1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. There are some site issues which I am working on. There may be reduced functionality in some modules while I do. Thank you for your patience.

    Dismiss Notice

Goofs & Blunders You Should Avoid.

Discussion in 'GOOFS & BLUNDERS YOU SHOULD AVOID!' started by David S, Jul 24, 2016.

  1. kwilliam

    kwilliam Australia Iron Registered Member

    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    3
    City:
    Adelaide
    State:
    Outside US / Canada

    -Return to Top-

    When things don't work - always calm down and think before you do something stupid.

    Like when I got my new mill. Nothing worked. Could not get it to fire up.
    Was all ready to jump on the phone and explode.
    Calmed down, thought about it.

    I knew it had a lot of lock-outs, but missed the one on the chip sheild *click* all works now!

    Saved myself some embarrassment.

    Oops - now everyone knows.

    Shame.
     
  2. Hawkeye

    Hawkeye Canada Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    352
    Trophy Points:
    83
    City:
    Kelowna
    State:
    British Columbia

    -Return to Top-

    Cut it out, guys. It hurts amost as much to laugh as it does to cough. :D:eek:
     
  3. markba633csi

    markba633csi United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    149
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Mountain View
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    Don't smoke a joint and run a big bandsaw. Just don't. Ouch. Band-aid.
    MS
     
  4. george wilson

    george wilson United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    648
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Williamsburg
    State:
    Virginia

    -Return to Top-

    Probably best to just not smoke a joint,period.
     
  5. markba633csi

    markba633csi United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    149
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Mountain View
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    Dumb kids in high school do dumb things. I'm a little wiser now, at 61.
    Mark S.
     
  6. TOOLMASTER

    TOOLMASTER you don't want to know Active Member

    Likes Received:
    1,039
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    SOMEWHERE
    State:
    Minnesota

    -Return to Top-



    put a balloon on the end
     
    Ulma Doctor likes this.
  7. savarin

    savarin Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    1,279
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Townsville

    -Return to Top-

    Now thats a good idea.
     
    R DALE and Ulma Doctor like this.
  8. Wreck™Wreck

    Wreck™Wreck United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    1,033
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Riverton
    State:
    New Jersey

    -Return to Top-

    Not me, but at the shop today a guy running 80" long 5" X 1/2" steel bars in a 4020 Fadal mill using 3 vices to hold them, these machines have removable panels on each end of the enclosure, he had them off.
    After one end is done it rapids towards the front to make it easier to move.

    The part sticking outside hit a steel roof coloumn and rotated the machine, it weighs 10,500 Lb's. Made quite the racket.

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct...YeTPARhJD4InSj0Tc7CdmQ0w&ust=1470173531584744
     
  9. samthedog

    samthedog Norway Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    134
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    Hvittingfoss
    State:
    Outside US / Canada

    -Return to Top-

    • When you adjust the tool post angle, ensure the post is tightened enough to avoid it turning on you while you machine. I have ruined a few parts having the post turn on me
    • Don't machine with long sleeves, even in cold weather. It's better to wear a vest than to get your arm ripped off
    • Place a piece of wood or a nylon cutting board on the drill press table then your job on top. When you see different colored swarf it's time to stop. I have seen some unsightly holes drilled into the table that could have been avoided
    • Never forgo safety for convenience. I caught some fiberglass in the eye from an angle grinder disk that nearly drove me crazy before it could be surgically removed
    • Never assume a capacitor is discharged. I nearly rode the lightning into the next life with this one
    • Don't walk away from a machine in operation. Strange things happen the moment you take your eyes off the machine
    • When you see a good deal on a machine, assume EVERYONE has also seen said deal and is frantically trying to organize funds and transport. Buy first, work out logistics later
    All goofs above were learned by yours truly either directly or indirectly.
     
    Alec, vtcnc, bjornsh67 and 3 others like this.
  10. george wilson

    george wilson United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    648
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Williamsburg
    State:
    Virginia

    -Return to Top-

    In reference to the above post,if you are using an old fashioned lantern tool post,clamp the tool holder in such a way that the cutting tool swings AWAY from the metal being turned,rather than INTO it if it comes loose under the pressure of cutting.

    For Aloris type tool posts: If you can't seem to get the tool post tight enough,place a couple of pieces of BROWN PAPER BAG paper under each side of the block that holds the tool. I say brown paper because it has no CLAY in it. Shiny magazine papers have clay in them,and are slippery. If in doubt,just use plain old,dull finished brown bag paper. DO NOT USE brown paper that has had a shiny coat applied to it,as some butcher's papers have(to make them not leak blood). Those papers will slip,too.

