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Fusion360

Discussion in 'DRAWING, LAYOUT & CAD' started by HEAVYMETAL87, Jan 24, 2017.

  1. HEAVYMETAL87

    HEAVYMETAL87 United States Active Member Active Member

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    Am I the only person that finds this software to be about as intuitive as trying to wash a cat by hand- or is it just me?

    It seems like even trying to do simple things like move an object in reference to another or copy and paste are vastly more complicated than they should be.
     
  2. rwm

    rwm Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I am just learning it now and I tend to agree. It could be more intuitive. I am finding that I figure out how to do something and then cannot duplicate it later because it didn't make sense. Like all software it just takes experience.
    RObert
     
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  3. TomS

    TomS Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    It's taken me a while to get the hang of it too. Intuitive it's not! I've come to believe it's a mind set. Once you get there it becomes much easier. Still have lot's to learn though. And the built in CAD in a nice feature.

    Tom S.
     
  4. jmarkwolf

    jmarkwolf United States Active User Active Member

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    I'm currently taking a class for Solidworks and finding the same is true. I think it's the nature of the 3D beast.

    Been using AutoCAD for nearly 30 years and don't remember having this much difficulty.
     
  5. HEAVYMETAL87

    HEAVYMETAL87 United States Active Member Active Member

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    Unfortunately I am starting to get the hang of it.
     
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  6. savarin

    savarin Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I've always found all autodesk products unintuitive from the early days of 3D studio.
    I'm stuck with Calagari truespace for all my 3d modelling as I find it simple to use.
    Its a shame because I really like the look of fusion but I'm finding it very to replace my habitual method of working.
     
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  7. Technical Ted

    Technical Ted United States Active Member Active Member

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    I've really come to love Fusion 360. I was using 2D software, and yes there is definitely a learning curve, but now I use Fusion for all my projects. It was my first 3D program and I learned it by watching YouTube videos (there are hundreds) and playing with it. I subscribe to a couple of YouTube stations and with those get updates on the new features that come out monthly and it keeps me fresh on how to use it during periods I don't have a need to actually use it myself for a project.

    My suggestion to anyone wanting to learn is stick with it, play with is as often as you can and watch the videos that are available.

    Good luck,
    Ted
     
  8. RandyM

    RandyM United States Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

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    There is your problem, you have to unlearn your style of thinking for AutoCAD. Once you get past that, you'll be able to learn SolidWorks. I have found many of the programs are very similar, you just have to know the menu structures.
     
  9. Technical Ted

    Technical Ted United States Active Member Active Member

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    I have to agree that the 2D and 3D apps I am familiar with are like apples and oranges... I can't really say that using (although my use was limited) AutoCAD 2D for 20+ years helped me any learning Fusion 360. Totally different thought process and way of doing things. I think 3D CAD really shines for assembly type work where you have multiple components making an assembly.

    I do like AutoCAD 2D for electrical prints though. I currently use Draftsight for that and some simple 2D mechanical drawings as well. But, for the most part, I prefer Fusion.

    Ted
     
  10. RJSakowski

    RJSakowski H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Before Using AutoCAD, I use a product called Autosketch. When I switched to AutoCAD was difficult to figure out how to use the software. A few months and a good reference book helped out and I became reasonably proficient. The same happened when I switched to SolidWorks. Some things were just not logical and I couldn't make things work the way I wanted. I bought some books called "SolidWorks Bible" by Matt Lombard (one with each version upgrade) which helped me through.

    I am still working with SolidWorks after some fourteen years and it is second nature to me now. Parts can be whipped out in a few minutes and full assemblies in a hour or so. I use it do do sketches rather than pencil and paper. I have Fusion 360 installed as well and dabble with it occasionally. It is as confusing, as the others were. I don't use it because I have SolidWorkjs and it is the easiest path for me. For me to become proficient in Fusion will require some total immersion tome, probably a couple of weeks, at least.

