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General Discussions of Atlas Lathes

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mrbreezeet1

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#31
CaveBob, l want to see that QCGB.
I know, I know, Get my DC motor going.
I still have to finish the powered leadscrew too.
The thing that always got me about the Logan, you might have gears set up for a nice slow finish cut,( Right to left) but then to do a cross cut, it seemed way faster.
The D/C leadscrew motor hopefully will take care of that. It has started to warm up here, So I either need to get on it, or come up with a new excuse.....................LOL.

I did do some wiring tonight though for the 1/2 HP DC motor.
I might have to go out and buy some 16AWG tomorrow.
 

caveBob

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#32
Touché mrbreezeet1, gotta get that mill running first to cut the slot in the new leadscrew... it's tough being patient when you have to huh...
 

bob308

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#33
back when I bought my 12x36 atlas I was a welder. so I built a stand out of a piece of 10" h beam. the legs were 3"pipe with 3/8 wall. with bracing I think it weighed a little over 200 lb. with out the lathe on it. never had problems with flex. used that setup for 25 years. then I moved up to a 14 1/2" south bend with a quick change gear box.

nothing wrong with the lathe most problems are how and what they are mounted on.
 

Round in circles

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#34
O/P , I read your first post a long time ago & have just re read the whole thread a few minutes ago .

I notice you said you were thinking of getting a QCTP .. hang onto the lantern tool post holder there are some jobs that it is best to use it for .
 

ndnchf

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#35
They are not bad lathes, anyone who says that is just ignorant. They have their limitations. But if used within these limitations, they are fine. I have a 12x24 that I've owned for over 30 years. I've made hundreds of parts on it over the years. There have been a few times that I wished for a larger lathe, but only a few. It has served me well and is like an old friend.

By all means, add an AXA QCTP. It will make using the lathe much more enjoyable.

Atcrf.jpg
 

gilo

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#36
Accuracy depends on the operator, who by experience, will be familiar with the idiosyncrasies of his individual machine. Let me say that as a new member, I hope to be treated with forbearance and tolerance as one new to advanced lathe work on the Atlas 12 - the mere mention of which will invite scorn and derision on another forum I could name. Glad to be here.
 

ghostdncr

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#38
I recently acquired a Craftsman-badged Atlas 12 x 24 Model 101.07380 (1936 vintage, I believe) and while the machine has a full ton of shortcomings, it's all about context. With skill and patience, one can do marvelous work on one of these simple machines. If I needed to turn 80,000 round widgets on a tight delivery schedule, I'd get Mazak on the phone and let the Atlas sit idle. I believe many bad mouth these lathes because they've pushed them far beyond their design capabilities and when the machine failed to achieve their ridiculous expectations, blame was cast upon the machine. Used within their original design envelope by a skilled operator, they can do some exquisite work.
 

gilo

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#39
I don't think I can speak to the "flexibility" issue as my 12x36 is a underdrive model mounted to it's cabinet made, primarily, of 3/16" steel. I do think the cross slide a bit shortish and under weight and so could contribute to a problem here.
 

gilo

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#40
I know many problems occur when lathes are affixed to flimsy tables. On service calls to older (100yrs +) companies in the Mid West or North East I noticed that many, if not all, lathes were mounted to cast iron legs or heavily timbered (6" x 6" oak legs) well braced with 3 to 4 inch thick tops and these were not the big ones!
For Craftsman /Atlas lathes one would do well to consider a welded steel table (not thin wall tubing, not sheet metal) for maximum rigidity.
 

FOMOGO

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#41
That's just one of the great things about this place, no bad attitudes, just helpful folks with a will to improve what they have and make it the best it can be. I would no more get rid of my atlas than I would my old Harley. I have a bigger/better machine now, but you don't throw out your first born just because you have another child. Who knows, maybe I'm a little too sentimental. Mike

P1000355.JPG
 

Bill Rosselot

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#42
Ive got an old Atlas 10 QC42Ive not repainted it just made it run. It is not the best is is worn in places but she is a good old girl not going to win any beauty contests and she is not a bench queen. I would like to have a 14" gearhead lathe but the budget does not allow for that yet. I will have another lathe very soon that is an old Willard that is a 13 x 36 and when I get it put back together I plan on rebuilding this Atlas. And I will probably completely disassemble and go through every part and bring it back to original shape. I have most of the attachments for it. Plus a quick change tool post. But I think they do a good job yes they are not the 3000 pound monster that can take .500 per pass but if you take your time they do work well. One thing over the last few years the parts have been harder and harder to come by.