    I also use slips of clay free paper in my Kurt vise. Slippery metals like brass and aluminum will be held in a death grip by the paper! Really!!!!

    I wish I'd done that years ago,(and I KNEW better,too,but was in a hurry,as so many accidents are caused!). I was drilling a hole in a sharp cornered block of brass in the drill press. The block was held in a smooth jawed toolmaker's vise. Clamped TIGHT,too! That brass sucked up out of the vise,spun and cut my finger about 1" from the end quite DEEP. It was at least 10 years before feeling got back into that part of my finger.

    I was in a hurry,and did 2 things wrong: 1; use paper in the SMOOTH jaws. 2; grind a vertical flat on the cutting edges of the 1/2" drill so it wouldn't suck up the brass when it broke through. This is GOOD,GOLDEN advice when you are drilling Plexiglass,too. It will shatter when the drill breaks through. Take this advice and save yourself lots of money when drilling a sheet of plexiglass!! Grinding a vertical edge on the drill causes it to scrape rather than cut. It doesn't seem to make the drill less effective when using a drill press. Might hurt when pushing an electric drill by hand. Keep the edges sharp.

    I was in a Hi Fi shop where the owners had made a clear Plexiglass speaker cabinet(why see all those wires? I guess to gloat over the expensive speaker!). They remarked that they wouldn't be asking so much for it if they hadn't broken so much plastic when drilling it. I showed them how to grind their drill for the next time. You used to could buy drills for brass. I have some. They are just like twist drills,but their flutes are straight,not twisted. Since brass still has to be drilled,I wonder if some specialist still sells them?
     
  11. Reeltor

    Reeltor United States Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    206
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Lawrenceville
    State:
    Georgia

    -Return to Top-

    I once knew a guy who thought it was great fun to toss a fully charged capacitor to "the new guy" to catch.
    I never saw the retribution but I always assumed that at least one person had a meeting with this yahoo after work and off company property.

    Looking back as some of the practical jokes that we played; none seem funny.
     
    Stirmind likes this.
  12. Reeltor

    Reeltor United States Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    206
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Lawrenceville
    State:
    Georgia

    -Return to Top-

    George,

    I'm having a mind freeze on this vertical flat idea. Can you post a sketch or photo?
     
  13. george wilson

    george wilson United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    648
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Williamsburg
    State:
    Virginia

    -Return to Top-

    A charged capacitor can stop your heart. Horsing around like that by ignorant clowns can have tragic results. Air hoses can blow up your intestines and kill you,too. That's why the safety models with the holes drilled through their sides are made. You know exactly where some idiot is going to jam an air hose.

    I don't have a picture of the drill. The cutting edge of drills is a wedge shape made by the angle of the bottom edges of the drill,and the angle where the spiral flute meets the cutting edge. Just grind the spiral flute into a vertical angle where the spiral flute meets the cutting edge. That way the drill scrapes instead of cutting as it drills. It's not complicated. You only need to grind a 1/32" tall vertical spot on the drill for this to work.

    Google "How to grind a drill bit for drilling in brass". There are several sites to go to for pictures and demos.
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2016
    4gsr likes this.
  14. chips&more

    chips&more United States Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    886
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Danville
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    Don’t go looking for a Pokemon and leave the lathe/mill running with the power feed on!
     
    Nick01, 4gsr and BGHansen like this.
  15. RJSakowski

    RJSakowski H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    1,955
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Barneveld
    State:
    Wisconsin

    -Return to Top-

    Speaking of capacitors, I remember an incident in HS Physics class where a Wimhurst generator was being used to demonstrate static electricity principles. A Leyden jar (an early form of capacitor) was sitting on the counter and I absentmindedly picked it up and brought the ball terminal up in the vicinity of my lip. It was charged to something more than 50KV and the lesson was learned. To add insult to injury, I touched the ball with a finger and again learned a lesson that even though you discharge a capacitor, there is usually a residual charge left.

    Ever since then, I discharge capacitors not once but twice before handling.
     
    4gsr, Martin W and JimDawson like this.
  16. T Bredehoft

    T Bredehoft Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    1,059
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Central Ohio
    City:
    St. Louisville
    State:
    Ohio

    -Return to Top-

    When I was growing up, we called that a "titanium rake". Its a flat ground on the twisted face of the drill, parallel the axis. No. I dont' have a picture, either. As George said, it makes the drill scrape instead of cut, like drawing a knife sideways across a piece of wood.
     
