1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. PLEASE: Read the FORUM RULES BEFORE registering!

    Dismiss Notice

Gloves in the shop

Discussion in 'SAFETY ISSUES & EQUIPMENT' started by Roger Taylor, Feb 17, 2015.

  1. mattthemuppet

    mattthemuppet Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    685
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Walla Walla
    State:
    Washington

    -Return to Top-

    I'd love it to be 45 in the shop, I'd be out there in shorts and T-shirt, basking in the warmth :) I've been down to 10F in the garage before, but then it starts to get painful as anything metal you pick up hurts. There's no point heating it either - big open space with no insulation. On the flipside, in summer it gets up to 110F in there, so I end up getting hot chips hitting my chest and stuck between my toes. When I get my own place, an insulated and heated workshop/ garage will be near the top of the list!
     
  2. Jmkimsey88

    Jmkimsey88 United States Swarf Registered Member

    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    City:
    Half Moon Bay
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    Gloves are not the problem, it's whomever is using them incorrectly that creates any physical dilemma. If a machine is cutting or turning, your hands
    shouldn't be directly in the tool cutting path to begin with.
     
  3. Keith Foor

    Keith Foor Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    198
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Johnstown
    State:
    Ohio

    -Return to Top-

    I am sorry but the idea of not wearing gloves that will protect your hands so that you can do stupid things like put your hands near moving or rotating tooling is sort of counter productive. It's akin to the argument I have heard where someone refuses to wear a seat belt because someone that slammed into a wall at 70 MPH had a seat belt cut into them and kill them. Never mind hitting the windshield or steering column would have made them just as dead. I have worked wood, metal, plastics, wrenched on cars and many other hands on things. I wear gloves. I also don't put my hands in places that they can get caught. If it's moving, it gets a wide berth of at least 6 inches. No matter if it's a piece of work in a lathe, a cutter in a mill or a saw blade on a table saw. I even go as far as setting circular and table saw blades to only cut 1/8 inch over the thickness of the material being cut. It is too easy to take the time to work safely and not expose myself to dangerous situations that can be avoided by taking a minute or two of additional time to setup a saw or clamp something or shut off a piece of equipment to clean swarf or sawdust or whatever.
     
  4. core-oil

    core-oil United Kingdom Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    83
    Trophy Points:
    28
    City:
    Motherwell

    -Return to Top-

    Some months back I attended a lecture in which the speaker stated that "In the Glasgow area all the turners on big machines wore ties"-- Really? I have been around that area for most of my past working life, (Before the present crazy economics shut 90% of them down, from the 1980/s on wards) And cannot remember these guys having ties on when operating machine tools, The only exceptions I do recall were some of the old toolmakers who looked a million dollars , wore a nice blue shirt , white collar & tie and frequently a smart grey warehouse coat which kept them safe by keeping their tie prisoner.
    Some years back (about 20 years ago) an unfortunate turner was killed in Scotland by a rag on his overall sleeve which became entangled with a large steel cutting dragging him into the machine.

    Guys have fun, enjoy your machine tools, Without mine, I would be lost, But keep alert to the split second accident which can occur, "Care and Caution + Common Sense",
    and life should be a beach.
     
    Black13 likes this.
  5. BludNSweat

    BludNSweat United States Swarf Registered Member

    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    City:
    Greeley
    State:
    Colorado

    -Return to Top-

    One of the first things I was taught was no gloves, no jewelry or watches, keep your shirt tucked in and roll up your sleeves and check yourself to make sure there is nothing on your body that could get pulled into a machine including hair.
     
  6. T Bredehoft

    T Bredehoft Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    1,250
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Central Ohio
    City:
    St. Louisville
    State:
    Ohio

    -Return to Top-

    I'm glad to hear that, our old friend Arthritis has made it so I can no longer easily button cuff buttons. I roll my sleeves up when I put on a shirt and live that way. I do, occasionally, realize they need re-rolling and do so, but still am a bit concerned. I am aware when working on the lathe that I need to have care, so I guess I do.
     
