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Gloves in the shop

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dulltool17

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#61
The only gloves I EVER wear when using my machines are nitrile rubber, and even then only for truly rough work, when my hands will only be on controls. If doing any close work, like polishing a barrel, I have one hand on the EMO button, and the other is bare.
 

Ebel440

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#62
I wear nitrile gloves everyday working with mills etc. I started wearing them because the coolant caused contact dermatitis. And my hands were a mess with open sores until I stopped getting coolant on them. I try to use thinner gloves that will hopefully tear away before pulling me in. The best idea is to never get where your hand could be pulled in anyway.
 

dulltool17

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#63
I wear nitrile gloves everyday working with mills etc. I started wearing them because the coolant caused contact dermatitis. And my hands were a mess with open sores until I stopped getting coolant on them. I try to use thinner gloves that will hopefully tear away before pulling me in. The best idea is to never get where your hand could be pulled in anyway.

Agreed. Probably the best reason yet. There are such things as "barrier creams" available that coat your skin to act as a "glove"
I used them at one point, with some success.
 

kvt

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#64
I to have dermatitis and use the nitrile gloves all the time, I had thought of the barrier creams but they rub off on stuff, and also do not work to good on open spots which I often get. Unless you have a type that will work better. The other thing that the nitrile does is helps keep any solvents away from the skin.
 

tq60

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#65
There is a 200 count box of extra large nitrile gloves currently on amazon for maybe 9 bucks or so.

Easy to get on sue to size and they are a bit thinner than some others so they are less likely to pull you in.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk
 

bfd

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#66
where Iworked gloves were required anytime you were performing any work. even rotating equipment work I tried to argue with the bosses but no help. finally I just told them write me up my fingers are more important than your rules. bill
 

Hukshawn

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#69
The barrier creams were mainly designed for the food industries for direct contact with food. A barrier for germs and bacteria. Not so much for industrial use as a cream has limited protection for solvents, oils, abrasives, or just handling hard/sharp objects.
 

Mach89

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#70
At a plant I worked at 16 years ago, there was a woman running a lathe making small motor shalves. The lathe had a spring loaded tailstock so her and the rest of those doing that job would finish a part, and just release the tailstock and drop the part in hand, then set the next one in and let the tailstock spring back in place. All this while the spindle was running. She was wearing white cotton gloves I believe. Anyway, the glove got caught and she ended up 3 fingers shy of ten. I'm pretty sure they were able to sew them back on. This story is what always runs through my head any time I see or hear of someone wearing gloves running machines. Gloves while handling material or loading a machine is fine while all moving parts (spindle especially) are at rest. But the gloves need to come off before starting motion.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
 

Highsider

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#71
It's not just the metal work shop... We had a lawyer who got his tie caught in the office paper shredder. It pulled his head almost to the machine before someone managed to help him.

I guess some people are just accident prone.

Sent from my SM-N920C using Tapatalk
There should be a lawyer joke in there somewhere.
 
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