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Goofs & Blunders You Should Avoid.

Discussion in 'GOOFS & BLUNDERS YOU SHOULD AVOID!' started by David S, Jul 24, 2016.

  1. george wilson

    george wilson United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    XM: Tig weld!!!:)
     
  2. Wreck™Wreck

    Wreck™Wreck United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Straight flute drills, some call them die sinking drills.
    http://www.mscdirect.com/browse/tnp...544&004=20105638864&026=-99&002=2167139&025=c
     
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  3. MrFixIt

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  4. 4gsr

    4gsr Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    If my dad ever had a hunch us kids were going to pull a stunt as above, I would have been drug by the ear behind the tool shed and got the beating of my life time. Even though I already have had a couple beatings of the life time already!
     
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  5. MrFixIt

    MrFixIt H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Anyone doing something like that deserves a good trashing.
    And what's with his idiot friends giggling like school girls while he's being mangled?
     
  6. Martin W

    Martin W Canada H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I won't even watch that video:eek: You know what will happen. Dumb !ss.
     
  7. savarin

    savarin Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I just love watching Darwin in action:grin:
     
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  8. BGHansen

    BGHansen United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Too many for me to mention, but most boil down to the same root cause: impatience. I've broken dozens of taps and drill bits trying to hurry a project.

    I've had two close calls on a table saw. First one was a real "duh" moment. I was going to cut a rabbet on a piece of 3/4" wide x 1/4" thick plexiglass. I was using a wobble-wheel style dado blade. Squatted down to sight the blade height to half-way on the plexiglass. I turned the saw on while still squatted; wobble wheel was to the left and when it came back to the right caught the back edge of the plexiglass and whizzed it past my head. Other table saw close call was with a molding head and a blade set for cutting the cope on ends of the rails for cabinet doors. Rail was clamped to a universal jig with a sacrificial tear-out block hand screwed to the back side for tear out. Just as the cut was finished the hand screw vibrated loose and fell into the molding head. It splintered the 1 1/2" x 1 1/2" maple in a heartbeat and threw it back into the heal of my left hand. No puncture, but left a nice bruise.

    I also recall being in a hurry changing an 8" chuck on a lathe and instead of bending down to pick up a chuck block put my hand under the chuck to catch the weight. Guess I'm not as strong as I thought I was, dropped the chuck off the spindle and put my thumb between a rock and a hard place. Whole nail went black instantly. Needle over a match and a quick poke relieved the pressure.

    Worse one by far is why I'm sporting 4 1/2 fingers on my right hand. Like an idiot I was splitting wood on a hydraulic splitter. I was loading logs with someone else running the ram. Yes, you would never load sheet metal into a stamping press and let someone else hit the palm buttons. To make matters worse, I knew the person had been drinking all day . . . I was just setting a log in place when he cycled the ram. The middle joint of my right hand index finger was crushed on 11/24/1991, amputated on 11/27/1991. I wish I would have grown a pair and walked away before the accident. Miss picking my nose with that index finger . . .

    Bruce
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2016
  9. T Bredehoft

    T Bredehoft Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Back in the 'late '60s I was installing a multi blade (5" dia) dado head (above mention reminded me) on my table saw. The cut-out on the table was out, I had an open end wrench in my right hand, spanned the cutter with my left hand and attempted to tighten it. Before the wrench went on the nut, somehow my clothing moved the toggle start switch. Back of the blade put a lift on my second finger left hand, lifting my thumb off the blade. It left me with a bit of road rash on those two fingers, but no other harm. The next day there was a shield on the switch.

    After almost 50 years as a carpenter, ship's carpenter, then Tool & Die maker, I still have ten complete fingers. Three had minor damage, but nothing major. I am very grateful.
     
  10. george wilson

    george wilson United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I recall my earliest shop teacher demonstrating the table saw(Delta). He was cutting a bit off the side of plywood squares about 16" square. No blade guard was on the saw. Not the best thing to teach the students. The first one got caught by the blade and rapidly spun like a frisbee past him. So did the SECOND one!!

    The lesson must have really been: Don't cut SQUARES off on the table saw,using the FENCE. A strip of wood screwed onto the miter gauge to extend its width would have been appropriate.
     
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  11. RJSakowski

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    Ahh, table saws! Thanks to one and my own stupidity, I ended up with forty stitches and one thumb an 1/8" shorter than the other as a teenager. My Dad had an 8" MW table saw with the on/off switch on the base of the motor. I reached over the saw to shut it off and caught the blade. Fortunately there was only about 1/8" of exposed blade but my right hand looked a bit like hamburger. The only good thing was it got me out of writing a term paper for a few weeks, even though I'm left handed.

    Ever since then, whenever my hand is close to the blade, I make sure that at least three fingers are hooked over some sort of anchor.

    I work with chain saws, radial arm saws, jointers, and even a 30" 50 hp. buzz saw for fire wood but, to me, the most fearful is the table saw.
     
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  12. Charles Spencer

    Charles Spencer Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Of course nobody does it like the Army.

    I was at a demonstration on how to safely use pyrotechnics. The guy in charge picked one up, held it in front of his face, and said

    "You never want to pull the string like this..."

    BLAM!

    It was a very effective teaching method. Fortunately he only had flash burns.


    I agree. Things happen pretty fast at the speeds they run.
     
  13. Tony Wells

    Tony Wells United States Vice President Staff Member Administrator

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    Too many people underestimate woodworking machinery. That applies to veterans as well. The uncle I had that recently passed away had been a carpenter/cabinetmaker for 70 years or so, and had all his fingers, but about 5 years ago ran his palm across the jointer pushing a board through. I never saw him use a push stick, but apparently he was good....up until then. Maybe age caught up with his spacial sense and he thought he was clear. I wasn't there when it happened, but saw it later. It wasn't too bad, but there was no excuse.

