1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. PLEASE: Read the FORUM RULES BEFORE registering!

    Dismiss Notice

Emery Cloth, Sandpaper

Discussion in 'GENERAL DISCUSSIONS' started by ddickey, Aug 12, 2017 at 2:33 PM.

  1. ddickey

    ddickey United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    388
    Trophy Points:
    63
    City:
    Red Wing
    State:
    Minnesota

    -Return to Top-

    What do you guys use?
    Want to get a supply of abrasives.
    Where is a good online store to buy these?
    I notice Emery cloth comes in fine, medium but not grits, why?
     
  2. richl

    richl United States Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    76
    Trophy Points:
    28
    City:
    atlantic highlands
    State:
    New Jersey

    -Return to Top-

    I'm using 3m pads right now for the lathe and mill. I use very fine sandpaper for sharpening tools, 200-1000grit and above.
    Anything coarser and I use that on disks, or flap disks for grinding and material removal...

    Hth, ymmv
    Rich
     
  3. kvt

    kvt Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    592
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    San Antonio
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    All depends on what I am trying to do, I have both sand paper and emery cloth. And yes the cold comes in varying grits. I also like the waterproof emery paper for some items where I do wet sanding for finish. Use anything from 60 grid to 1500 use a lot of 320-400 cloth when doing some smoothing on the lathe, use the coarse for shaping a bit, and the real fine gives a nice surface to do final polish on. Where to purchase I look for and watch for sales as much as possible, and purchase roles of the cloth and large packages of the paper, then they last a long time.
    Hope this helps.
     
  4. Ulma Doctor

    Ulma Doctor Infinitely Curious Active Member

    Likes Received:
    2,825
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Ethereal Plane
    City:
    Tracy
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    there may be many abrasives that could be considered emery cloth.
    it is usually cloth backed with abrasive glued to its surface, not to be confused with crocus cloth.
    crocus cloth has the abrasive coating the backing, but not bound to the backing in the same manner as emery cloth.
    the crocus, iron oxide abrasive, sheds easily in comparison in use
    crocus cloth is sold in the fine, medium, coarse grades without reference to grit.
    were emery is sold in grit variations

    i generally use emery cloth for sanding munged up or rusty shafts.
    i use either 150 or 220 grit for my needs
    the last rolls i got were at HF.
    i was pleased with the performance and cost of the HF emery cloth.
    some things are a crap shoot at HF, but the emery cloths are decent products
    the wet/dry abrasives are generally my goto gear.
    3m and Norton make fantastic products, but you pay a premium for them.
    if you do a lot of hard sanding, the more expensive products will perform better and last longer.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2017 at 5:19 PM
    BGHansen likes this.
  5. benmychree

    benmychree United States John York H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    388
    Trophy Points:
    83
    City:
    Saint Helena
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    I use abrasive cloth in "shop rolls", I prefer Norton products, I think they are worth the premium cost. I keep and use 80, 120,180, and 240 grit rolls in a rack that I made of 1/8 x 2" flat bar bent into a U shape with holes drilled near the ends of the U and a piece of 1/2" pipe that runs through the hollow hubs of the rolls, this is mounted on the wall near the lathe. I also use wet/dry paper for various uses such as rough lapping on a surface plate, and keep various grades of sandpaper for woodwork.
     
    BGHansen and Ulma Doctor like this.
  6. David S

    David S Canada Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    630
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Brockville, Ontario
    City:
    Brockville
    State:
    Ontario

    -Return to Top-

    I do mostly clock repair stuff and keep various grits of wet / dry paper mounted on a granite counter top sample.

    working one with various grit emery paper.jpg

    David
     
  7. tweinke

    tweinke United States Active User H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    245
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Fairmont
    State:
    Minnesota

    -Return to Top-

    Now that's an interesting idea!
     
  8. RJSakowski

    RJSakowski H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    2,510
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Barneveld
    State:
    Wisconsin

    -Return to Top-

    I primarily use silicon carbide wet or dry paper ranging from 60 to 2000 grit. I use it dry, with WD40 or water for a lubricant, depending upon the application.

    Last year, I made the pleasant discovery that the blown belts from my portable belt sander can be used with water. An extra bit of life from an otherwise piece of trash.

    For fine polishing, I use diamond paste, purchased from McMaster. I use it with water or WD40 for a lubricant.
     
