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Cutting 1/4" thick Steel Plate

EmilioG

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#1
I need a small triangular shaped (three leges) steel stand. I've made these before, but by using 3 stock steel flat bars and welding them all together.
This is smaller, approx. 3.5 x 3.5" Can this shape be cut whole from a square plate of steel? If so, what is the best way or should I just weld? (more work).
See attached photo. (lower right). The round bar will be welded after a press fit. This base will not be supporting a lot of weight, around 6 lbs. max.
Just need it to be sturdy, little to no flex. This is an art sculpture armature stand.
 

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francist

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#2
Sure it could be taken out of one piece. They're all straight cuts so an angle grinder with cutoff wheel would work, or a bandsaw too but slower. I'm thinking though that by the time you procure quite a large piece of metal to accommodate that shape, cut what will probably be about 3 feet worth of cut when it's all added up, then throw the two pie-shaped pieces away as odd-shaped scrap, you may wish you had gone the flat bar with welds route. Cheaper, faster, and a lot less finishing in the long run.

Just my thinking on it.

-frank

Edit: Sorry, was looking at the picture of the larger one more than paying attention to your dimensions. 3-1/2" square I'd cut it out of one piece.
 
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RJSakowski

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#3
If esthetics isn't an issue, why not just use the 3.5 x 3.5" plate as is?
 

David S

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#4
Or cut the 3.5 x 3.5 piece diagonally across the corners and end up with two.

David
 

DHarris

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#5
If you have access to a plasma cutter (or a friend with one), cutting that out would be a 5 min. task.
where are you located?
 

chips&more

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#6
Plasma torch would be my choice. BUT, you will have a lot material waste! Maybe re-think the three piece flat bar method:)...Dave
 

EmilioG

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#7
This is a small plate, 3.5" square. Plate is $12. Can this be milled out? I can drill a series of holes first then clamp to a mill table?
Straight cuts and protractor on scribed lines. Aesthetics is an issue. I prefer not to use a square plate. I'll probably go the weld route.
Thanks
 

woodchucker

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#8
I don't see the mill as an efficient way of doing it. if it were me I would cut it on the band saw. But short of that I would use flat bar and just run a bead, a fine bead, there's not a lot of stress there.
 

firestopper

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#9
Lay out and weld three pieces of flat strap (gaped) and grind flat and smooth..Done. Flat bar is inexpensive (HR).
It looks like 1/4" x 1.5" flat bar but hard to tell from the photo. Your welding the upright as well.
 

mikey

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#10
All excellent suggestions. I would just lay it out on a small piece of plate, cut it out on the bandsaw, dress the edges on the mill and be done with it.
 

ezduzit

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#11
The center leg adds absolutely nothing to the stability; it just complicates an otherwise simple design.
 

EmilioG

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#13
I'm going with the bandsaw/mill finish idea. Thank you all, thank you Mikey. That's the one!
 

toolman_ar

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#14
Do you have a jig saw?

May sound crazy but I have done 1/2” plate before. Because that is all I had at the time.

toolman_ar
 

EmilioG

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#15
Do you have a jig saw?

May sound crazy but I have done 1/2” plate before. Because that is all I had at the time.

toolman_ar
Yes. You’re right. It does sound crazy. I like my face the way it is. Thanks I’m going with the band saw. Much safer. Always wear eye
protection ;)
 

woodchucker

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#16
Yes. You’re right. It does sound crazy. I like my face the way it is. Thanks I’m going with the band saw. Much safer. Always wear eye
protection ;)
What would the jig saw do to your face. You keep it out of the way of the chips. Don't stick it in there;). Both work.
 

EmilioG

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#17
Thanks, I just don't use jig saws for 1/4" thk. steel. I prefer a band saw.
 

woodchucker

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#18
Thanks, I just don't use jig saws for 1/4" thk. steel. I prefer a band saw.
me too, but if you didn't have a band saw, the jig saw could be your friend. There are some nice metal cutting blades these days. Even my recip saw loaded with a freud blade cuts really fast.
 

toolman_ar

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#19

Here is an example. He gives a good explanation of time to cut at the end.

Wear your P.P.E.

toolman_ar
 

den-den

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#20
I would use my portable band saw. If I did not have that, a hacksaw would do it with a little effort.
 

richl

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#21
That was quite a good demonstration. Certainly the bandsaw is the better solution, but when you don't have the expensive tools, a 4 1/2" grinder and jigsaw are your friend. It's real easy to forget how much really good work has been done with basic tools.
 

Uglydog

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#22
I've got a vintage OA track torch which I rebuilt.
Works very well, and isn't difficult to set for a perfect cut.
Regardless, I vote HR and weld. TIG works better with CR. But its just a little weld.

Daryl
MN
 
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