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Goofs & Blunders You Should Avoid.

bobl

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Jan 9, 2015
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First time ever for this hobbyist. I was side milling a fairly small part held in the vice on two parallels. I taped the part down onto the parallels while tightening the vise. The part being milled was outside the vise jaws. Long story short one parallel managed to slip forward and crash the end mill. Parallel survived, milling cutter not so much.

I took a piece of shipping steel banding and bent it into a U to hold the parallels tight against the jaws and also made sure the part was seated firmly on both parallels.

David
Springs are also good


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Wreck™Wreck

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Always ensure the chuck jaws are engaged in the spiral.
Very quickly I set up a half inch wide cut off of a large plastic pipe and used the three jaw to expand outwards on the inside of the pipe so I could true the face.
OK, nice and tight, start to cut and zoom, bang!
two of the jaws flew across the room, they had expanded enough to pop out the spiral but the plastic ring kept them in place so I hadnt noticed.
Luckily I was not in the line of flight.
I always spin the chuck by hand in a small lathe before running the spindle. unusual run out will tell you immediatley that something is wrong, keep this in mind.
 

bobshobby

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I always spin the chuck by hand in a small lathe before running the spindle. unusual run out will tell you immediatley that something is wrong, keep this in mind.
Iguess that's one advantage of having done an apprenticeship. I was taught to always check that thejaws are well engaged. If my set up looks like being anywhere neer the limit of engagement I check where that limit is and see how much margin I have. If it looks a bit risky then I can reset the jaws on the next step, or use another set up plan.
 

mcostello

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Dec 29, 2013
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Another tip is, If using a magnetic chuck, turn it on, then try to move the piece, a quick shake can save the day. The first grind job when I got My surface grinder was to sharpen a lathe groove tool. It was Stellite and found out it was non-magnetic. Glad I checked. Saved a pair of undies that day. :)
 

richl

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Mar 2, 2013
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How about this one....
I really enjoy welding, I don't get to do it too much. Mig And stick machines in the shop, so there really is no reason not to. Getting up in age almost 60, eyes aren't so good anymore. The last year I've really had trouble welding, I could not see the puddle, and my welds were wandering anywhere but where I wanted them.

Well jump forward to monday, eclipse, welding helmets make decent glasses for them. I broke out a couple helmets... I noticed that there was protective film paper on the glass of one of the helmets... crap!!! Peaked off all film from all lens I replaced over a year ago!!! My welds just have substantially improved lol

Won't forget that one anytime soon

Rich
 

4gsr

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If only they had a third, bigger fork-lift to lift the one on the ground........;)
-brino
Brino,

Somewhere on the internet is a picture of three fork lifts, one on top of each other, reaching about 30 feet in the air. With a man cage on the upper forklift extended up. The guy is in the cage using a cutting torch to cut a beam or angle, not really specific.
 
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