20160227_215412.jpg
 

Bill Rosselot

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#43
That's just one of the great things about this place, no bad attitudes, just helpful folks with a will to improve what they have and make it the best it can be. I would no more get rid of my atlas than I would my old Harley. I have a bigger/better machine now, but you don't throw out your first born just because you have another child. Who knows, maybe I'm a little too sentimental. Mike

View attachment 228705
Mike you have a follower rest I found one but need to build one new adjuster bolt and guide can you tell me what they make the guides from its not brass???? Thanks for the help Bill
 

ndnchf

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#44
You might consider using roller fingers rather than the original bronze one. They are much smoother. Fngrs.jpg
 

FOMOGO

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#45
Bill, I'm not back home until next month. I haven't had a chance to use the follower rest on mine yet, it was just on there for the pic, and can't recall what the guides are made from. As said above the roller style work well, but I think for most operations bronze or even mild steel would probably be fine. Cast iron might work well also. Cheers, Mike
 

Bill Rosselot

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#48
Bill, I'm not back home until next month. I haven't had a chance to use the follower rest on mine yet, it was just on there for the pic, and can't recall what the guides are made from. As said above the roller style work well, but I think for most operations bronze or even mild steel would probably be fine. Cast iron might work well also. Cheers, Mike
I think they are bronze cast but not sure. I think I'm going to build a set of roller fingers for it.
 

schor

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#49
I have a th54 and I have thought about upgrading to something else, but it suits my needs perfectly.

I think what happens on some sites is that the 'professionals' don't want to bother answering questions from the amateurs.

I made new fingers out of ampco bronze.

Check out my youtube channel for some vids on my atlas. I did an x-axis dro, qctp locking handle, teardown of a th54 and various others vids. I am working on putting a qcgb on the lathe and have some videos coming out on that soon. (I hope)
 

Round in circles

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#50
Looks like I will have to make some. Thanks I plan to make a steady rest also so I maybe asking for some measurements if possible. Thanks again.

Bill
Bill could you make them in steel then & drill the ends for grub screw located pointed brass or phosphor bronze rods or even tap for brass or phosphor bronze screws as the bearing surfaces ?

When it gets a bit warmer for me to playout in the unheated mancupboard I'll be having to adapt a small set of supports which were almost brand new for some modern lathe .
The bearing arms are a hardish brass square rod that has been milled out for the locking screws .
I guess that when / if they get too worn down I might be able to invert them to get a bit more use out of them .
 
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mrbreezeet1

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#51
Looks like a power lead screw?

Any info on that?

That one looks nicely done.

What is that on the back of the ways? Is it a carriage stop? A gauge holder? etc?

And is that a foot kill switch? I've thought about rigging something up like that but as a type of deadman switch since I work alone in the garage most times.

I see lots of neat details on your Atlas that I like!

:thumbzup:
Old thread, but Cave Bob helped me with my powered leadscrew feed project.
Mine uses a Jeep wiper motor.
Best mod I've done to my 10" Logan. (No QCGB)

Sent from my MotoG3 using Tapatalk
 

wa5cab

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#53
I trust that you do understand that you cannot cut threads with a lead screw driven by a separate motor?
 

mrbreezeet1

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#54
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
"I trust that you do understand that you cannot cut threads with a lead screw driven by a separate motor"?

True, You will still need to use the proper gear arrangement in order to cut threads.
Note that TPI same as or multiples of the lead screw do not require use of the thread dial.
Say if your lead screw is 8 TPI, Threads, 8, 16, 24, 32 TPI
 

wa5cab

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#55
That's true in one case (that of making a good thread) but not in the other purpose for the threading dial. Which is to show the operator when he/she can engage the traverse feed without potential damage to the screw or to the half-nuts.
 

wa5cab

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#57
You don't have to. But using the dial will prevent a lot of grinding on the nuts. When used for an engagement guide, it doesn't matter which line you use to close on. But over the past 37 years, my dial has usually been disengaged only when for some reason I was removing it from the carriage (like to gain better access to the carriage clamp).
 
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