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Goofs & Blunders You Should Avoid.

Discussion in 'GOOFS & BLUNDERS YOU SHOULD AVOID!' started by David S, Jul 24, 2016.

  1. dieselshadow

    dieselshadow United States Do you smell something? H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Was there an Alligator in your lathe?
     
  2. aametalmaster

    aametalmaster H-M Supporter - Premium Content Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    There sure was. Was thinking Happy Gillmore...Bob
     
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  3. RJSakowski

    RJSakowski H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    My first job out of college was working as an analytical chemist. Some of the chemical analyses involved ashing samples at 1200ºC in platinum crucibles. When removing one from the muffle furnace, it slipped out of the tongs. The crucibles were quite expensive and dropping one to the floor would ruin it so I instinctively stuck my hand out and bounced the glowing crucible onto the counter. Fortunately when it hit my hand, it was upside down and I only suffered a thin ring of a burn. It would have been much different had it hit right side up.

    BTW, I use the foot catch trick as well. Old habits are hard to break. :face slap:
     
  4. Groundhog

    Groundhog United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    About 25 years ago I used the "capture between your arm and side" method when I dropped one of the kitchen knifes out of a set in a dark hardware store. I was holding it up to the light so I could see it better. After pulling an inch of steel out of my arm, and with my girlfriend applying pressure I paid for the knife set, then got a bunch of stitches. I still have the scar and the knife set, but not the girlfriend.
     
  5. savarin

    savarin Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    My favourite trick when I started my trade was removing a large copper pan with brass handles from a very hot oven with cloths, then tucking said cloths into my apron and using a bare hand to remove the lid, also with brass handles.
    Usually it was so hot my palm would skid over the brass with a hissing noise searing the palm. It stung like hell, the air turned blue but never raised a blister, sort of branded the palm.
    The other thing with knives we were always taught to jump back if a knife fell off the bench.
    I still do this to this day automatically if I drop something.
     
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  6. Groundhog

    Groundhog United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I do now!
     
  7. silence dogood

    silence dogood United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I wonder if the employees jump back if they drop a knife at the Buck Knife Company. However, if you are ever in Post Falls, Idaho, get a tour of the company. They will give you a list of rules that you must follow such as wearing shoes not flipflops, no pets, etc. The last sentence is "After all this is a knife factory". Also the tour is free. Well, sort of, you will find yourself buying a knife like we did after the tour is over with.
     
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  8. Groundhog

    Groundhog United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Shoot, I didn't know Buck was in Post Falls. I lived in Idaho 15 years and took motorcycle trips almost every nice weather weekend. Would have been a nice place to go to.
     
  9. silence dogood

    silence dogood United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Buck Knife moved from San Diego Ca. in 2005. At the tour, the guide explained that Kalifornia was getting hard to do business in. So it was either have the Chinese make the knives (which they did for a while in order to keep up the demand) or move. The problem with the Chinese is that Buck did not like their steel, besides they real wanted to stay in the US. By the way their steel either comes from Ohio or Sweden.
     
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  10. CluelessNewB

    CluelessNewB Active Resistor H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Don't install the spindle and back gears on your Atlas mill without putting the belt on first. DUH!
     
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  11. kvt

    kvt Active User Active Member

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    For those of you who work on old cars, If you are working on the window rollers in an old car door, with your arm in the door be careful how you pull it out. That old car door can be very sharp. They did not have the same old safety rounded edges like they do now. After a bunch of stitches, and some healed tendon sheathes the spot can still bother you. bad thing is once is not bad enough then I had to try with the other arm. Boy was the wife upset.
     
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  12. jpfabricator

    jpfabricator United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I think some car manufacturers had a honing room to send stuff to if it wasent sharp enough.

    Sent from somwhere in east Texas by Jake!
     
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  13. Randall Marx

    Randall Marx United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Sounds about right! Never got stiches because of the car door, but have been cut pretty badly a few times working on old junk.
     
  14. Randall Marx

    Randall Marx United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Reminds me of another one...the warning stamped into the radiator cap about it being hot is no joke!
     
