1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. PLEASE: Read the FORUM RULES BEFORE registering!

    Dismiss Notice

Goofs & Blunders You Should Avoid.

Discussion in 'GOOFS & BLUNDERS YOU SHOULD AVOID!' started by David S, Jul 24, 2016.

  1. Christian Poulsen

    Christian Poulsen United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    44
    Trophy Points:
    28
    City:
    Arvada
    State:
    Colorado

    -Return to Top-

    Oh I get it KI LOL (actually though, over decades, it's perty' much a given that one is gonna' work next to some that their "hands just don't fit the handles", so it's always good to learn how to duck! LOL
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2016
  2. Wreck™Wreck

    Wreck™Wreck United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    1,110
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Riverton
    State:
    New Jersey

    -Return to Top-

    When turning parts to within .010" of the hard chuck jaws do not forget that you have faced .020" from the length and set Z zero there.

    Did this last week, fortunately I always run the first part slowly with a finger on the feed hold button and only scagged an insert when the tool hit the jaws.

    Brain fade
     
    BGHansen and kingmt01 like this.
  3. mephits

    mephits United States Iron Registered Member

    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    3
    City:
    Memphis
    State:
    Tennessee

    -Return to Top-

    I grew up around blacksmithing. Dad put me on blower duty at the ripe old age of 7 (as soon as I was big enough to crank the forge blower) and by 10 or 12 I was swinging my own hammer. At about 15, I knew I'd seen it all and knew how to do everything! As a seasoned metalsmithing pro, I'd just finished forging this nifty tanto-shaped blade. Now it's time to fit the handle (stacked leather disks with brass bolster and butt). In preparation, I'm cleaning up and squaring off the tang with an angle grinder; the knife held firmly in a leg vice. It looks great and I know I've got it made. I turn off the grinder, wait for it to spin down (for safety!), set it down, and grab hold of the tang of the knife...

    You know, it's funny how the really, really hot things feel cold and slippery. The cold is because the nerves are misfiring as they die from the heat and the slippery is from your own skin melting. I melted the fingerprints off the first four fingers of my left hand with that little "oops." Couldn't touch anything for days and didn't get the fingerprints back for about six weeks. I still have that knife, though. Holds a right fine edge. I guess I made a pleasing offering of pain to the metal gods.

    Never forget that grinding adds huge amounts of heat to your workpiece or that steel doesn't glow until about 900 degrees fahrenheit!
    --
    Hurley in Memphis
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2016
  4. Tony Wells

    Tony Wells United States Vice President Staff Member Administrator

    Likes Received:
    19,270
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Tyler, Texas
    City:
    Tyler
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    I don't think it's been mentioned, but get your tetanus shots when due. Might keep you out of a lot of trouble.
     
    jpfabricator likes this.
  5. kvt

    kvt Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    516
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    San Antonio
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    That reminds me that I am probably due, or over due for some. When I was active duty any time I went in for anything and they saw the cuts etc, They would just give me one as a precaution.
     
  6. Groundhog

    Groundhog United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    183
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Salina
    State:
    Kansas

    -Return to Top-

    Tetanus vaccinations are not without risks, some severe. My favorite aunt died a painful death from Guillain-Barre syndrome that was caused by the tetanus vaccination. Other reactions are more common than you think (paralysis, seizures). I still get tetanus shots, but not indiscriminately, I make sure I am due for one and definitely not "just for precaution".
     
  7. Tony Wells

    Tony Wells United States Vice President Staff Member Administrator

    Likes Received:
    19,270
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Tyler, Texas
    City:
    Tyler
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    Like many things, they are a means of risk management. It's true there could be adverse side effects (as with most any medical treatment), and you should not take them indiscriminately. But in our line of work (or hobby) there are definite risks of infections that are non issues if we are current on our shots. It is a personal decision, of course, but the generally accepted reasoning is that the risk of side effects is low in comparison to the risk of serious consequences resulting from an infection that would have been prevented by the shot. I've been taking them since I went into this line of work, every 10 years I believe.
     
    bobshobby and savarin like this.
  8. brino

    brino Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    2,014
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Almonte
    State:
    Ontario

    -Return to Top-

    Just today, I remembered one that had slipped my mind......

    I was doing some woodworking in my multi-use shop and noticed that saw dust from cutting or sanding was building up on my new MIG welder.
    Well I can't have that....so I looked around and there was some vapour barrier left over from a recent renovation.
    Using nothing more than scissors and a stapler, I made a very serviceable dust cover. It worked a treat.

    Days later I needed to weld something. I try to be careful about any flammables including saw-dust etc. so after a good vacuuming I pulled the dust cover off the MIG machine put it aside and continued the welding project. Part way thru and out of the corner of my mask I saw some "moving light"......what was that?

    Some sparks had hit the vapour barrier and set it on fire!
    I must say I was surprised by how well that plastic sheet supported a flame. It would burn, drip flaming goo, and both the fresh edge and goo continued to burn.

    Hmmmm, we build houses with this? Sure it's behind the sheet-rock fire barrier, but once a fire gets in the walls, look out!

