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Got My First Lathe... Logan 1875 - With Restoration.

Mr Mike

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Again I Failed.. but there may be a silver lining..!

Ok so I got tired running around town looking for a pro spray gun, Well I run around town every day doing service work.. But I stopped at the 3 major paint shops this week. Not one caries Devilbiss or Binks spray guns.. so I went back to HF and after 2 more trips to HF was ready to prime, Trip 1. to get a conventional none HVLP pressure pot spray gun.... The pressure Pot, Fluid & Air lines and Regulator were all good... But lol the fluid needle in the gun was defective.. Trip 2. to get a replacement Fluid needle.

I hooked everything up to begin priming and tested a few spray spots on rocks - looked kinda ok..
Immediately when I started spraying the chip tray I could tell this was going to be a disaster.. But hey.. I can always sand and start over I'm thinking..! So now's as good a time as any to figure out the gun and make adjustments till I get the primer to spray right.

I fallowed the primer directions to a tee.. 9 to 19 psi on the Fluid, and 50 to 60 Psi on the Air - The directions did state that an Conventional Devilbiss JAG pressure pot gun with a 777 cap and E or F = 1.8mm 1.4mm Needle Or equivalent, The HF meets all the requirements. Well all but one...

The one thing I couldn't determine would be the Devilbiss 777 spray cap.. Which may be the difference in my ability to spray the darn stuff properly. It was breezy out but not windy, and cool around 60 Deg. So I should have at some point got a decent spray pattern even with a cheap HF setup that was working without Issue.. I could not get a decent atomization and I could not find any fault with the HF setup at all.

After failing miserably I cleaned the spray equipment up all nice and clean.. and put everything away but I didn't release pressure off the tank because tomorrow we are going to give it another go..

The Silver Lining..

This primer is frigin amazing. within 20 minutes it was dry to the touch.. And in about and hour I couldn't scratch it off with my finger nails... And when I went to used a Medium Scotch Bright pad to rub down the rough high spots.. It did nothing to the primer, the pad had no residue on it.. the primer was hard as a rock.

I'm going to do a little testing on the primer tomorrow, See what damages it. lol even when cleaning out the not yet dry spray equipment, I used paint thinner.. It had amost no effect. I had to use acetone to clean everything up. But paint thinner is what they told me to use to clean up with.. Hmm..

In either case I'm going to do my best to figure out how to spray this stuff... The other option was an Airless with a .13 to .19 tip. which I have but, what a clean up nightmare that will be.

No luck yet.. To be continued...

AttempToPrimerChipTray.jpg

This is the best example of Orange Peel I've ever seen. Hides every imperfection.

AttempToPrimerChipTray1.jpg
 
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Mr Mike

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So the good news is I talked with the paint people today at PPG, and will be heading to the store tomorrow morning.. They have been super helpful from the start at the commercial store.. I told them what I have tried and done and my problem spraying it..

Matt the person thats been putting up with me from the start said he would be glad to help me solve the problems I'm having spraying this stuff.

I also did a little testing on the primer, Paint thinner doesn't attack it, Denatured Alcohol just cleans it, Acetone is its Nemesis and takes it off. I used a SS wire hand brush and the first seveal strokes did nothing at all and after I vigorously scrubbed one area, it seemed to make it just a little dirty. I got my palm sander with 80 grit paper and after about five minutes of sanding, the primer was starting to smooth out.. the sanding created a fine dust powder like flour almost.

After sanding with the palm sander I got the orbital sander out with 80 grit and started making a good dent in the primer, tons of powder coming off.. at this point in this 24" x 24" area I removed most of the orange peel leaving behind a smooth layer of primer. I changed to a 220 grit paper which was less like sanding and more like polishing it.

In the photo below acetone was used in the bare metal area. and further down Past that area I sanded with 80 and then 220 grit paper. The top was sanded with a palm sander with 80 grit paper, just a few passes, this just stated knocking down the orange peel.


ChipTrayPrimerOrangePeelSanded.jpg

The white primer covered the original gray paint with a single coat.
When I can finally spray this primer properly it will be an outstanding base coat. It builds quick and can be sanded smooth. You cant damage or scratch it off with your finger nail, Its designed to be corrosion resistant, Love how tough it is.