    So why do I have Fusion at all? It is because they offer a seamless migration to the CAM programming for my CNC. AutoDesk's recent philosophy to permit free non-commercial use of the software is IMO a huge plus. I have a licensed seat of 2012 SolidWorks that cost me around $4K but a "subscription" which would give me current versions and access to technical help would cost me around $1500/ yr. With Fusion, they upgrade continuously, and every time you log in, you receive the latest update. They now have an electronic CAD package with which can create schematics and printed circuit boards and convert them to solid models that can be used to mill a circuit board.

    Fusion's model renditions are also much nicer than SolidWorks, at least if you are using the standard version. Some of them rival a photographic image. I suspect that there are other features that I am unaware of as well.

    I would recommend that a new user stick with it. It will be frustrating at first but eventually it will work out for you. There are hard copy reference books on Fusion 360 available on Amazon, also a Kindle book, free for 30 days. Amazon has Kindle reader apps for various platforms. John Saunders at NYC CNC has done quite a few You Tube videos on Fusion. They are not as complete as I would like to see them but they are a useful tool. I would recommend starting with simple objects at first. The tutorials tend to try to cover too much and, doing so, they often get confusing.
     
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  11. Technical Ted

    Technical Ted United States Active Member Active Member

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    Here are some of my favorite YouTubers to watch for Fusion 360. There are a lot of beginner ones and some more advanced ones as well (both for CAD and CAM). There is enough in YouTube to learn Fusion without spending any money whatsoever!

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCv0LDps_1xX8NqkfiBK1LaQ

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCo29kn3d9ziFUZGZ50VKvWA

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkExKzWS6u80g4npbU0VX3g

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_VEo4EW9xoPPc4ZVmy4X7A

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiMwMz3RMbW5mbx0iDcRQ2g

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCe0IyK4ntgdPTTjsxjvyHPg

    Great stuff on all this channels!

    Just stick with it!
    Ted
     
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  12. ch2co

    ch2co United States Grumpy Old Man H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I think it depends on how your brain is wired. I have made a couple of attempts to use it and never really could make it do what I wanted (repeatedly :))
    I have used several CAD programs over the last 30-40 years and have had little problems learning any of them. Then I tried (and will probably try again)
    Fusion 360 and it just doesn't click with me. My son in law was up and using it to design parts for a 3D printer in one afternoon! Just goes to show you.
    These young whippersnappers these days and their digital brains.;)
     
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  13. RJSakowski

    RJSakowski H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I precede the baby boomers and sometimes have difficulty remembering where I left my coffee cup. For me, Fusion is definitely trying to teach an old dog new tricks. What I need is the incentive to do it. The issue with a lot of the new CAD software is there are just so many features that they have to use context sensitive menus. Threading your way down to the option you want is often times like running through a rat maze.

    Nevertheless, Fusion is a powerful tool and is continually improving. My CAM software is SprutCAM 7 which is four versions old. Upgrading to the latest version will cost me $1300. If I want to stay current, it will cost me around $600/yr. Contrast that with free Fusion 360 software. When I some point , my SprutCAM software no longer functions for me, I won't be upgrading it but will make it a point to learn how to use Fusion.
     
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  14. USMCDOC

    USMCDOC United States Active Member Active Member

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    Ted,

    This 60 year old dog thanks you for those links.. i had already found the NYC CNC guy.. i like him a lot! I am trying to learn this 360 stuff.. my main problem is that i don't play with the software everyday! I need to do that.
     
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  15. rcflier

    rcflier Denmark Active Member Active Member

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    Hi guys.

    I've also decided to use Fusion 360. I work in a public school, so I have access to both Inventor and Fusion 360. But I had to toss a coin.
    I want to use Fusion to draw/construct a Gyrobee one seat gyrocopter. That should be quite an easy project. I'll probably have some questions along the way.

