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Getting ready for triple digits

Discussion in 'OUR SHOPS AND THE SPACES WE WORK IN (Shop Photos)' started by firestopper, Mar 16, 2017.

  1. firestopper

    firestopper H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Forecast is calling for 95 degrees on Saturday so we serviced Swampzilla and replaced all the H2O hoses and installed new media pads. Wont be long before we hit 100ยบ +.
    There goes the $65/month electric bill :cry:.

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    Bring it mother nature!
     
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  2. aliva

    aliva Active User Active Member

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    Should move to Canada much cooler this time of the year
     
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  3. tweinke

    tweinke United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Careful what you ask for!
     
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  4. ch2co

    ch2co United States Grumpy Old Man H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Location:
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    Be glad that you don't live in a more humid area. Swamp coolers just turn the air from muggy into more muggy with little or no cooling.
    So far, I've been able to just use a whole house fan at night. Its in a back (unused) upstairs bedroom window and pulls air from the nice
    cool basement (a little too cool in the winter) through the whole house. I seal up all the openings during the daytime to keep my cool.
    It seldom gets above the mid to upper 70's.
     
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  5. Alan H

    Alan H United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Paco, you are cooling a very large metal building. I am curious how much water that unit consumes. Do you have any idea?
     
  6. firestopper

    firestopper H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Alen,
    The building is fully insulated with R-30 so keeping it cool is fairly easy with about 30 degree pull down. As for water use, I'm not sure as our water comes from a community well and water is inexpensive for us. SW Arizona has very low humidity levels and is ideal for swamp coolers so long as they are maintained. 12k cfm works for this size building with the scheduled ductwork. I worked outside most of my life and still do with the FD but the older I get the cooler environment I prefer during 105+ days.
     
  7. firestopper

    firestopper H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I did have to reduce the RPM's on the unit today. The new media is less dense than OEM and had water entrainment into the dry section of the unit. I used a laser tachometer to adjust the double sheave from 306 to 248 rpm's. The bonus is an amp draw drop from 11.5 to 8.5 so might save a little on electric bill and no real airflow drop.
     
  8. FOMOGO

    FOMOGO United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I've thought about using one in the new shop, but we only get a few days a year in the 90's, and the shop, after insulation and rock doesn't get much above 80, and is dry also. I'm sure where you are it's essential in the summer, and much nicer than mine in the winter. Looks like swampzilla should more than do the job. Cheers, Mike
     
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  9. firestopper

    firestopper H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Hi Mike,
    Swampzilla has kept me in the comfort zone coming up on its third season. Keeping it close to the ground allows me to maintain and change out the water frequently. Colorado has beautiful summers for sure, but I don't like the cold white stuff much. We have Mt. Lemon about 40 minutes away, and with the 9K foot elevation, I can quickly get my snow fix.

    Last year I had flocculation (dandruff as I call it) but Im sure it was due to some treatment I used on the old media pads in an effort to extend the life. I had zero issues the first season so I ruled out hard water issues. I sourced the new pads made by Munter for much less than the OEM but as mentioned I had to recalibrate the system.
    Peace, Paco
     
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  10. TheGoodLordCalvert

    TheGoodLordCalvert United States Swarf Registered Member

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    Do you have any concerns about the extra humidity rusting any of your equipment? I'm in Phoenix and looking for a way to cool my workshop down to a tolerable level when it hits triple digits. Swamp coolers are cheaper than installing a mini-split.
     
  11. firestopper

    firestopper H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    This will be my third year in the building and have no rust issues. The steel rack is stocked with HR and CR as well as tubing. All material is wiped and bare with no protection prior to stocking and zero rust thus far. The welding tables (surfaces) are also rust free. All the machines have a light coat of oil on exposed surfaces year round, but that's just preventative maintenance. Surprisingly enough, the humidity level is extremely low during use. In late June and early to mid July, the monsoons prevent the swamp from cooling 100% but then I usually just run the blower to keep the air moving. The insulation helps a ton year round.
    Then electric bill reflects Swampzilla usage though.
     
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  12. Rustrp

    Rustrp United States Active Member Active Member

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    Based on my experience of filling by hand (on a very temporary basis) a much smaller cooler, I would guess 100-200 gallons a day on a unit that size. I was really surprised to hear the pump sucking air only a couple of hours after filling the sump.
     
  13. Tozguy

    Tozguy Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Don't need A/C around here just yet

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  14. firestopper

    firestopper H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Each wet section holds about 5 gallons and the unit is on the east exposure and close to the ground so it only gets four hours of direct sunlight. I'm sure it consumes a fair amount of water, but our water bill is extremely inexpensive being on a community well. I keep 1100 sf of grass (year round) for the hell hounds that consumes way more water than the cooler as does the drip irrigation for the vegetation and two large citrus trees. My summer water bill is around $25-40 per month. Now if I lived in the city, it would be a different story. The quality of Tucson water (city) is only good for extinguishing fires and would cost $150-200/month. They had great water when I was kid, but the Central Arizona Water project (CAP) mucked that up and drove up the price.
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  15. FOMOGO

    FOMOGO United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Were from the government, and were here to help you. Cheers, Mike.
     
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