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Grizzly G0752 Or Sieg Sc8

Discussion in 'GRIZZLY INDUSTRIAL INC.' started by Franko, Mar 5, 2015.

  1. Franko

    Franko Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I’ve decided it is time to upgrade my Lathe. I’ve been using a 9x19 Grizzly G4000 for the last 10 years and it has served me well, but it has always had a few shortcomings, insufficiently low speed, length and spindle bore. I don’t need one much longer, but I’ve stretched mine almost past its limits when threading a couple 16” rifle barrels.

    I’m looking for a good quality variable speed medium size lathe not any heavier than about 500 pounds. Because of the size and nature of my shop, I need to be able to move it sometimes and I like being able to use a heavy tool chest as a base. Wheels has worked well on my G400, but I may make pallet height feet on the new one and move it with a pallet jack. But, I have to be able to move it. Lathe work is only a fraction of the tasks I do in my shop. Also, price is an object. I can afford about $2000.

    I’m not interested in buying an old lathe that will need to be restored. First, I don’t know enough about lathes to trust that I’m up to a full blown restoration. Secondly, I have projects that need to be done on a lathe and that doesn’t include spending a half a year building a lathe.

    Two lathes have caught my eye.
    The 10x22 Grizzly G-0752 variable speed
    and the new Sieg SC8 11x30 variable speed.

    The Sieg SC8 is a tad longer than I’d prefer, but it has several very nifty features that appeal to me, such as a cross slide drive, dual drive screws and MT2 tailstock so I can use the collection of live centers and chucks I’ve accumulated for the Grizzly and my HF 7x14 Mini Lathe.

    They both cost about the same. The Grizzly comes with more accessories, but the Sieg has more features. It is missing a steady rest and tailstock chuck, but those are easy and inexpensive enough to afford.

    I guess the crux of my question is about the quality and reputation of Sieg lathes. I have two Grizzly machines and I know what to expect and they’ve performed well for my purposes. The Sieg looks good, but I just don’t know. The other thing is I’d like to upgrade the 5” 3-jaw chuck to 6” on either of them.

    Any advise or experience with Sieg I’d appreciate. I am open to alternatives, but variable speed is a deal breaker. Unless the alternative already has it, or can be readily, reasonably and simply modified, I’m intimidated by that. I really want something I can use with just the average clean up and tune up right out of the crate.
     
  2. ronboult

    ronboult Australia Active User Active Member

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    Hi Franko
    Sorry for not responding earlier but just seen your request.
    I have some experience of Sieg machines in that I own a SC4 lathe and a SX3 mill. My general impressions are that I am happy with both but I am outgrowing the SC4 like you.
    In general I believe that the general quality and finish of the Sieg machines is better than most of the generic Chinese lathes imported into Australia.

    With regard to the SC4 lathe the things I really like are the Variable Speed and the Power Crossfeed, very useful for fine finish facing and parting off.

    The things I dont like are the Spindle mount and the lack of a QCGB.

    I am about to buy a new lathe this week and have been looking over the options. I have finally chosen to buy anothe Sieg but which one?

    My options were a SC8, a SC10 or a Sieg Runmaster.

    The Sieg SC8 was eliminated because while it has a QCGB for threading and Feed the spindle mount is its major downfall- same as on the SC4. The spindle has a flat flange with a locating sholder and 4 holes for bolting on the chuck. Three problems are that it is very fiddly, slow and inaccurate. Getting the bolts or nuts if you substitute studs in the chuck body, in behind the flange is quite a challenge and in my case the locating shoulder is slightly undersize which means I have to spend extra time moving the chuck until it runs true.

    The SC10 has all the feature I required. QCGB, D1-4 spindle mount, variable speed and power crossfeed. I nearly bought this lathe and would have been very very happy, but then the Australian Dealer talked me into the Runmaster. A much more substantial lathe ( 330x 1000, 13x40) for not much more money at least in Au.

    So in summary have a look at a SC10. I think it ticks all the boxes and I would be happy to own it. I think the chuck mount on a SC8 is a deal breaker!

    Ron
     
  3. Franko

    Franko Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Thanks for the reply, Ron.

    I decided against either the Sieg or the Grizzly and opted for a PM1127VF-LB. I didn't care for the electronic buttons on the Sieg and Grizzly so I'm not dependent on proprietary replacements that may or may not be available. Buttons, switches and motor controllers are readily available all over the place.

    The PM1127 has lots of features I desired,
    variable speed in three ranges, slow 50 rpm low speed,
    6 inch 3-jaw chuck,
    cross slide feed, twin lead screws and a little more power,
    plus a full compliment of basic accessories like steady and follow rests,
    tailstock drill chuck and live centers and an AXA QCTP.
    It has 7" hardened ways yet weighs in at just over 500 pounds, so I can put it on a mobile stand.
    Best of all, the 1.5" spindle bore was a deal maker.