    Right now I'm pondering the most efficient way of constructing an extruded aluminum tube - as there are several ways to do it.

    Draw the face and then extrude? PressPull? And others... I intend to draw all parts in inch (as per the original drawing) and then convert to metric.
    It should be possible to fit all parts together to check it out. Aluminum 6061-T6 is costly and I have to travel far to buy it, so I would like to do that just once.

    TIA

    Cheers
    Erik Werner Hansen
     
  16. Technical Ted

    Technical Ted United States Active Member Active Member

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    I like using sketches for everything I can. It's easy to change things later on if you want to tweak a dimension. Also, converting to metric is easily done just by clicking on "Units" in the browser. You can also enter either inch or metric when defining dimensions by using "in" or "mm" regardless of the current units.

    When learning something new with Fusion I would watch a video and duplicate what I was watching in Fusion. I would pause the video and replicate it and re-watch that section of the video until I had the process down.

    I have a lot of fun just playing with Fusion!

    Good luck,
    Ted
     
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  17. rcflier

    rcflier Denmark Active Member Active Member

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    Yes, the painless conversion was a dealbreaker for me. I didn't know I can use both inch and mm along the way - thank you.
    I don't care if my works are in the sky also - no secrets. I know I can construct the parts in many ways - I was just wondering: Which is the most efficient?
    Hmm, using a solid, press/pull all holes and then press/pull the inside to make the extrusion would do. As so many other ways....

    Cheers
    Erik
     
  18. rcflier

    rcflier Denmark Active Member Active Member

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    I had hoped to draw some help lines, because several holes shared a common distance. (old Autocad thinking)
    Now I think I might make some points for the circles. I just need to get thinking the proper Fusion way...

    Cheers
    Erik
     
  19. Techee

    Techee United States Iron Registered Member

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    Ted ....Thank you for the references. I already watched the 1st one. Very helpful!

     
  20. Groundhog

    Groundhog United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    There are a lot of very helpful videos for Fusion 360. Autodesk has a channel on YouTube with a bunch of "how to" and "Fast Tip" videos. (do a YouTube search and a Google search and you will find tons of helpful videos). Lars Christensen has a lot of introductory videos and other helpful videos. When possible I watch videos in full screen mode so I can see the menu clicks and other detail in the videos that I miss when at the smaller size.
    Use the "?" Help question mark in the upper right of Fusion 360 itself. You can get a surprising number of questions answered using the "search help" box, many which are videos (it may be necessary to follow the supplied link to the original video page to watch in full screen).
    I was pretty good with TurboCad 3D and so learning Fusion 360 was pretty easy. It seems worthwhile to learn and use as long as it stays cost effective. For myself I concentrate on what I need to know (model, CAM and drawing) and pay less attention to the parts that are not important to me now (like sculpt, render, etc.).
     
  21. rcflier

    rcflier Denmark Active Member Active Member

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    Hi Mike, and thank you for your help.
    Just before I went here I drew two drilled tubes.
    Draw a flat sketch with dimensioned circles, then extrude it to a bar (the circles automatically becomes holes).
    Select the end face, make a sketch with the wall thickness as offset and press/pull it. Tada...
    I think I'll end up lovin' it. But I still need to find all the things that make it fast and easy. Like moving 3 circles together as one.
    It is quite different to the old 2D Autocad I remember.

    Cheers
    Erik
     
  22. USMCDOC

    USMCDOC United States Active Member Active Member

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  23. Desolus

    Desolus United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    Maybe it's just me, but 360 seems to use the same methodology as every other professional cad package. I at least picked it up almost immediately.

    Once you get used to working with constraints to * fully * define your geometry in this way you will be able to pick up other cad packages much easier.
     
  24. Groundhog

    Groundhog United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

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    I agree. I have AutoCad and TurboCad (using 3D) experience and learning Fusion 360 is pretty seamless. Lots of little tricks and shortcuts can be found online.
     

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