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  15. cs900

    cs900 United States maker of chips Active Member

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    anyone who's worked on cars has a story or two. speaking of sharp sheet metal, I was taking the sunroof assembly out of my RX7, or at least trying. Had all the bolts out and the darn thing wouldn't come out, until I tried to look at what was holding it up. you guessed it, finally let free and smacked me right in the head. For note, I have learned from my previous mentioned stories and WAS wearing safety glasses!

    Also more fun car stories, I was replacing the strut on one of my old RX7s (yes I have an obsession with those as well), and decided to jack the rear of the car up on the bottom of the strut...not sure what I was thinking, but of course I wasn't using jack stands and as soon as I got the bolt out holding the strut to the car the strut compressed and the back of the car fell on top of me and bounced off the top of my chest. Thank god for the strut bump stops! I now use jack stands ALL the time now too.
     
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  16. Christian Poulsen

    Christian Poulsen United States Active Member Active Member

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    ...don't feed the mice (they can set up inside your wire EDM cabinet and chew)... And DO put $ in a retirement fund (hopefully a 401K that your employer matches some % Early retirement here when 55 yrs old and lovin' every minute of it!! (55(and still alive) + 35 yrs of it chewing up metal = the ("our") rule of 90 = yeah boyz!!!
     
  17. Christian Poulsen

    Christian Poulsen United States Active Member Active Member

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    ...always (always!) stop that lathe spindle when peeling off (grabbing with your gloves, pliers, "coat hanger") a rats nest of stringy chips (like from turning stringy CRS) IE: Don't learn the hard way with a nasty cut (or worse!)
     
  18. CluelessNewB

    CluelessNewB Active Resistor H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Never pull one of those plastic wire ties tight with pliers toward your face.
     
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  19. Tony Wells

    Tony Wells United States Vice President Staff Member Administrator

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    Especially those from HF after they get a little old.
     
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  20. Christian Poulsen

    Christian Poulsen United States Active Member Active Member

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    3 true stories over 35 yrs:

    ...I once (that's all it took) in the 70's learned why a correct machine shop floor plan has their line of lathes with each set at about a 30 degree angle with only wall in line with the spindles and why yoose' shouldn't stand in direct line with a spinning chuck! (with or without a part in it)... luckily just cut up lips, a bkn nose, and of course 2 black eyes....

    ... are any any of you guys (and gals) familiar with rolls of 2" wide abrasive (sandpaper, various grits)?...anyway, we had a H.S. METAL SHOP TEACHER! hired on temp. for the summer...his 1st week in June he tore off a long length, wrapped it around a big OD and long work piece in our big American Pacemaker (to "sand" and "even out" the diameter to print), he wrapped the paper around his wrists while griping (top and bottom ends) of it while manipulating it back and forth along the spinning part while pulling hard....anyway, I got all this from seeing the accident report (I didn't see the carnage but I heard "it")...I later heard he got out of the hospital weeks later and he didn't loose his hands or arm(s)...

    ...the worst (a death) in one of "our" production depts. on a swing shift: It is said (guessed) the operator, with door open, had his upper torso inside a CNC (MS) lathe, with the safety micro switch switch taped while doing some hand radius work ("polishing", sanding...with paper again)...no one knows if he reached around to the control and hit the cycle start button by mistake or what but a 3/4" (mighta' been a 5/8") boring bar went through his head as the cycle started and finished leaving his tore up body hanging on the tool change magazine...2 of my friends (a set up man and a programmer in that dept.) and a couple of others released the tool (boring bar) and carried him down to the main 1st aid room to wait for the ambulance (all in that dept. were offered counseling if they chose)

    Sorry for the bummer but I tell these on every machining site I venture in to (Be careful (smart) out there)
     
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  21. Wreck™Wreck

    Wreck™Wreck United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Always remember which side of the parting tool is Z 0.000
     
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  22. Groundhog

    Groundhog United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    "Always remember which side of the parting tool is Z 0.000"

    With me it is usually the other side.
     
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  23. atunguyd

    atunguyd South Africa Active User Active Member

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    Christian can you elaborate on your first story. For us ignorant youngsters please?

    I assume the chuck came off while spinning?