Excerpt from TDC:
--
PITTSBURGH Paints Alkyd Fast Dry 2.8 VOC Universal Primers are corrosion inhibitive primers formulated especially to coat interior or exterior metal surfaces to prepare for most topcoats. Uses include parts, machinery, and other fabricated metal surfaces. May be topcoated with a variety of finishes including epoxies, urethanes, acrylics and other alkyds. FOR METAL SUBSTRATES ONLY
--

ChipTrayPrimerOrangePeelSanded1.jpg

In reading the TDS about the Primer, Xylene is what should be used for clean up - It actually states under - CLEANUP: 97-727 Paint Thinner <--- the 727 is their code for Xylene. Note: Xylene vapor is bad for your liver big time, DANGER - Xylene has a cumulative effect, so don't breath it or get it on you, kids.

Well thats all I got for today... till next time.
 
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Nogoingback

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Mr. Mike, you're doing a great job fixing up that lathe. Can't wait to see the finished
machine: it's going to look fabulous.
 

Mr Mike

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Mr. Mike, you're doing a great job fixing up that lathe. Can't wait to see the finished
machine: it's going to look fabulous.
Hello Nogoingback, Thanks for the vote of confidence... I hope your right.
 

hermetic

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Hi Mr Mike, good job! I think your paint is too thick for the temperature you are spraying in, the paint is not running together enough before it tacks off, so you get the orange peel finish. The pressure pot delivers a LOT of paint, and for normal work indoors in a heated spray shop, the primer is mixed with thinner to the consistency of creamy milk, try using more thinners and don't try to rub down too much,far better and easier to spray a thinner coat to bury the orange peel. just take the tops off the orange peel with 100 to 160 grit paper used wet, then dry off, tack rag and spray more primer, but thinner and see how it goes, Good Luck!,
 

Mr Mike

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Hello Hermetic, I did pretty much just like you said, sanded down all the orange peel to a semi smooth surface, and re-primed the chip pan. I was going to use my airless to respray the primer I like but its not capable of spraying hot solvents. So in order to get this job rolling I changed from a solvent to a water based system using a fine finish tip in the airless. Its not going to be the new out of box finish I was shooting for, but still acceptable.

Tee Supports are on and Its ready for the Dark Grey topcoat.

ResprayedPrimer.jpg

I'm probably being over picky, while it looks pretty good their are imperfections scattered over the chip pan. I really should have built a tank and stripped it. I also tried to match the original color - I Eye-Balled a color chart to the cleanest area under the chip pan.. its kinda close to the original none faded color - the new paint is a couple shades off but close enough for a 39+ year old lathe.

ChipPanBefor.jpg
ChipPanDarkGray.jpg

The paint its self came out pretty decent, The paint is thick bodied and did a good job hiding small flaws, I'd give the overall finish of the chip pan a 70%. While the primer & paint did not lay out as flat and smooth as an automotive grade paint job, Its what you might see on some steel front doors.

ChipPanDarkGrayImperfections.jpg

I didn't even notice the dings near the bottom corner, other than that this side of the chip pan came out pretty darn good. Also you cant see it well in the photos but before I painted I rounded off the sharp edges of the lip so the paint would have something to hold on to. I let it bake in the sun all day then put it with all the other completed items to keep it safe.

ChipPanDarkGraySunBathing.jpg

The primer I used is Sherwin Williams Pro Industrial Pro-Cryl Universal Acrylic Primer, Its main application is corrosion resistance of Metals & Machinery, The paint I used is Sherwin Williams semi gloss Pro Industrial Water Based Alkyd Urethane, Its main application is heavy cleaning, handling & abrasion resistance.

The chip pan will be set aside for 14 days to fully cure and harden. I'm sure by then it will look much better since I wont be critiquing it as closely as you would just after painting. Also once the lathe bed and assembly is put back in place 50% of the imperfections will be hidden or disappear from view. I'll do a scratch and hardness test after its fully cured to see if its as tough as I was told it would be.

Over all I'm fine with the way the chip pan came out. Even if I would have stripped it clean, the best I could hope for painting with an airless would maybe be a 80% finish.

Next up will be the Small Pedestal or maybe both cabinets depending, I wont be able to spray the interior of the small pedestal with the airless due to space limitation with the none removable shelving... I'll get the color close with a rattle can thou.
 