    I guess I need a big piece of leather for a spark-proof dust cover.......

    -brino
     
  9. Groundhog

    Groundhog United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    183
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Salina
    State:
    Kansas

    -Return to Top-

    You would think vapor barrier would be flame resistant. That's kinda scary.
     
    brino likes this.
  10. Wreck™Wreck

    Wreck™Wreck United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    1,110
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Riverton
    State:
    New Jersey

    -Return to Top-

    Chip control or a lack thereof, did a bunch of parts in 303 SS from 3 1/2" diameter stock in a 3 jaw chuck, when roughing the chips came off in small C shaped bits, this was excellent.
    The finish cut was a nightmare however, the chip would not break in this material, it coiled a single strand around the part, tool and chuck.
    Ran the next one and went to get a cup of coffee, the chips wound around the chuck jaws in an epic birds nest and turned all of the lock line coolant components into little blue and orange plastic bits.
     
  11. kvt

    kvt Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    516
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    San Antonio
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    Ok, you went to get a cup of coffee. Glad I do not drink the stuff.
     
    4gsr likes this.
  12. Wreck™Wreck

    Wreck™Wreck United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    1,110
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Riverton
    State:
    New Jersey

    -Return to Top-

    CNC lathe, it will run all day without input, sometimes the chips between material production runs will cause problems however. It is best to run several parts whilst adjusting the feeds and DOC's in order to get the chips under control, once this is done let it eat, the next bar may be different.
     
  13. 4gsr

    4gsr Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    1,688
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Victoria, Texas
    City:
    Victoria
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    Try to trepanning or ejector drilling a hole in a 30 foot bar of 303 SS sometime.
     
  14. kingmt01

    kingmt01 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    205
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Huntington
    State:
    West Virginia

    -Return to Top-

    Speaking of welding. I laid my phone down better then arms reach & a couple feet above where I was welding. When I finished there was a few chips melted into the glass. I flaked them off thinking that isn't to bad. However within days I had cracks running all over the screen.
     
  15. Tony Wells

    Tony Wells United States Vice President Staff Member Administrator

    Likes Received:
    19,270
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Tyler, Texas
    City:
    Tyler
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    Watch where your grinding sparks go if you are using a hand held angle grinder. If, like some of you, you share your shop with your wife's garage, those little sparks will embed in the glass of the windows and windshield. On the windshield (or windscreen for you other blokes) they are hard on the wiper blades.
     
  16. paulinlapine

    paulinlapine United States Iron Registered Member

    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    3
    City:
    La Pine
    State:
    Oregon

    -Return to Top-

    I have worn eyeglasses for 50+ years and credit them for still having eyesight at all, since I'm lax on using safety goggles and such. When doing grinding I'd get the tiny pit marks in the glass lenses. Who'd think the hot sparks would pit glass? Odd think is, the last 10 years or so, I have had my lenses made from polycarbonate plastic. I haven't had a pit mark in my lenses since. Who knew?
     
  17. kvt

    kvt Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    516
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    San Antonio
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    Those sparks can set clothes to smoldering. Tennis shoes, pant leg, etc. Watch where the sparks are hitting, They may not seem that bad but as you grind they continue to build in spots.
    And like Tony said if you share your work area with others, or even other things like wood working, be careful. The saw dust can be a ready fire starter, Have seen those results in one garage shop,
    keep the fire extinguisher handy.
     
  18. savarin

    savarin Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    1,634
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Townsville

    -Return to Top-

    :laughing: been there, done that, it hurts before you realise whats happening.
     
  19. kingmt01

    kingmt01 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    205
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Huntington
    State:
    West Virginia

    -Return to Top-

    I've never seen it for myself but I remember a story about a table saw being used for cutting steel & apparently pine dust is much like gasoline.
     
  20. Superburban

    Superburban United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    133
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Grand Junction
    State:
    Colorado

    -Return to Top-

    Much worse. Even many things that are not flammable can be explosive when in dust form. We did all kinds of experiments trying to use dust as an explosive multiplier. While it could do a tremendous job, we could not get it consistent or predictable.
     
  21. bfd

    bfd United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    144
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    nipomo
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    savarin, what did the spark sound like? I'm sorry but as I type this I am laughing. this is one thing I can learn from others. thanks bill
     
  22. bfd

    bfd United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    144
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    nipomo
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    I laugh every time I read your post sorry but I can just imagine what it felt like.
     