    Sent from my SM-N920C using Tapatalk
     
  24. Christian Poulsen

    Christian Poulsen United States Active Member Active Member

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    Sure my friend (and I was just beginning the trade (as an operator) too back then...the pallet was loaded with a batch of simple unfired ceramic parts about 9" OD by 3/8" thick with about a 1/2" hole in the middle that were flat on one side...my secondary operation was to turn the OD and face the "thickness" on the "bad side" to print...But guess what?! The set up was a "vacume" chuck set up to suck those flat sides in and hold while turning (I thinks' you can picture the rest?!)...All the supervisor said and wrote up was that I shoundt' been standing right in line with the spinning chuck (LOL)....Later years, during my Apprenticeship is when I learned and read other basic safety thangs' like that and like never have/leave a chuck wrench or key in chuck without your hands on it...or never file without a handle on it (IE on a lathe too many guys have ended up with the tang sticking through their hand (etc.)
    Another story is a guy in our shop reversed the spindle on a Hardinge HLV Toolroom lathe but didn't "turn" the chuck (for the "pin in groove" spindle nose (whatever it is called) mounting system) for that reverse direction, he took a cut and the chuck came flying off (but he was standing enough to the side towards the tail stock correctly and the lathes were all at an angle so it just crunched into the drywall instead of nailing me at the lathe right in front of him)
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2016
  25. Christian Poulsen

    Christian Poulsen United States Active Member Active Member

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    Uh oh, now you got me reminiscing/thinking (Hey! I heard that!)...Another example why to stand to the side of a turning lathe spindle/chuck: Even in our Machine Shop/Tool and Die/Mold (around 90% "one offs" ("make 1 that will make hundreds or thousands")..."Luckily the Programmer/Machinist was standing to the side when our big blue CNC Slant Turn Mazak let go of about a 2 ft long by 12" OD hunk of Alum. at high RPM (Yes, facing was done, tailstock and live center was into the center, and the chuck end of the stock was back against it (the chuck).. (too big of a cut was surmised)...anyway, it came through the door taking the door with it smashing into and taking out the top drawers of its (the Zak's) tooling cabinet that was about 4 ft in front of "Big Blue" (Besides waking up the shop, it woke up every dept in the building!)
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2016
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  26. kingmt01

    kingmt01 United States Active Member Active Member

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    I don't think I want to stand in a shop beside you.
     
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  27. Christian Poulsen

    Christian Poulsen United States Active Member Active Member

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    LOL kingmt01! But read my previous posts for content....except for a few stringy chip cuts and that round that flew off that vacuum chuck and smacked me in the face whan I was a 20 yr old "newbe" in the 70's, none of my examples (posts) were moi. (But yes, over my 40+ year career in the trade, in retrospect, there are a handful of peeps' I wouldn't want to stand beside (or hire again) either!! (LOL)
     
  28. Wreck™Wreck

    Wreck™Wreck United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Always mind the hand wheels on machines that have a rapid traverse feature, I often use a 27" X 100"manual lathe which has an electric motor in the apron for this purpose, pushing the rapid button will spin the hand wheels rapidly, on this machine the Z axis wheel is at knee height and will rip your knee caps off.

    Rapid traverse is awesome, hand cranking a 600 Lb carriage up and down the bed all day quickly becomes a chore.
     
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  29. Christian Poulsen

    Christian Poulsen United States Active Member Active Member

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    ...all great posts all and I must say "Goofs and Blunders to Avoid" often (or at least sometmes) lead to safety issues

    Uh oh! (which brings to mind (Hey! I heard that!)...before I started the Machining trade...in the early 70's as an 18 yr old I was being trained on a biiiiigggg shear at Timpte Beall (aluminum and stainless tanker trucks)....we scribed the lines on the "sheets" (up 1/4" thick), 2 or 3 guys line up the lines (using overhead hoists etc.) and push the 2 big red buttons and the shear head comes down and cuts those big sheets before rolling them at the big rollers and welding the seams...anyway the guy that was assigned to train me on that shear came in drunk a lot (usually had a bottle of jack danials in his car for lunch break!!)..and he was missing about 2 or 3 fingers on each hand (various "stub" lengths)!!!!!
     
  30. kingmt01

    kingmt01 United States Active Member Active Member

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    Exactly
    That's why I said beside of you. It just sounds like I'd end up being the next story to tell. ;)
     

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