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hermetic

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Well, that topcoat looks fine for a machine tool to me! Too much gloss and the marks show real easy!!, Keep up the good work!
Phil
 

Mr Mike

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I'm hopping i'll have better luck painting the cabinets then I did with the chip pan.
I've stripped or sanded smooth to the touch all old paint from the exterior of the small pedestal.

I'm going to try and finish painting both cabinets this weekend.

SmallCabinetPrep.jpg SmallCabinetPrep1.jpg
SmallCabinetPrep2.jpg

I had to reposition the hoist to the top of the gantry to accommodate the additional height of the tee supports on the cabinets .
The cabinets would be impossible to move once painted without a way to lift and keep off the ground, while the paint dries.

SmallCabinetPrep3.jpg
SmallCabinetPrep4.jpg

I will remove the door from the larger cabinet also, then strip and prep for paint.

BigCabinetBefore1.jpg
BigCabinetBefore2.jpg
BigCabinetBefore3.jpg

I have fingers crossed for beautiful weather this weekend ...
 

HRgx

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What a superb job you are doing Mr Mike. It's going to turn out so nice that you may not want to use it...LOL
 

Mr Mike

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Well I got lucky. The pin holes went all the way through the cabinet making it possible to extract them using a blunted nail, Logan doesn't sell these tags any more... I have see some videos of these being restored.

CabinetLabelOff.jpg

Both cabinets are prepped and ready for primer.. They were sanded smooth down to 220 grit, Smooth to the touch.

LrgCabinetPrepForPaint.jpg SmlCabinetPrepForPaint.jpg

The primer went on Excellent for an airless using a fine finish 312 Tip, So far I'm thrilled.. Ill let them dry over night and spray them Dark Gray in the morning.

The tee supports really helped with ease of access, And the hoist a life saver making aligning the cabinets to the Saw Horses a breeze.

SmlCabinetPrimed.jpg

LrgCabinetPrimed.jpg
My only complaint is you end up wasting a little over a cup of paint during the clean out phase of the airless, On the plus side you can spray two light coats in under five minutes a cabinet..
 
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hermetic

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Provided you paint is not a two pack type, you can drain the thinned primer back into an empty can, then wash the gun out, and put the thinners into the same can, and use that for thinning more primer or topcoat if you are washing topcoat out. Also disconnect the pressure and squeeze the trigger to allow the paint in the mixing chamber to drain back into the cup. Both paint and thinner are expensive, waste as little as possible, and use a cheap gunwash thinner to clean the equipment after all the best thinner and paint are removed. She's looking good!
 

HRgx

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I saw a fully restored Monarch 10EE on Pinterest. It's the red one. The fellow laid some pin striping on it. I do think he went a little overboard with the pin stripes. However, if you did some tasteful and not too busy pin striping, I think that it would look real nice. Just my opinion but whatever you decide, it's gonna be a show piece.
 

Mr Mike

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Provided you paint is not a two pack type, you can drain the thinned primer back into an empty can, then wash the gun out, and put the thinners into the same can, and use that for thinning more primer or topcoat if you are washing topcoat out. Also disconnect the pressure and squeeze the trigger to allow the paint in the mixing chamber to drain back into the cup. Both paint and thinner are expensive, waste as little as possible, and use a cheap gunwash thinner to clean the equipment after all the best thinner and paint are removed. She's looking good!
Hello hermetic, I used a professional water based product, And sprayed it with an airless machine so I wouldn't need to thin the primer or paint.
I didn't use the pressure pot sprayer with this painting system, The airless uses a short 25' foot hose that takes about 2 cups to fill by its self, when I clean it out I spray about half that back into the paint can befor the soapy water gets up to the spray gun.

The paint and primer were about 50.00 a Gallon each so they are a bit pricey, lets hope the paint lives up to its cost. Thanks so much for trying to help out thou...

PaintAndPrimerLabel.jpg
PaintAndPrimer.jpg
 

Mr Mike

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I saw a fully restored Monarch 10EE on Pinterest. It's the red one. The fellow laid some pin stripping on it. I do think he went a little overboard with the pin strips. However, if you did some tasteful and not too busy pin stripping, I think that it would look real nice. Just my opinion but whatever you decide, it's gonna be a show piece.
Hi HRgx..

Funny you should mention the pin striping.. I was thinking of doing something along them lines but decided against it. I was also considering having an airbrush artist paint some Rack and Pinion Gears in some complicated manner on the lathe bed, at one point I was even thinking Star Wars Storm Trooper even.

