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How do you replace the bearings in a motor?

Discussion in 'ELECTRICAL ISSUES - POWER YOUR MACHINES & SHOP' started by Nels, Apr 10, 2011.

  1. Nels

    Nels United States Founder Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 16, 2011
  2. wawoodman

    wawoodman himself, himself H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Nelson,
    I just googled "bearing shop queens NY" and got 3 hits. Once you get the old bearings out, just take them to the nearest shop. Generally, bearings are pretty reasonable.

    A puller and a press will be your friends.
     
  3. Starlight Tools

    Starlight Tools Active User Active Member

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    Nelson

    Bearings are relatively easy to get ahold of. I keep dozens in staock and so would any small motor or other repair shop. Also there are industrial bearing houses and many car type parts stores.

    Bearing removal, I have dozens of different bearing pullers and press fixtures just to facilite that. My Arbour press is what I will use most of the time. Supported by bearing knives like shown in the front page of that youtube video. If the rotor is too large in diameter to fit the arbour press, then it is either the big H-Frame Hydraulic press or a two or three arm puller, or a strong back puller like shown on the youtube picture. Bench grinders can be a bit tricky in that the shaft is really long for bearing pullers.

    Walter
     
  4. Starlight Tools

    Starlight Tools Active User Active Member

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    Also

    Bearing heaters are pretty rare beasts, very few home shops will have them.

    When ever possible, and unless you have grease fittings on the motor, err for 2RS bearings with the two rubber seals. Open and shielded bearings let too much crap into the bearing in typical applications

    Walter
     
  5. Nels

    Nels United States Founder Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Walter,

    I understand how a puller like the 2-jaw puller in the video is used, but I'm lost on how the arbour press works to separate the bearing and properly replace the new one. Perhaps a photo?
    Thanks,

    Nelson
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 4, 2011
  6. Nels

    Nels United States Founder Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Can someone identify these pullers?

    So many pullers needed to do bearings. Can someone identify the ones in these photos please? ::headscratch::

    Thanks!!


    Nelson

    Bearing3.jpg Bearing2.jpg Bearing4.jpg Bearing5.jpg Bearing1.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 24, 2011
  7. Fishchips

    Fishchips Active User Active Member

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    The first pic pullers are for bearings close to the end of the shaft, the other for a bearing deep on a crankshaft ie air compressor crank. I use a coiled single element hotplate for installing bearings.
     
  8. StonewellMark

    StonewellMark United States Active User Active Member

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    I just re-wired (some dumbass previous owner cut the wires just outside the motor housing), and replace the bearings in my rockwell tool grinder. The bearings are easy to come by, just get the part number off the old ones, find a set of Timkens. What a pain to re-assemble, I kept deforming the starter spring "plate" and the grinder wouldn't start, just hum. Then I got "smart" and used an ohm meter during re-assembly walla a working motor. As far as pullers I just used a cheapo 2 jaw puller. Best of luck.

    Mark
     
  9. Terry Lingle

    Terry Lingle Canada Swarf Registered Member

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    a bearing heater is as simple as a 60 or 100 watt light bulb in a stable socket just balance the bearing on the bulb and flip the switch after 5 min or so flip it over ( the actual time is bearing and bulb dependent) but the objective is even heat on the inner race. I try for about 220 Deg F or spit sizzles temperatures .
    A clean journal and a light wipe with never seize. with a little practice the bearing should slide into place with firm hand pressure ( wear gloves )
     
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  10. gonzo

    gonzo United States Active Member Active Member

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    On some of the larger motors the end bells have to go back on the end they came off of and the orientation kept the same as before. The best way is to punch a set of dots on adjacent surfaces before disassembly.
    Sometimes when this is not done the shaft will lock up upon reassembly.
    This is mostly a problem on larger motors with cast iron bells. However it's good not to take a chance.
     
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  11. Silverbullet

    Silverbullet Active Member Active Member

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    The puller set up in the second picture will do what you need , use the smallest separator then bolts to your puller. It won't hurt to use a bit of kroil on the shaft as you pull it. Bearings can bought lots of places Grainger , McMaster Carr , eBay . They are usually sealed bearings so most any of the shielded type in your size will work. Heating bearing may not be necessary , many times I find it easier to freeze the shaft overnight in a freezer . Usually the bearings drop on with light pressure. Then it's just putting it back together. Try not to rub any of the finish off the wound wires. Any dirt use a soft brush lightly clean what you can. If you have a brush run motor take care getting those in.
     

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