  23. bfd

    bfd United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    144
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    nipomo
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    I had trouble with my enco lathe spindle d1-6 would not close down tight on the tapered spindle face combo. so I was bluing the taper section to find the problem. I had taken my backing plate to work to see if it would fit. It worked on the leblond d1-6 spindle perfectly. so I determined that the spindle nose was too large. so I was stoning it down and blue checking the fit I was not locking the cams while I was blue checking the fit. slid the chuck on got interrupted and came back and turned on the lathe. then realized the chuck was in but not locked down as I stayed away I watched the chuck slowly work its way out. boy was that stupid. as the chuck finally let go hit the ways and bounced to the floor I stayed back and waited for it to stop about 20 feet away from my lathe. no real damage except to the concrete floor ( big divot). ways ok chuck scratched but ok. me ok and slightly less stupid got the chuck to fit ok after lots of emery cloth and stoning bill
     
  24. Tony Wells

    Tony Wells United States Vice President Staff Member Administrator

    Likes Received:
    19,270
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Tyler, Texas
    City:
    Tyler
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    Bill, chances are that you could have adjusted the pins and got a lock on it. They are designed to be moved in or our a turn at a time, while using the socket cap screws right beside them to clock them. The tapers on most machines are very close, but of course practical manufacturing allows for variations. Hence the adjustments possible. But as long as you got it on there and are happy with the fit, great!
     
  25. savarin

    savarin Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    1,634
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Townsville

    -Return to Top-

    It was sparks from an angle grinder burning into the groin area that eventually burnt through.
    The language was a tad loud and harsh :devil:
     
  26. Tony Wells

    Tony Wells United States Vice President Staff Member Administrator

    Likes Received:
    19,270
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Tyler, Texas
    City:
    Tyler
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    The problem with pine sawdust is that the pitch or resin in pine contains the basic source of turpentine, or at least live trees do. It is distilled on a commercial basis, but I wold imagine there is enough of the raw materials in pine, even dried, to pose a flammability problem.
     
  27. mephits

    mephits United States Iron Registered Member

    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    3
    City:
    Memphis
    State:
    Tennessee

    -Return to Top-

    It's not shop related, but I can also say that you should be very wary of fires when you're wearing wool pants. That's another of those stupid teenager tricks I was so good at. At about the age of 13 at a freezing-cold, very windy February campout, I had planted myself downwind of the camp fire happily warming myself. I was quite startled and more than a little angry when my father tackled me from offsides and threw me to the ground unexpectedly. Upon my less-than-charitably asking just why he'd done such a thing, his only response was to point at my shins. I realized that the fronts of the legs of my heavy wool army-surplus pants were burned away over half-way up said shins and I'd never felt a thing! Oops...
     
  28. Round in circles

    Round in circles United Kingdom Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    157
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Caerbryn Ammanford

    -Return to Top-

    Mt



    Swarf ...the bane of a machinists life .

    Never ever use an airline to blow it away or clean the lathe for your likely to get blinded or impaled by the tiny high speed razor sharp bits of turned off metals your blowing around .

    Always use the power off kill switch to ensure the machine cannot be accidentally turned on during cleaning operations .. never ever clean a turning machine or remove swarf from one , its far too dangerous.


    TIP.
    My pal has put a rather strong toroidal/ doughnut magnet ( taken out of an old scrapped microwave oven ) into a home made can using 3 inch dia thin wall aluminium tube & an end plate " Tigged " on all the way round the joint .

    The magnet is glued to a pull lever which has an end disc / flange of aluminium screwed onto the end so it looks a bit like one of the caulking guns you use to put sealant on out of a plastic tube .
    The rod runs up the inside center of the can .

    Between the magnet & the top of the can is soft 6 inch long compression spring over the pull rod . At the very top of the can is a light steel cross brace with a central hole in it .
    The pull rod pokes up out this hole & the top end has been shaped to form a finger grip for four fingers .

    Riveted to the top outside of the can above the furthest reach of the pull rod is a simple inverted " U " shape flat bar handle 3 mm thick x 13 mm wide .
    Run a two inch wide strip of quality industrial grade sticky plastic tape round the can about 3 inches up from the base of the can , if it's placed thoughtfully it will indicate the average area of attraction to the ferrous material when it's at rest down a the bottom end of the tube .

    To quickly & safely collect the smaller ferrous swarf you put the magnet end of the aluminium can over the swarf area & it picks it up . If you have birds nests of turnings then why not make yourself a swarf hook / scraper off device ? Make it out of some 3 mm thick x 13 mm wide by 22 inches long flat steel /stainless steel bar & make a formed ring at the opposite end to the 3" "L " shaped hook to hand it up by .

    Move it over to the waste bucket , one handedly pull the lever with the magnet on it up & the swarf falls off the aluminium case & lower side of the can . Release your grip & the spring pushes the magnet back to theh bottom of the aluminium can ready for the next go .


    Store this magnetic swarf picker up / collector anywhere that has a steel surface to stick it to , for it is magnetic after all .
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2016
    Randall Marx likes this.
  29. kvt

    kvt Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    516
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    San Antonio
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    Savarin, At least mine was just a shoe, that started to smolder a bit.
    Not machine related per say, but in the Texas panhandle where I grew up one of the things that always had to watch out for when working on equipment in an grain elevator was the dust, It blew out the side of the elevator, derailed a train, and killed a few just because the guy got lazy and did not grease the bearings on the conveyer properly, or at least that is what they said happened after a long investigation.
    So yea, dust can be very explosive
     
  30. jocat54

    jocat54 Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    190
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Lindale, Texas
    City:
    Lindale
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    Lots of things are flammable in a dust or powder form----try a little coffee creamer powder--burns well
     

Share This Page