In the end I decided I'm going for a factory fresh Machine Tool look with some highlights on the Lathe Bed, Carriage, Compound slide and Tailstock handles. If I was going with some striping a couple Dark Gray strips on the white bed supports would look neat, but it would ruin the clean look I'm shooting for.

Thanks for the input though, Mike.
 

Mr Mike

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The cabinets came out excellent.. The additional effort with prep work made all the difference in the outcome, Just the Interior painting is left.
It took between 3 and 4 hrs per cabinet Inside and out to Grind, Scrape & Sand off the old paint, Key scratches in the base metal and remove the rust to a smooth surface using a pneumatic orbital sander & about 40 sheets of sand paper.

The Chip Pan took less time maybe 1.5 hrs of original prepping and another hour to sand off the bad paint job - but finally did come out pretty good after the painting issues were solved. Allot of time was wasted, maybe 5 or 6 hrs with drive time working out the paint issues that I was having from the start of this project.. I had no luck with spraying the solvent based paints trying several methods and ended up using a water based system at double the cost. I just hope the paint is as tough as its price tag.

The Pre-Prep work of creating and remaking the gantry & hoist, and making the tee stands took about 6 hrs. about two hrs of spray equipment cleanup including failed attempts - lets say for everything a total of 22 hrs to get the Chip Pan and Pedestals painted.

lol because I used an airless sprayer the total time I spent painting was under 12 minutes. I used a stop watch to time myself on the final coat of Dark Gray on the large pedestal at 1 minute 24 seconds. I really wanted to learn to use a solvent paint but sometimes you have to go with what you know to get things moving.

3Shot.jpg

Wet paint Just sprayed, would have been nice all glossy. Paint prep is everything.
WetPaintGray.jpg

The flashed off paint shows the final semi gloss sheen, and factory fresh paint look.
DryPaintGray.jpg

Cabinets are dry to the touch, Thanks to the hoist I could lower them down and move them without a scratch.
Now I just need some courage not to touch them for at least week, then ill finish the interiors and reassemble whats ready.
BothPaintedGray.jpg

Thanks for looking.. Mike.
 
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larry4406

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This is a net project you have undertaken! Lots of diversions along the way - electrolysis, painting, restoration, and in the end a machine you will know in and out!
 

Mr Mike

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This is a net project you have undertaken! Lots of diversions along the way - electrolysis, painting, restoration, and in the end a machine you will know in and out!
Hi Larry, yes lots of diversions.. I originally wasn't intending on this restore becoming a net thing, I was just going to restore it and post the before and after photos. I would always do the best I could regardless of postings, I would have done everything as I've done so far.. with the exception of the electrolysis which I'm glade I learned how to do, It will come in handy down the road with this project.

I asked before I started if I should just do the before and after photos, Or a full beginning to end write up, a few people said a full write up with lots of photos. so here I am. I thought maybe I would be helping others by showing how I am doing it but it been going both ways. who knows maybe it will help someone avoid my mistakes and or find some info useful.
 
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RandyM

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Mike you are doing a great job, not only with the restoration of your lathe, but the documentation of it in this thread. Not everyone takes the large amounts of time to take pictures, load them to the site and then describe everything. We are all very grateful of your efforts and appreciative of your unselfishness to being willing to help us all learn and enjoy your fun. Thank you!
 

Mr Mike

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Mike you are doing a great job, not only with the restoration of your lathe, but the documentation of it in this thread. Not everyone takes the large amounts of time to take pictures, load them to the site and then describe everything. We are all very grateful of your efforts and appreciative of your unselfishness to being willing to help us all learn and enjoy your fun. Thank you!
Thanks for the kind words Randy. I'm glade I found this forum I wasn't complaining, There are so many nice folks here sharing their knowledge with everyone. I highly doubt anyone will learn anything new from this thread but the documentation is still important with tons of photos that can be used in the future by others trying to Id and locate missing parts from their Logan 1875, I don't mind contributing and helping where I can.

The world would be a better place if it operated like this forum, Kick out the all the haters and everyone share info freely.

Thanks Mike.
 

Mr Mike

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Ok so while I'm waiting for paint to cure for the next week or so, its time to play mad scientist starting with the Tailstock, Yup Electrolytic rust removal. I don't do videos often but I may do one on electrolytic rust removal because while there are many videos out there on the subject, there lacking details that would be useful. I'm am by no means a wiz on the subject, but I have electronic tools that can shed some light on what is going on and how to control it.

