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Hello, new member from upstate NY

jaredbeck

Iron
Registered Member
#1
Hi, Looking forward to meeting people here and learning to operate hobby-shop equipment.

I'm a metalworking novice. I've built two of the David Gingery machines: the sheet-metal brake and the lil' bertha furnace. I'll try to include some pics. I just got introduced to mig welding this year. Currently learning about hobby lathes and getting ready to buy one, probably new. I'm looking at 12" lathes like the Grizzly G4003 and the PM-1236, but maybe I should start smaller.
 

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westsailpat

H-M Supporter - Premium Content
H-M Supporter-Premium
#2
Nice work Jared , what are you melting and making with the furnace ? Making some castings ? I think a 12" would be a fine lathe to have and learn on , sometimes I think a small lathe can be a bit limiting and difficult to set up . Good luck !
 

mikey

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#3
Welcome to the site, Jared!

There are a LOT of threads on buying a new lathe or mill. While the search function here is not that great, you'll find lots to read. Then ask questions and the guys will help.
 

RandyWilson

H-M Supporter - Premium Content
H-M Supporter-Premium
#5
I use google for forum searches. Not just here, all forums. It works better than the built in search most times. example:

site:hobby-machinist.com buying a new lathe
 

jaredbeck

Iron
Registered Member
#7
Hi everyone, thanks for the friendly welcome!

Nice work Jared , what are you melting and making with the furnace ? Making some castings ?
I'm having trouble preparing my greensand, but I've managed to do a few really basic aluminum castings. Maybe the moisture is not right, or clay/sand ratio is wrong (can you have too much clay?) I think I'm ramming hard enough, but my flasks keep dumping out. I definitely need more practice.

Welcome to the site, Jared! There are a LOT of threads on buying a new lathe or mill. While the search function here is not that great, you'll find lots to read. Then ask questions and the guys will help.
Thanks, I'm trying to research different manufacturers. So far, the only ones I know of are Grizzly, HF, and PM, but I'm sure there are a lot more. PM is at the top of my list, but everything they offer is on backorder right now.

Welcome from a fellow upstater!
Hey, you're from Rochester? I went to RIT. Wish I'd taken advantage of the machine shops while I was there, but I had my head buried in computer stuff.

I use google for forum searches. Not just here, all forums. It works better than the built in search most times. example:

site:hobby-machinist.com buying a new lathe
I'll try that, thanks for the tip!
 

Silverbullet

Active Member
Active Member
#8
Nice builds, welcome to the site. Little advise never think 12" lathe is to big. I wouldn't advise anything smaller unless your a clock builder or jeweraly dealer. Before the LATHES a year old I bet you wish you went even bigger. Read up on the LATHES you'll find small take small cuts and lack the strength to do some jobs like parting . A good place to learn is YouTube , Mr Pete , Abom, doubleboost @ funny guy ,, oxtool.

Good luck have fun , ABOVE ALL BE SAFE , EYES , FINGERS , HANDS DONT GROW BACK. Wear eye protection , no long hair , no loose clothing long sleeves a no no.
 

DaveInMi

Active Member
Active Member
#10
Welcome! I built the Gingery stuff you have plus a couple of other furnaces, the mill and dividing head. His recipe for foundry sand has worked well for me. Be sure to mix well dry so that each grain of sand is coated with clay. Moisture content is then just an experiment. You will learn to squeze a handful and see how it holds together and breaks.
 

Technical Ted

Active Member
Active Member
#13
Welcome from a fellow New Yorker. Not too far from the Ithaca area... Dansville, which is south of Rochester about 40 miles.

I strongly suggest looking into some used lathes. I see nice ones on the Rochester Craigslist all the time. You will spend a lot more money on tooling for the lathe than you will the lathe itself. If you're patient you can probably find a used beauty with a lot of tooling included. Lots of good brands, but I would mainly look at the older American built ones like South Bend. Also, LeBlond, Monarch, Hendy, etc., but there seem to be a lot of South Bends around in NY. It's hard to beat some of the older American made gems! I'd take these over most of the new ones, unless you want to spend big money for a sizable machine. Lots of guys love the 9" South Bends. Mine is a 15" and I love it.

Just my two cents,
Ted
 

Uglydog

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#14
Nice builds, and welcome to HM!