  17. Whyemier

    Whyemier United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    347
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    Spring Hill
    State:
    Florida

    -Return to Top-

    A note about 'chip breakers' and long chips.

    When I had my first 'real' job as a machinist, well machinist's helper was the title. We made punches and dies for mass production in a small shop. So tool steel was the norm for turning and milling. I don't know what I was turning in the machine, I didn't know one metal from the other at that time...come to think of it if I ever did I've forgotten most of it...the cut produced a long continuous chip. Very ductile material. I wasn't thinking about breaking the chip and let it go where it wanted. It wanted to wrap around the levers and knobs on the apron of the carriage.

    When my cut was nearing the end, very close to the chuck I might add, I reached down to disengage the feed. Well as things go the chuck chose that moment to grab the chip, catching my finger in a 'loop' of the chip and snatching my hand up from the lever. It caught my finger and sliced it to the bone, had it been an eighth of an inch lower it would have taken part of the finger at the joint. That was forty two years ago and my right hand index finger is still numb and it aches like the dickens on cold days. Could put it all down to ignorance on my part or blame the machinist for not keeping an eye on the helper but I know I have no one to blame but me. When working with machine tools we all need to be aware of what is going on at all times.

    Point is, break the chip if it doesn't break on its own.
     
    brino likes this.
  18. T Bredehoft

    T Bredehoft Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    1,059
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Central Ohio
    City:
    St. Louisville
    State:
    Ohio

    -Return to Top-

    When using a vertical band saw to cut aluminum, don't push where the blade will come through. I put a screw driver slot in my left thumb many years ago. The scar's still there, a line connecting the two corners of my thumb nail. The skin inside it is ultra sensitive, like the nerves grew back with a vengeance.

    I was cutting up some scraps to make pads for the jaws of a vise.
     
  19. ChipsAlloy!

    ChipsAlloy! Canada Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    17
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    Les Cèdres
    State:
    Province du Quebec

    -Return to Top-

    Happened to me a couple times, not in the ears but on fingers.

    Pressed the pedal to feel the gas flow..
    We have different tig welders at work, plus my own at home wich is ''lift arc''. Only one of these machines is high frequency so having done lots of welding with the other machines I kinda forgot this particular one was HF.

    For those not familiar with the high frequency thing here's a short definition from the millerweld website:

    the current must heat the tungsten so it becomes a better emitter of electrons; at that point, the arc can jump from the tungsten to the work piece. One traditional option for solving DC arc starting problems, and the standard method for improving AC arc starts, involves superimposing a high frequency (HF) current over the welding current. Basically, the HF current forms a path for the welding current to follow and so the arc can be established.

    - See more at: https://www.millerwelds.com/resourc...a-tig-welding-machine-qa#sthash.WO8QKFyp.dpuf
     
  20. TOOLMASTER

    TOOLMASTER you don't want to know Active Member

    Likes Received:
    1,039
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    SOMEWHERE
    State:
    Minnesota

    -Return to Top-

    make real sure transformer is unplugged before adjusting contacts on a jacobs ladder..

    never set your coffee next to other chemicals..they never taste the same.
     
    4gsr, rhynardt, Reeltor and 1 other person like this.
  21. xman_charl

    xman_charl Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    vallejo
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    Many years ago, while working at this factory. Making parts for military.

    Work area I was assigned, assembly machines, very little machining to keep them running.
    Just remove, replace part.

    Know a little how to run a lathe, mill, surface grinder.

    Supervisor put me in grinding room.

    Showed me how to use a 2 wheel grinder, used for sharpening end mills.

    Forgot to turn 1 wheel off, reached in for the part, bam, cut finger below the skin.

    Have a 1/2 scar on my middle finger from that. Supervisor got reprimanded, told
    shop foreman, he really need those parts.

    Worked there about 6 years, 3 or 4 machinists, got their fingers chopped off
    in that grinding room.

    I was lucky.

    Be careful !!

    Charl
     
  22. george wilson

    george wilson United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    648
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Williamsburg
    State:
    Virginia

    -Return to Top-

    Did you all see the video when a high school muscle man lost a contrest between himself and hanging on to the chuck key of a largish lathe? He started on the back side of the lathe,and got flipped over to the front side. I can't recall the injuries he got before another student hit the off button!! Fortunately,I don't think he was seriously hurt. Another incident done when the teacher wasn't looking.