  7. TommyD

    TommyD Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    156
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Salem
    State:
    Connecticut

    -Return to Top-

    The ONLY time I wear gloves is using air tools, grinders, cut off and the like, I like the plain white leather ones best. Those air tools get AWFULLY cold fast in the winter.
     
  8. TommyD

    TommyD Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    156
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Salem
    State:
    Connecticut

    -Return to Top-

    I was a Manufacturing Engineer in a few places and NEVER wore a tie and no boss ever said anything about it. I was out in all sorts of machinery, up close and personal like, and I wasn't gonna let a rag around my neck get me hurt. I used to shake my heads at those that wore ties.....then again, they didn't spend much time on the floor.
     
    4gsr likes this.
  9. TOOLMASTER

    TOOLMASTER you don't want to know Active Member

    Likes Received:
    1,046
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    SOMEWHERE
    State:
    Minnesota

    -Return to Top-

    skin will grow back. your gloves won't. be kind to gloves.
     
    FOMOGO, planeflyer21 and rwm like this.
  10. rwm

    rwm Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    1,054
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Charlotte
    State:
    North Carolina

    -Return to Top-

    I get what you are saying, but the concept of no gloves is pretty well established. No matter how careful you are there will come an opportunity for your gloved hand to get caught by a machine tool an pull you in. That is different that a seat belt which is shown to statistically reduce injury. Earlier in the thread I commented on a guy who got cut by an industrial bandsaw. He was wearing gloves. He got pulled into the blade and cut his hand off. I have been cut by my bandsaw (just two fingers.) Thank God I was not wearing gloves.
    Having said that, I think gloves are essential for some tools. Angle grinders and torches come to mind. The bottom line is I think you need to be aware of the risks and evaluate each unique situation rather than always wear gloves.
    I hope I am not being too argumentative.
    R
     
    TommyD likes this.
  11. savarin

    savarin Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    1,772
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Townsville

    -Return to Top-

    I would like to be able to wear nitrile gloves just to keep my hands clean but after approx 10 seconds they start filling up with sweat so I dont.
    The slippery feel of sweaty fingers in a glove feels appalling.
     
  12. Keith Foor

    Keith Foor Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    198
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Johnstown
    State:
    Ohio

    -Return to Top-

    Don't see it as argumentative at all. I wear Mechanix Wear gloves when working with most things. When the screws get below number 10 size its a bit difficult and they come off.
     
  13. intjonmiller

    intjonmiller United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    678
    Trophy Points:
    93
    City:
    Layton
    State:
    Utah

    -Return to Top-

    I did sheet metal work for a while, as well as other construction. It is hard to break that habit of wearing gloves. I learned from a minor woodworking accident, where my fingers were no closer than 3-4" from the table saw blade, but got pulled in when the long piece I was retrieving suddenly shifted (and Archimedes won that round), that you don't put anything anywhere near the tool that you don't want to lose. Sacrificial tools only. Fortunately I escaped with just a couple stitches as I only caught the side of the teeth with the tip of one finger. I've always been "Mr Safety", but that one took me by surprise. And I was working later than I should have. I now have a 9 PM power tool curfew for that reason. I can only operate the broom after that.

    Quite recently a woman was killed at a local grocery store when she got pulled into the commercial mixer in the bakery. I never heard exactly how it happened, but I'm confident that at some point someone made some poor safety choices, either in policies or in whether or not to follow policies.
     
    Ulma Doctor likes this.
  14. Ulma Doctor

    Ulma Doctor Infinitely Curious Active Member

    Likes Received:
    2,839
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Ethereal Plane
    City:
    Tracy
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    i know of a more than a few instances that had sadly similar results in the processing houses as well as grocery stores.
    i seen some stuff over the years- i wish i didn't.
    here's a sanitized version of one incident.
    i was called off hours by a fire department asking me how to reverse the motor's direction for a small meat grinder.
    a young worker's hand was stuck in it.
    i was the closest guy...
    fortunately the doctors saved the hand, but not all the digits made it.
     
    chips&more and intjonmiller like this.
  15. intjonmiller

    intjonmiller United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    678
    Trophy Points:
    93
    City:
    Layton
    State:
    Utah

    -Return to Top-

    Reading the story just broke my heart. Just imagining her surprise and painful death, the shock her coworkers and employers and especially family must have felt learning that she died working at the grocery store. The torque on those machines is nothing to mess around with, but most people have no idea how scary it can be.