    I think one of the main things different about woodworking machines is the speed they operate at. With metal equipment, by comparison, we may have time to pull our fingers back, or react to protect ourselves, but with ww equipment, it's all over by the time we realize there is a danger.
     
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  14. RJSakowski

    RJSakowski H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    The big difference between woodworking and metal working machines, as I see it, is that when working metal the work is securely fastened down and moved to the cutting tool or the cutting tool move to the work in a controlled manner. Additionally, the controls are typically removed from the cutting zone.
     
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  15. george wilson

    george wilson United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    What brand is a MW table saw?
     
  16. Tony Wells

    Tony Wells United States Vice President Staff Member Administrator

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    I'm guessing Monkey-Wards, George..............but I could be wrong.
     
  17. T Bredehoft

    T Bredehoft Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I said that to myself before I read your answer, Tony, Montgomery is just too long to even remember.
     
  18. george wilson

    george wilson United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I KNEW it would be clear once I heard the answer!!! Just couldn't extract MW from my head. I wish people would not abbreviate words so much.
     
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  19. jpfabricator

    jpfabricator United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    M2

    Sent from somwhere in east Texas by Jake!
     
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  20. brino

    brino Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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  21. mcostello

    mcostello Active User Active Member

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  22. Nick01

    Nick01 United States Iron Registered Member

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    Pay very close attention to the position of your cross slide while using the power feed.
    3 jaw chuck vs cross slide
    This was my introduction to what's called a learning curve in the field of machining and to make matters worse, happened before the lathe lost its "new car" smell (first week)
    image.jpeg
     
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  23. T Bredehoft

    T Bredehoft Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    M2
     
  24. mcostello

    mcostello Active User Active Member

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    Machinery is merciless!
     
  25. GA Gyro

    GA Gyro H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    IMO this also applies when it is pushing 100 outside, concerning ones work truck or van... :D
     
  26. Tony Wells

    Tony Wells United States Vice President Staff Member Administrator

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    I was on a job a couple of summers ago building a new hospital. Walked back out to the vehicle. Didn't need a key. Right rear passenger window was in tiny little pieces (safety glass). Never really figured it out. They were doing some mowing around the area, but it was record hot that day, and my vehicle is black. I looked inside thoroughly for a foreign object from the mowers.....kind of hoping it was them so I could make someone pay for the glass, but never found anything. Guess it could have bounced off. Watch where you park if there is a contract mowing crew around!

    Funny thing was, even the dealer was not able to get the correct tint. It has (now has one) really dark passenger glass. Factory says no, it doesn't. I had to put the wrong glass in. I started looking, and about 80% of the ones I see on the road HAVE the near black glass. Others have a sort of goldish tint. I went aftermarket and got as dark as I could.......still burns me. I drove around with a Plexiglass window for 2 months looking and trying to get the right one. Now I see them on ebay all the time. I just hate to buy one twice. If I do, I'll try to sell this wrong one to somebody.
     
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  27. jmhoying

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    Another tablesaw story. Back in 1987, I was ripping a 20" long board on the tablesaw and the board started to pinch the blade and was hopping a bit. I reached past the blade to hold the end down that had already been cut. At that moment, the wood caught the blade and shot out backwards, and pulled my hand with it. Completely split my thumb long ways and mangled my index finger. They ended up saving my thumb, but there isn't a joint in it, and I lost half of my index finder. It's been 29 years and I can still hear the sound of that board catching on the blade. I'm a cabinetmaker and still work with a tablesaw every day. I had respect for it before my accident, but I have a lot more now.
    Jack
    Fort Loramie, Ohio
     
  28. RJSakowski

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    I had the exact same experience. I never found any missile either. Fortunately, my comprehensive covered most of the bill.

    The guy that came out to replace the glass told me that the tempered glass windows were extremely susceptible to scratches, as he was gingerly scraping off the sticker on the new glass. A tiny scratch could make the the window spontaneously shatter. He told me that there were a lot of replacements in hot weather due to the glass heating and the stress building to the point of shattering. The glass is designed to break into tiny pieces with square edges to help prevent injuries.

    When I was in high school, I used to make an oddity called a Prince Rupert's Drop. It is made by heating glass to the melting point and allowing a drop to fall into into cold water, resulting in a teardrop shaped piece. Because the resultant stresses from the sudden cooling and shrinking were so well balanced, you could hit the drop with a hammer withou breaking it but if you snapped the thin tail of the drop off, it would shatter into dust.
     
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  29. Wreck™Wreck

    Wreck™Wreck United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Was turning a plug for holding the bearing bores in the end of tubular parts for OD turning yesterday, didn't tighten the chuck enough and pulled one out which rotated the tool post, this in itself is not a big problem. However it is an old CNC chucker lathe with a 24 tool library, when you realign the tool post you have to reset the work shift and reset all of the other 23 tool offsets, this is time consuming and tedious at best.
     
  30. RJSakowski

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    When I got my new G602 lathe, I hadn't built the stand for it yet. It was still strapped to the pallet on my shop floor. Being the curious person that I am, I started playing around with it. I pulled the three jaw chuck off the lathe to try the four jaw and faceplate and then reinstalled the three jaw. However, I didn't install the chuck retainers.

    I powered the lathe up an started it running forward. Then I started in reverse. The chuck spun off in an instant, falling on the ways and leaving an imprint of the chuck jaw on the rear Vee way. Fortunately, that surface is used by the tailstock which never reaches that position but it serves as a reminder every time I use the lathe to make sure the chuck retainers are installed.
     

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