. Most surfaces are not really level so some method of leveling is helpful. If you are going to leave it one place then just get some machine pads and use bolts. If you might have to move it then leveling casters are really nice; I use Carrymaster casters for just this purpose.

Edit: just saw your pics. Use straps under the head and lift it just enough to get the pallet out. I don't have a mill like yours but most benchtop mills are trammed by shimming under the base of the column.
 

Ed ke6bnl

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#5
I made a steel plate with for 2 in tube legs and have my Bridgeport about 5 in. off the ground. I like it and I can move it with a pallet jack at any time.
 

tq60

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#6
Leave it on the pallet as it makes easy moving when you get a pallet jack....Once you have one of those you will regret not having one.

The existing pallet is designed to support the machine for shipping from factory to you so good to go.

Our bp us on a pallet but nota very good one....will change someday...

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk
 

Cobra

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#7
Great mill!
I have attached a couple of shots to see how we did it.
I cut the pallet down to fit between the legs of the engine hoist and then made up lifting cables from 1/4" cable.
There are holes in the side of the base to put rids through and hook the cables to them.
Just lift high enough to take the weight off then slowly move.
The third shot is the supports I put on after the first six months. The stand is too short for me and I was always bent over.
I used hockey pucks and round steel plates with adjusting screws for the leveling feet.
Good luck with the install.
Jim


20130427_155018.jpg 20130428_140002.jpg

IMG_0007.JPG IMG_0008.JPG
 

Downwindtracker2

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#9
I'm another hockey puck user. My RF-45 is on a angle iron frame with four heavy cast iron castors. The frame is underslung, castors on the side, I didn't need much of an extra lift, and it gives a wider, more stable track. When it rolls to a new bigger shop. Instead of a plate I dimpled the puck with a 5/8" ball mill . I turned down the end of 3/4" redi-rod to 5/8" and used a shaping tool bit to round the end. The pucks sit directly on the concrete and the redi-rod adjusts for leveling and lifting off the castors.
 

Bob La Londe

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#10
The lift holes in the stand are awesome aren't they. I used a straight pick and pair of farm jacks to lift my lathe (2000lbs) on and off furniture dollies to move it with those holes.
 

Aukai

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#11
Thank you for the replies, Jim the pictures are great, very helpful, nice project for the new table.

 

Aukai

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#13
While this method is obviously not workable, I had the same damn thought:grin big::grin big:
 

francist

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#14
There was a steeple jack in the UK during the 1970's who got hired to knock down a lot of the old Victorian-era industrial chimneys. He did exactly that: started removing bricks around one side of the chimney at ground level. As he went, he'd shore up the vacant areas with heavy timbers. When he got to just under hallway round, he filled the bottom of the whole affair with rubber tires (tyres) and set them ablaze. Tires ignited timbers, timbers burned through, smokestack fell over. Simple!

-frank
 

Aukai

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#15
I kinda want it to land on it's feet, without the tipping maneuver.
 

BFHammer

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#16
I cut the pallet under mine with a reciprocating saw so that I could get the hoist into position. Piece of cake after that.
To get the height right and get some mobility I built a base and added these casters:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00I2JH81U/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o09_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

The casters are a little pricey but I have been very pleased with them. They are stable and allow to easily move the mill on the rare occasion that I need to.


IMG_2535.JPG IMG_2536.JPG IMG_2561.JPG
IMG_2527.JPG
 

Dawner

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#18
When my mill was delivered it was boxed, and on a sturdy pallet. My friend and I were able to move it into the side of my garage between a fridge, and compressor. It has been left on the pallet because I liked the height, and basically I don't have an easy way to lift it off. This is a Grizzly G0755 with their stand. Do I need to put leveling feet on it, or will tramming the head to the table be enough? I'm going over this with myself, and I can't tell witch one of my selves is the smart one. Thank you
I had the same problem I drilled and tapped a 1/2 inch hole in the middle of my column and used an eye bolt. ( more than likely voiding the warranty ) then used an engine hoist to put it in place on a stand. Went through a 6 pack of beer right after that , just To calm my my nerves. It worked, and I Did it myself (I just turned 60) . So there ;)~ dawner
 

Aukai

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#19
You da man...:eagerness: Won't be drilling though:)
 

jpfabricator

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#20

Aukai

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#21
LOL, that is true. My house was built in 1989, and I'm a few years into a 85% re sheet of the exterior of my house done on weekends. Don't want to do that again. Plus fumigation is a pain in the ass.

And I hate wood......
 
Last edited:

pineyfolks

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#22
If you're comfortable with the height it's setting on the wooden pallet, you could make a metal pallet with leveling feet the same height and slide it on to it. My small horizontal mill and drillpress are setup that way and are easily moved with a pallet jack.
 

Aukai

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#23
I think your on to something there. One of my freight forwarders has one, and he still has to deliver my lathe when it gets here. We may need to figure this out. Thanks.
 
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