    Here's one report about it: https://www.ksl.com/?sid=38382910&nid=148
     
  16. chips&more

    chips&more United States Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    1,220
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Danville
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    We have a love for our toys in the shop. BUT, there must be an understanding, that this love can hurt you! Please please be careful.
     
  17. ericc

    ericc United States Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    38
    Trophy Points:
    28
    City:
    Sunnyvale
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    I think it all depends on the situation. Our safety guy said although gloves were customary on the oil rigs, never wear gloves when logging on a rig in Siberia. The cables are always frayed, and they are unguarded, and a gloved hand will be caught and end up dragging the wearer into the wheel. I look around rigs in the US, and everybody is wearing gloves. The safety guy said you will get your hands cut up real bad in Siberia, but don't wear the gloves.
     
  18. Fabrickator

    Fabrickator United States Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    340
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    Lakewood
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    No gloves are ever used in my shop, except for occasionally hauling wood to or from the truck. If you don't want to get dirty, find another creative, satisfying hobby like quilting...
     
    bfd, savarin and Bill Gruby like this.
  19. rwm

    rwm Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    1,054
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Charlotte
    State:
    North Carolina

    -Return to Top-

    I have used gloves for quilting. Then one day I found myself sewed to a quilt. It's all dangerous.
    R
     
    4gsr and MrFixIt like this.
  20. intjonmiller

    intjonmiller United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    678
    Trophy Points:
    93
    City:
    Layton
    State:
    Utah

    -Return to Top-

    I find it remarkable how many people make the assumption that gloves are only for keeping your hands clean. First of all, that's only true if you are very careful to actually keep your hands clean, and never put the gloves on when your hands are dirty or you will get dirty every time you put them on. But more importantly they are usually for safety, not cleanliness. (Even in medical use they are for health and safety, keeping everything else clean more than about keeping hands clean, though obviously that is also a benefit.) Just because they are not advisable around machinery with exposed moving parts doesn't mean they don't have substantial use as PPE.

    I just don't understand mocking someone for wearing gloves.
     
    Bill Gruby and kd4gij like this.
  21. JimDawson

    JimDawson Global Moderator Staff Member Director

    Likes Received:
    3,807
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Sandy
    State:
    Oregon

    -Return to Top-

    The only time I wear gloves in my shop is handling large or hot chunks of iron, or welding. Absolutely no gloves around machine tools.
     
    4gsr and Ulma Doctor like this.
  22. rwm

    rwm Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    1,054
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Charlotte
    State:
    North Carolina

    -Return to Top-

    Interestingly, I was at a holiday party last night and ran into a hand surgeon. Since he was drinking, I took the opportunity to ask him about hand injuries, specifically what do I do if I lose a finger in the shop. Now don't get me wrong, I'm not planning on that but I think we all realize it is a distinct possibility. He told me that if it was just one finger it was probably not worth reattaching because it was unlikely that it would ever function well and I would ask for it to be removed later. NOT what I wanted to hear. If it was multiple fingers that would result in significant disability anyway so they might reattach one or more. He said to put them in a clean bag and put that on ice. Get to a University Hospital or Level One trauma center. They are good for about 24 hours so traveling is not out of the question. Sorry if this sounds too morbid but it is not the kind of advice you have access to everyday.
    He was also very interested in the metal work and what kind of things we make! Be safe.
    Robert
     
  23. 4gsr

    4gsr Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    2,215
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Victoria, Texas
    City:
    Victoria
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    Yeah, in my neck of the woods, a level one trauma center is 2 hours away! The local hospital would probably sew up the open hole and call it good and send me home. :eek:

    Be safe out there in your shop! I try to. It's hard to sometimes. Try to think a step ahead of yourself when making moves. That last step could cost you a limb or two! Or death!
     
  24. intjonmiller

    intjonmiller United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    678
    Trophy Points:
    93
    City:
    Layton
    State:
    Utah

    -Return to Top-

    Don't overlook that important detail! Directly on the ice is bad. A severed body part needs to be kept cool, but should not be frozen, even just in points of contact with the ice. The insulation of a bag, or better double-bagged, protects it from cellular damage.