I believe I have the science down pretty good, Its gotten to the point with all the testing.. lots and lots of testing that I can tell when the parts are done without having to pull the part to visibly check it, Now I'm working on the what If's - Like what if all the rust has been removed and something comes up and you forget and leave the part cooking on High or Low current for an extended period. that kinda stuff.

The problem is videos take allot of time, energy, and expertise to be of good quality, along with a good setup which I don't have. Not to mention I don't have that camera friendly look or audio voice, I actually began making a video once on how to convert an upright golden tee video game cabinet into the much more popular pedestal type but never finished the video because I didn't want to be seen in it so I created it all graphically and It just takes me to long.

The video below took over 8+ hrs, To create a mere 48 second video - I literally tried my best to make a cool video that would be fun to watch.. I re-created the terminator effect as part of the intro, After the intro it was going to be lots of photos with a voice-over explaining the whole conversion process... I started putting the photos in order ( I had Hundreds of photos ) and editing scenes together and when playing back the video checking for errors in the sections, I realized I don't have a good video sounding voice either, so I gave up. I may or may not be willing.. we'll see.


On the plus side Ive been a busy beaver working on the tail stock.. I tore it down and am currently removing rust, the fun way. I'll post Pic's when I have the electrolysis done. I also need to order the 2 part rubber to make the motor mount bushings and order the Leg levelers for the cabinets.

After the tail stock I'll start on the scary part.. The spindle head & bearings, The scary part is if I mess a gear or something important up - I'm going to cry my eyes out because I don't have the skill to make a part and or it will be really hard to replace. So ya I'm gonna be real careful like and may need advice. Thanks for looking - Mike.

Sneek Peak..
Its possible to remove the rust and leave the intact paint using electrolysis if needed. This tail-stock Handle was in the electrolysis bath for 4 Hrs, The water was already clear of rust an hour earlier but I didn't think to pull the handle out, it was cooking off additional paint while I was creating this post..

I was thinking of polishing it and spraying a clear coat over the original paint and keeping this handle as the only original part for the nostalgia. Ill pay more attention to the compound slide handle and run it in the tank alone, This handle is going back in to remove the rest of the paint. I have some other cool stuff to show that we will get to later.

TailStockHandleFrontWithRust.jpg
TailStockHandleBackNoRust.jpg
TailStockHandleFrontNoRust.jpg
 
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Mr Mike

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All the rust and paint have been removed from the Tailstock handle, time to polish it up before painting the center.

TailStockHandleFrontPolished.jpg

Caution.. Do not buff or polish any metal that requires dimensional accuracy..!
Polishing metal is just like sanding wood, you are removing surface material.

If your interested.. here is what I used to polish up this tailstock handle.

Everything pictured above is from Harbor Freight.
Central Machinery bench buffer - Item# 61557 - it worked great. $45.00
Three buffing compounds - Black , Gray and Green. $4.99 ea.

If you never polished metal before - the right way to do it is sand the part with 320 grit sand paper to remove tiny nicks and smooth out the surface then use 400 grit paper to remove the 320 grit scratches and so on.. continuing on with then next highest grit through to 600, If you really want a mirror finish then use 800, 1000, 1200 and you will have an amazing mirror finish when your done.

After the metal is all sanded you then polish the part starting with the black polishing compound - like sand paper but having finer abrasives.. some of the abrasive compounds are better suited to different metals - the ones pictured above are for steel. just think of the black as being a fine abrasive, the gray a super fine and the green an ultra fine..

There are lots of videos on you tube - watch a few then grab your stuff, something to practice on like a spoon from the kitchen drawer and polish it.
you'll be a pro in no time, The bottom side of spoons are a good start because they usually have very fine scratches that will just polish out without sanding.

A pretty good video to watch about polishing procedures is from Eastwood, goes into detail about it.

Have fun.. Mike.