    I'm not sure how the backing plate or chuck mounts to the spindle. Looks like a key-hole mount, but I'm not certain.

    The down side is the 10 week wait for it. It's ok. I have a lathe and it will give me time to design and build a suitable mobile base for it. I think it is about 3 weeks away from me now.
     
  4. ronboult

    ronboult Australia Active User Active Member

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    Hi Franko
    Your lathe seems like a very good choice. PM have a very good reputation and unfortunately we dont seem to have any similar quality specialty importers in Au.

    I had a look at the PM website and it seems to have very good specifications. The only deal breaker from my point of view is the direct mount (3 studs) chuck. I will never buy another lathe with this mount again.

    The other " problem" is that it has imperial leadscrew and crosslide. You poor Americans will never learn. Just joking HaHa

    Hope you really enjoy your new lathe when it arrives.
    Cheers
    Ron
     
  5. bpratl

    bpratl United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Franko, I think that you are making a good choice in the PM1127 lathe. I presently have a Grizzly G0602 that has been modified extensively and if I had to do it again I would go with the PM1127 which would have cost me a lot less after the mods. Bob
     
  6. Franko

    Franko Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I hope so, Bob. I never heard of Precision Mathews until I joined this board. I had lusted for the Grizzly gunsmith lathe for a couple years, but it weight and price made it prohibitive for me and my shop accommodations.

    Ron, they told us the US was switching to metric when I was in grade school. But, it never happened. It is a real pain, as if you want to wrench anything nowadays, you have to have two sets of sockets and wrenches at hand. I have lots of metric equipment, cars and motorcycles. Being not as familiar with it, I find it difficult to visually recognize bolt and nut sizes. I can look at a imperial nut or bolt and know what size it is. I have to use a gauge for metric, except if it is kinda small but not real small, it is usually safe to assume to use a 10mm wrench, or 4 or 5mm allen. :)
     
  7. ronboult

    ronboult Australia Active User Active Member

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    Franko I fully understand your preference for Imperial measurements because of your long association. However two competeing systems never work and since the world is shrinking then eventually something with have to give. Let me suggest that the metric system does have some significant advantages and when you get used to it it becomes very easy. Au changed to metric when I was in my teens and I now think and work completely in metric without another thought.

    With regard to your lathe were you suggesting that the spindle has some sort of keyholes for the attachment studs so you dont have to completely remove the nuts to change chucks. When you get your lathe can you post some details/ photos to clarify how it works.

    If not then permanently fitting a suitable backplate to the spindle, then changing to front mount chucks will make chuck changing more convienent albeit at extra cost.
    Ron
     
  8. Franko

    Franko Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I understand metric and wish we would have adopted it. But, I have to work with Imperial because all the materials available are measured Imperial.

    All I know about the chuck on the PM1127 is from this small blurb in the PDF manual. The chuck on the lathe they send me may or may not work that way. There are some differences between the new lathe and what is described in the PDF manual available on Quality Tools website.

    Screen Shot 2015-04-22 at 6.35.38 PM.png
     
  9. ronboult

    ronboult Australia Active User Active Member

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    Franko from what you have posted it does seem to have a quick release mechanism. If you change chucks frequently like me it should make the changeover easy. Will be interested in the accuracy of the fitting without a spindle taper. I expect that being a PM machine it will be quite good.

    With respect to measuring systems you just have to live with what is available. Fortunately all modern cars in Au are metric so I now only need one set of spanners (wrenches) and metric fasteners, tools are all readily available. Steel, alu brass etc are available in both systems but not too hard to get metric if it is available at all. Supplies of smaller quantities of raw metals are not always easy to obtain. Au has a small population widely distributed so not a lot of demand locally.
    Ron
     
  10. Matt P

    Matt P Australia Iron Registered Member

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    Ron
    I just purchased a PM 14140GT from Whitelaw Engineering in Brisbane, they maybe able to help you with a PM lathe if you're still looking.
    Matt P
     
  11. 32chevy

    32chevy United States Iron Registered Member

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    Please let us know how you like it and post some pics. I'm looking just as you did for the same reasons. I'm looking at the 1228
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2017
  12. ronboult

    ronboult Australia Active User Active Member

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    Hi Matt
    Thanks for the heads up on Whitelaw.

    Actually I went ahead and purchased a Sieg Runmaster 330 x 1000 over a year ago.
    Its Ok - typical chinese manufacture but with a bit of TLC it now performs good enough for me.
    Hope your 1440 lives up to your expectations. Dont forget to start a new thread We expect plenty of pictures
    Ron
     

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