I need to finish my foundry. How do you lift the lid/cover on/off?
Or don't you use one?
The foundry I'm finishing assumes two people both able to do a controlled lift on a bar inserted in some hooks on the heavy lid.
Looking for ideas.

Welcome to HM.

Daryl
MN
 

Bob Korves

H-M Supporter - Premium Content
H-M Supporter-Premium
#16
Welcome to H-M, Jared. Your work on the furnace and brake projects moved you out of the metalworking novice category... I would agree with a 12x36, and I would also agree with looking for a used lathe as well.
 

jaredbeck

Iron
Registered Member
#18
Nice builds, welcome to the site. Little advise never think 12" lathe is to big. I wouldn't advise anything smaller unless your a clock builder or jeweraly dealer. Before the LATHES a year old I bet you wish you went even bigger. Read up on the LATHES you'll find small take small cuts and lack the strength to do some jobs like parting . A good place to learn is YouTube , Mr Pete , Abom, doubleboost @ funny guy ,, oxtool.
Thanks for the advice re: swing size. I've also noticed that the smaller lathes don't have much travel in their compound, cross-slide, or tailstock quill, and I'm thinking that'd be pretty limiting.

I've been watching Mr. Pete and Abom for a while now. I can't understand a word doubleboost says :). Another channel I like is Halligan142. His is the first machinist channel I ever found on YT.

Welcome! I built the Gingery stuff you have plus a couple of other furnaces, the mill and dividing head. His recipe for foundry sand has worked well for me. Be sure to mix well dry so that each grain of sand is coated with clay. Moisture content is then just an experiment. You will learn to squeze a handful and see how it holds together and breaks.
Nice! I bet the mill was a big project! How long did it take you?

My greensand is pretty dry right now, so I'll find something to tumble it in, give it a good mix. Thanks for that tip!

Welcome from a fellow New Yorker. Not too far from the Ithaca area... Dansville, which is south of Rochester about 40 miles.
So many upstate New Yorkers, and so many from the Rochester area! Nice to meet y'all.

I need to finish my foundry. How do you lift the lid/cover on/off?
Or don't you use one?
The foundry I'm finishing assumes two people both able to do a controlled lift on a bar inserted in some hooks on the heavy lid.
Looking for ideas.
MN
Hi Daryl, There is a lid, I'll see if I can find another picture. I also made some lifting tongs so I can safely move my crucible. For pouring tongs (I think it's called a shank?) I use regular fireplace log pliers for now .. probably not the safest, I worry about squeezing the graphite crucible too tightly.
 

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DaveInMi

Active Member
Active Member
#19
Thanks for the advice re: swing size. I've also noticed that the smaller lathes don't have much travel in their compound, cross-slide, or tailstock quill, and I'm thinking that'd be pretty limiting.

I've been watching Mr. Pete and Abom for a while now. I can't understand a word doubleboost says :). Another channel I like is Halligan142. His is the first machinist channel I ever found on YT.



Nice! I bet the mill was a big project! How long did it take you?

My greensand is pretty dry right now, so I'll find something to tumble it in, give it a good mix. Thanks for that tip!



So many upstate New Yorkers, and so many from the Rochester area! Nice to meet y'all.



Hi Daryl, There is a lid, I'll see if I can find another picture. I also made some lifting tongs so I can safely move my crucible. For pouring tongs (I think it's called a shank?) I use regular fireplace log pliers for now .. probably not the safest, I worry about squeezing the graphite crucible too tightly.
The Gingery mill took most of a winter over 10 years ago.
 

Ulma Doctor

Infinitely Curious
Active Member
#20
Hi Jared,
you came to the right place to learn and share information!
nice work on the forge and brake!
you can't go wrong with a 1236, i have a Shenwai and i love it!
welcome aboard
 

Uglydog

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium
#22
There is a lid, I'll see if I can find another picture. I also made some lifting tongs so I can safely move my crucible. For pouring tongs (I think it's called a shank?) I use regular fireplace log pliers for now .. probably not the safest, I worry about squeezing the graphite crucible too tightly.
Kieth Rucker has a video in which he designed a hinge allowing it to lift upward.
I'm hoping to design a rotating hinge which will allow it to swing backward as if on a 1tpi or 2tpi acme screw or cam.

Daryl
MN