Electrolysis using a glass tank - Which I do not recommend, If it breaks.. Ouch
GlassTankTailstockAndHandle.jpg

De-Rusting tailstock handle. Note there are fewer bubbles in painted areas.
The tank is running just strait tap water, No washing soda, @ 8 Amps.
GlassTankTailstockHandle.jpg

Rust and paint removed over night, then scrubbed with an ultra fine Scotch Bright pad.
TailstockHandleAfterElectrolysis.jpg

All polished up to a semi gloss finish like the rest of the machine. About 30 Minutes work.
TailstockHandleAfterPolishing.jpg

Taped off and ready for paint, I used electrical tape for flexibility.
TailstockHandleTapedUp.jpg

I sprayed both sides with one coat each of primer, paint and matt clear coat 15 min apart.
TailstockHandlePainted.jpg

After removing the tape I used acetone to clean the paint from the polished areas, looks pretty snazzy..!
TailstockHandleCompleted.jpg

It looks much better with the paint dry - before and after shot... I need to find a coating to protect the polished surface
from future rust... Anyone have some tried and true options..?
TailStockHandleFrontWithRust.jpg TailstockHandleDone.jpg
 
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Mr Mike

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Lots of rust removal is going on with the tailstock and components getting them ready for paint.

I started on the two large tailstock parts but found I was not able to get the Amps up even with washing soda because my anodes were inadequate. So I built some new ones for the small tank I am using to add more surface area, The new anodes work like a charm.

Even with a whole cup of washing soda the amps maxed out at 2.04.
ElectrolysisTailStock.jpg

Even thou the parts were cooking over night there was still some paint left scattered about.
ElectrolysisTailStockLower.jpg
ElectrolysisTailStockUpper.jpg

I welded up two new anode sides
ElectrolysisWeldNewAnodes.jpg

I put the Large tailstock parts back into the tank to remove the rest of the paint & rust.
GlassTankTailstockAndHandle.jpg

Without any washing soda I was able to get the amps up.. Note the AC only clamp shows about
half of the actual amps being drawn by the tank.
ElectrolysisWeldNewAnodesAmps.jpg

Everything is moving along nicely..! most all the tailstock parts are done..
ElectrolysisTailStockParts2.jpg

I left the clamping plate as I found it with accumulated caked on oils and dirt to see what effect
it will have with the electrolysis.
ElectrolysisTailStockParts.jpg

I'll be plenty busy this weekend tearing stuff apart getting lots of parts ready for electrolysis...
 
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HRgx

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Mr Mike, your work, patience, perseverance and attention to detail continues to amaze me. I can't wait to see the finish product, but don't rush it as too am patient. :)
 

Mr Mike

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Mr Mike, your work, patience, perseverance and attention to detail continues to amaze me. I can't wait to see the finish product, but don't rush it as too am patient. :)
Hi HRgx...
Your gonna have to stop with the compliments... your making me blush. :)

Here is a sneak peek to wet your whistle, I'm thinking about replace some of the original
cabinet and bed support fasteners with stainless steel ones.
SneekPeek1.jpg SneekPeek2.jpg
 
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Mr Mike

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The Tailstock and parts are all cleaned bagged and put away..
If you look closely at the tailstock bed clamp you'll notice its filthy covered in grim, electrolysis
ate right through it but didn't have enough time to eat all the paint off.

I just have to say thanks to everyone that suggested electrolytic rust removal when I started
this project, Its been a life saver..

Most everything here but the Quill could have been cleaned with a wire wheel or EvapOrust
but the tank was ready after removing the upper and lower tailstock, and electrolysis removes
everything down to clean metal, Less work for me.
TailStockPartsRusted.jpg

After pulling the upper and lower tailstock and components from the tank I used Scotch Bright
to shine everything and get it ready for paint.
TailStockParts.jpg

Everything came out excellent.
ElectrolysisTailStockLowerDone.jpg

I need to see if these 1/4" ball oilers are available before I attempt to extract them.
ElectrolysisTailStockUpperDone.jpg

Next on my cleaning list, Is the Headstock... 20 bucks says I put it back together, and then I
realize its missing the belts.. That would be so like me to do that.
HeadstockRusted.jpg

Till next time...
 
Last edited:

Nogoingback

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Hi HRgx...
Your gonna have to stop with the compliments... your making me blush. :)

Here is a sneak peek to wet your whistle, I'm thinking about replace some of the original
cabinet and bed support fasteners with stainless steel ones.
View attachment 247230





View attachment 247231
If I didn't know better I would swear you were painting a car rather than a machine tool. When you're finished will you be willing to slather it in chips and oil? Looks great!
 
Container Above bottom breadcrumb