    In the high school where I went my last 2 years(I wasn't taking metal working. I was interested in making guitars in woodshop). The metal working teacher was always gone from class. Where,I have no idea. The students would throw files at each other,make the torch sound like a machine gun,and do other assorted dangerous things. Old teach finally got fired when he was gone so much that his students actually managed to build a STILL,and were actually getting alcohol to drink from it!

    We had a very advanced printing shop because they printed the school yearbooks there,pictures,binding and all. The teacher nearly got fired when the FBI showed up to search the shop!! The teacher was showing the students how accurately the equipment could reproduce material,and he printed one side of a $5.00 bill!! I remember that guy. He was a kind of goof off.

    I also heard about the time the FBI showed up in force and searched every building and basement in the whole mile long museum in Williamsburg where I later worked for 40 years. They were determined to find the GAMING TABLES!!!!:)The director was unintentionally buying dice for a board game they sold from a member of the mafia in Florida!! The company lawyers threw their hands up at that one and refused to help. The director managed to keep his job. How was he to know,really?
     
    4gsr likes this.
  23. silence dogood

    silence dogood United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    134
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    pendleton
    State:
    Oregon

    -Return to Top-

    I made a living as an electronic organ technician. A number of years ago, I had to work on a Hammond organ. It was one of these situations that I had to turn the instrument on and off in order to find the problem. Unbeknownst to me, the lady of the house(I have no idea why) turned it on when it was off and then she walked away. Fortunately, for me, nothing happened. However, after I got back to the shop, I made a box that consisted a fuse and a lighted switch which I could plug any organ into. This little device gave me complete control.
     
  24. george wilson

    george wilson United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    648
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Williamsburg
    State:
    Virginia

    -Return to Top-

    I loaned a friend a 12" thickness planer years ago,similar to a Belsaw. not a lunchbox type. He was changing the knives,WITHOUT HAVING UNPLUGGED IT,when another guy came in and idly flipped it on. Totally ruined the loose knives and the gibs which flew out and got all bent. That cost them $130.00 for new parts! NEVER,EVER work on a plugged in machine. Many years ago,I had an old 6" jointer that would turn itself on!! Needed a new switch.

    I heard about another guy who ruined the infeed table on his Makita 6" jointer/planer combo. He was changing knives,answered the phone,came back,and idly turned the machine on! It took a hunk out of the infeed table. He was lucky to not get hit by blades or gibs. Then,he was complaining about the lack of response from Makita!!
     
  25. silence dogood

    silence dogood United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    134
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    pendleton
    State:
    Oregon

    -Return to Top-

    George, I never have been able to figure why someone would flip a switch even when there is a tag on it. Thinking back on working on that organ, I think that I left the plug in was because I would have to crawl under a piece of furniture to get to the plug-in. But I learned my lesson and that was why I built that control box.
    A friend of mine told me a story about his father-in-law. He was a pilot for what I believe a B26 and he was selected to take some officers to some meeting in Europe. Behind the pilot was a jumpseat and a second luey was in it. He saw and reached up and pulled this switch. Suddenly everything including the engines shut off. The pilot calmly reached back turn it back on and had his copilot help him restart the engines. Just before takeoff on the return trip, The general handed him his 45 and told him he had his permission to shot anyone who tried that again. The flight back was uneventful.
     
    toolman, Alec, Reeltor and 2 others like this.
  26. benmychree

    benmychree United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    62
    Trophy Points:
    28
    City:
    Saint Helena
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    Bottom line, do not do the same thing twice, expecting different results.
     
  27. george wilson

    george wilson United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    648
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Williamsburg
    State:
    Virginia

    -Return to Top-

    Does that include getting remarried?:)
     
  28. Reeltor

    Reeltor United States Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    206
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Lawrenceville
    State:
    Georgia

    -Return to Top-

    Only if it's to the same woman :)
     
  29. xman_charl

    xman_charl Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    vallejo
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    How do you shut their mouths?
     
    British Steel likes this.
  30. tq60

    tq60 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    120
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    madera
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    In a past life working on motrac mobile radios all day (these were mobile 2 way units that were almost all solid state but had a tube final amp with inverter that only ran when mic ptt acticated) you simply pull the cover to reset the tube then attach and then tune.

    After about 6 to 9 of them yiu work on the base radio under the desk and out of habit pull the cover...but being line powered the high voltage of about 500 or so volts is always there and with this unit on the floor under a desk the desk somehow lifted about a foot...

    Person in office came running to ask if I was okay...responded with something like leg wss cramped up and needed to stretch...

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk
     

Share This Page