    Ulma Doctor likes this.
  9. BGHansen

    BGHansen United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    1,227
    Trophy Points:
    93
    City:
    Charlotte
    State:
    Michigan

    -Return to Top-

    I've got a selection of cloth backed emery cloth from Enco (MSC). Have 1", 1 1/2" and 2" rolls in 60 grit down to 240. Also have a roll of 400 grit.

    Bruce
     
  10. Dave Paine

    Dave Paine United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    151
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Eastern PA
    State:
    Pennsylvania

    -Return to Top-

    I do woodwork as well as machining. I always have some sanding in my woodwork projects, especially wood turning projects.

    I have sheets of abrasive from 60 grit to 2400 grit. I have some as normal sandpaper and the finer ones also in wet-dry paper. I use the wet-dry for sharpening hand bench plane blades.

    I like the Klingspor abrasives. There are many other good brands. Klingspor has a good site and a couple of stores, one in North Carolina.

    You can get a lot of different abrasives in many grits with paper, cloth, hook and loop backing etc.

    http://www.woodworkingshop.com/

    I have some cloth backed abrasives where were sold as wood turning abrasives. I also use these on metal. Work well.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2017 at 9:12 AM
  11. Old junk

    Old junk United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    38
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    Hackettstown
    State:
    New Jersey

    -Return to Top-

    I do a lot of body work,sandpaper is a you get what you pay for product.most cheap paper is garbage.3m or Mirka is only 2 I found not to "load up" with fillers and paint,more bang for your buck.keep Emory around also for heavy duty rough stuff.holds up without tearing.
     
  12. Dave Paine

    Dave Paine United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    151
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    Eastern PA
    State:
    Pennsylvania

    -Return to Top-

    Old junk likes this.
  13. Silverbullet

    Silverbullet Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    777
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    Marlton
    State:
    New Jersey

    -Return to Top-

    An old leather belt works well with oil and paste grits. The polish comes up quick and shines great. It's a bit messy but really works well.
     
    Ulma Doctor likes this.
  14. kd4gij

    kd4gij United States Active User Active Member

    Likes Received:
    1,126
    Trophy Points:
    113
    City:
    St. Petersburg
    State:
    Florida

    -Return to Top-

  15. 4gsr

    4gsr Global Moderator Staff Member H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    2,209
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Victoria, Texas
    City:
    Victoria
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    Here's a picture of my stash!
     

    Attached Files:

    Bill W. likes this.
  16. tq60

    tq60 United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    199
    Trophy Points:
    43
    City:
    madera
    State:
    California

    -Return to Top-

    We have lots of types and grits from many places.

    Estate and yard sales are good sources as sometimes harbor freight in their bulk packs sometimes have good grade in them.

    3m seems to be better tan many but it depends on material and tools.

    Our delta 330 sanders consume standard sheets in seconds but reused belts last longer.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk
     
  17. Bob La Londe

    Bob La Londe United States Active Member Active Member

    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    8
    City:
    Yuma
    State:
    Arizona

    -Return to Top-

    I have emery cloth in rolls and its listed by grit size. I have one roll of 3 inch I use for sanding blocks. It holds up 100 times better than paper on sanding blocks. My Emery rolls came from MSC, but there are lots of sources. I've got a granite counter top I glue sandpaper to for rough squaring arts, and a section I glue fine sand paper to for doing alight pass to remove mill marks on aluminum parts. I've been thinking about buying sheet size emery cloth for that too as the paper sanding sheets just don't hold up. Not even the wet or dry stuff.
     
  18. Z2V

    Z2V United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    8
    City:
    Cedar Park
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    Just don't use Emory for anything electrical like seating motor brushes or electrical contacts, etc. Use sand paper for these type work.
     
  19. Desolus

    Desolus United States H-M Supporter - Premium Content H-M Supporter-Premium

    Likes Received:
    48
    Trophy Points:
    18
    City:
    fort worth
    State:
    Texas

    -Return to Top-

    My go to is a piece of scrap corian counter-top in my lathe spindle with various abrasive compounds, glued on sandpaper, diamond paste, oxide polishes, corian makes an excellent lap, and it is easy to re-surface. Best of all you can typically find scrap corian for free!

    It really all depends on what specifically you are trying to do.
     
    Ulma Doctor likes this.

Share This Page