    My brother had his hand pulled into a snowblower about a decade ago. The theory is that there must have been loose threads or something on his gloves and those got caught and pulled him in. When I got the call to go clean up the mess he left in front of his neighbor's house while my mom went to pick him up and take him to the ER, I couldn't believe it had happened, because he has always been Mr. Safety. He grew up helping our great-grandfather with his snowblower, and had adopted the same practice of hanging a stick, like a short length of an old broomstick, from a strap on the handle of the snowblower so you won't ever be tempted to try to clear a mess manually. He says he was sure he was far enough away that he was in no danger, and then suddenly his hand was in there. Accidents like that can happen to anyone, and knowing how to handle it is important.

    Also the surgeon wasn't kidding. My brother needed half a day of surgery with a couple of surgeons (they described the x-ray of his hand as "cornflakes" rather than bones), and he had to re-learn how to type (was a developer, now an IT director), and he can now predict the weather through the pain he experiences as the barometric pressure changes. They can sew it all up again, but you'll never be the same.
     
  25. FOMOGO

    FOMOGO United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    1,134
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Colorado
    City:
    Steamboat Springs
    State:
    Colorado

    -Return to Top-

    Recall hearing from a relative once about her brother losing a digit while woodworking. His mother stuck the finger in half a watermelon that was on the kitchen table before taking him to the hospital. They said that was a good move. Pretty sure that was prior to the plastic bag era. Remember when your lunch was always wrapped in wax-paper, and you had to use a church key to open your beverage of choice? You tell kids that today and they look at you like your from another planet. That may be true, I keep waiting for the mother ship to come and take me home.:) Mike
     
    core-oil, 4gsr, ddickey and 2 others like this.
  26. Silverbullet

    Silverbullet Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    789
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Marlton
    State:
    New Jersey

    -Return to Top-

    Every time I see a YouTube video with un safe practice I leave them a nice please don't wear loose long sleeves or no eye protection. Just a week ago I saw a man on video get sucked into a running lathe. He didn't look to hurt but he died later that night. It's always better to be dirty or have splinters then to be dead. That machine don't care if you live or die . It's a hard video to watch he leans into the machine his shirt gets caught and he's twisted up n the lathe. Should never had happened. SAFTEY is everyone's responsibility. If you see it tell them if they don't listen tell someone higher up. Un called for in our osha safe times. I'm not sure if the accident was in the USA but still it shouldn't have happened.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2016
    intjonmiller likes this.
  27. intjonmiller

    intjonmiller United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    678
    Trophy Points:
    93
    City:
    Layton
    State:
    Utah

    -Return to Top-

    What's amazing is how people can react so negatively when you try to share safety concerns like that.
     
    Fitter Bill and 4gsr like this.
  28. GLCarlson

    GLCarlson United States Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    61
    Trophy Points:
    28
    City:
    Knoxville
    State:
    Tennessee

    -Return to Top-

    And then you ban them from the shop. Instantly. Forever. Because they have just announced that the rules don't apply to them. Machines are like laws of nature: the penalty for ignoring the rules is death or worse, there's no appeal, you don't get a do-over, and the penalty is imposed instantly without pity.

    I admit I'll usually try, once, to make the rules clear; especially today, few have real experience with hard lessons. But- one try only. Argue, ignore, disregard...gone.
     
    intjonmiller and kvt like this.
  29. Steven Storey

    Steven Storey United Kingdom Iron Registered Member

    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    3
    City:
    Newcastle Upon Tyne
    State:
    Outside US / Canada

    -Return to Top-

    I'm the same, wouldn't dream of wearing any gloves, one or both hands on the machine at any time.
     
  30. SapperDave

    SapperDave United Kingdom Iron Registered Member

    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    St Andrews
    City:
    St Andrews
    State:
    Outside US / Canada

    -Return to Top-

    Completely agree, only gloves I wear are anti vibration ones when using construction tools, everything comes off my hands and arms in the workshop. I get a bit irritated when other people refuse.
     
    hermetic likes this.

Share This Page